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Aug
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awarded  Notable Question
Jul
9
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
15
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
7
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
16
revised Adjective/noun for a situation that cannot be solved?
Formatting. Though, I'm not sure it's significant enough. Feel free to reject.
Mar
16
suggested approved edit on Adjective/noun for a situation that cannot be solved?
Mar
15
comment Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
@BlessedGeek - Sorry, I think I just don't understand you. My point wasn't about my name—I was just clarifying in case my name had something to do with an assumption that I'm not a native speaker. I gave a reason as to why I felt my question was more appropriate on ELU than ELL. Maybe it's a bad question in general, and that's fine to say, but really, I was only trying to address your arguments here, and I don't understand your counterarguments. Let's just let a mod handle this.
Mar
15
comment Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
@BlessedGeek... Is that... your only counterargument? Because I addressed this, if you read my third sentence.
Mar
15
comment Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
@BlessedGeek - I am a native speaker, though. (Despite my name, I was born in the U.S.) Not to say ELL is only for non-native speakers, but I think I'm asking on a higher level than simply learning, I think. I know that pragmatist is the correct word. I'm asking if a pragmatic might be valid too, because in a presentation I'm writing, I dislike how "the idealist and the pragmatist" sounds (completely subjective, but it sounds a bit too black-and-white / dichotomous to me), and I would like it if I could say "...and the pragmatic."
Mar
15
comment Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
@BlessedGeek - Could you explain, please? I thought this appropriately fell under grammar.
Mar
15
asked Can “pragmatic” be used as a noun, e.g. “He was a pragmatic”?
Feb
11
awarded  Critic
Feb
9
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
4
accepted How did “yours truly” become a euphemism for “I” or “me”?
Aug
15
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
14
accepted A word for a relationship in which one thing (or state) must exist in order for another thing (or state) to exist
Aug
14
comment A word for a relationship in which one thing (or state) must exist in order for another thing (or state) to exist
@JasperLocke - Oh, that's a great one! I'd upvote if you posted it.
Aug
14
comment A word for a relationship in which one thing (or state) must exist in order for another thing (or state) to exist
Ah, thank you! I think that's it—and it was so obvious! Let me wait a few more hours though, in case someone comes up with a word that strikes even truer to me.
Aug
14
comment A word for a relationship in which one thing (or state) must exist in order for another thing (or state) to exist
I thought of, simply, dependence, and technically that works, but for some reason I'm convinced there's a word that starts with a 'p'. (But it may not after all.)
Aug
14
comment A word for a relationship in which one thing (or state) must exist in order for another thing (or state) to exist
Okay, I can see that if we're being pedantic, a wedding cake may exist outside of a wedding, and a bride and groom is really only a bride and groom in the context of a wedding. Regarding the latter, we can say I mean a couple. Regarding the former, let's just try to understand what I mean :-)