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Apr
20
reviewed No Action Needed Commas before that
Mar
19
comment A word meaning “the state of obeying a rule”
Adherents are usually religious folk.
Mar
19
reviewed No Action Needed A word meaning “the state of obeying a rule”
Mar
19
reviewed Reviewed “All opened files” or “all open files”?
Mar
19
reviewed No Action Needed Meaning of: “The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain't distributed right”
Mar
5
revised to stalk the block
improved quote formatting/emphasis, found and linked source
Mar
5
revised received religion
added 34 characters in body
Mar
5
suggested approved edit on to stalk the block
Mar
5
answered received religion
Mar
5
comment Is there any idiom which is exactly opposite of 'head start'?
@QualityTalk I upvoted this answer, but I think in your comment’s example I would prefer to see “handicap”. I might be influenced by the term as it applies to golf.
Mar
5
revised Is there any idiom which is exactly opposite of 'head start'?
citation, formatting, copy editing mostly to do with rampant “i.e.” and lack of use/mention distinction, minor cosmetic touches like curly quotes and en dashes, maintained commentary-as-answer, but trimmed discussion-forum-style signoff
Mar
5
comment Is there any idiom which is exactly opposite of 'head start'?
This phrase seems to refer to a disadvantaged competitor, not the disadvantage itself.
Mar
5
suggested approved edit on Is there any idiom which is exactly opposite of 'head start'?
Mar
5
comment Is there any idiom which is exactly opposite of 'head start'?
Per your definition, this word refers to the disadvantaged competitor, not the disadvantage itself. Put the other way, I don’t call someone a “head start”; I would call likely winners “favorites” or something similar, and likely losers “underdogs” or “long shots” as you have here.
Mar
5
comment What does the word “blinkerdom” mean?
+1 for apt explanation of this nonce word. Might be worth including a bit about highly productive suffixes employed by native speakers for ad-hoc nominalization, and/or the specific shift in meaning that -dom applies to words.
Mar
5
comment What does the word “blinkerdom” mean?
@Kris I can’t find “nonce” defined anywhere as a noun that would fit your statement, only as an adjective commonly attached to the noun “word”.
Mar
5
comment Opposite of Envy
Please edit this question so that it appears more specific and can be reopened. I think the title might be hindering you here (see comments from others above).
Mar
5
revised Opposite of Envy
added 249 characters in body
Mar
5
comment Opposite of Envy
@clawson It’s a big relief to hear that I picked up on the tone in your question. Out of those three, I like “smug” as accessible and economical, though “smug schadenfreude” splits the difference in a really nice way.
Mar
4
answered Is there any idiom which is exactly opposite of 'head start'?