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Jan
12
accepted Is there another way to refer to the “proximal interphalangeal joints”?
Jan
12
comment Is there another way to refer to the “proximal interphalangeal joints”?
@JEL, I meant to capture a moment when an absentminded person begins to rest their head but is lost in thought and doesn't quite. They are sort of hanging there, two PIP knuckles "docked" into the groove beneath a cheekbone, with almost no transfer of weight.
Jan
12
comment Is there another way to refer to the “proximal interphalangeal joints”?
@HotLicks - I was thinking of fights and brass knuckles, which definitely refer to the metacarpophalangeal joints. But you're totally right that when you mentioned "knocking doors" and "knuckles" in one sentence, I felt no conflict in words. But perhaps that's because with knocking doors, it's very clear what is meant by "knuckles"? Whereas in my case, it could be either set of knuckles (for example, putting the metacarpophlangeal to your chin or mouth, versus the PIP to your cheekbone).
Jan
12
asked Is there another way to refer to the “proximal interphalangeal joints”?
Jan
4
accepted How to parse this sentence by Joyce's in A Portrait of the Artist?
Jan
4
comment How to parse this sentence by Joyce's in A Portrait of the Artist?
I was nowhere close, and your answer was astounding in its clarity (and clean formatting). Wish I could upvote more than once. Thank you very much.
Jan
4
revised How to parse this sentence by Joyce's in A Portrait of the Artist?
deleted 22 characters in body
Jan
4
asked How to parse this sentence by Joyce's in A Portrait of the Artist?
Aug
24
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
9
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
15
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
7
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
16
revised Adjective/noun for a situation that cannot be solved?
Formatting. Though, I'm not sure it's significant enough. Feel free to reject.
Mar
16
suggested approved edit on Adjective/noun for a situation that cannot be solved?
Mar
15
comment Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
@BlessedGeek - Sorry, I think I just don't understand you. My point wasn't about my name—I was just clarifying in case my name had something to do with an assumption that I'm not a native speaker. I gave a reason as to why I felt my question was more appropriate on ELU than ELL. Maybe it's a bad question in general, and that's fine to say, but really, I was only trying to address your arguments here, and I don't understand your counterarguments. Let's just let a mod handle this.
Mar
15
comment Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
@BlessedGeek... Is that... your only counterargument? Because I addressed this, if you read my third sentence.
Mar
15
comment Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
@BlessedGeek - I am a native speaker, though. (Despite my name, I was born in the U.S.) Not to say ELL is only for non-native speakers, but I think I'm asking on a higher level than simply learning, I think. I know that pragmatist is the correct word. I'm asking if a pragmatic might be valid too, because in a presentation I'm writing, I dislike how "the idealist and the pragmatist" sounds (completely subjective, but it sounds a bit too black-and-white / dichotomous to me), and I would like it if I could say "...and the pragmatic."
Mar
15
comment Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
@BlessedGeek - Could you explain, please? I thought this appropriately fell under grammar.
Mar
15
asked Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
Feb
11
awarded  Critic