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Jan
25
comment Is it possible for a new irregular verb to appear in English language?
Keep an eye out for it in sentences and sentence fragments. Also when used alone compare it to its context. If it's in part of a GUI with several other buttons and each is a verb and "login" is a separate word, that's also a good sign.
Jan
25
comment Is it possible for a new irregular verb to appear in English language?
@Mynamite: Start looking at the text in the log-in area of the websites and apps you use. I find the (wrong) single-word verb much more common than the correct two-word verb. Stack Exchange is one of the ones that gets it right. So it's obviously a widely used spelling mistake resulting in a new irregularity that's blisfully ignored by the people who use it. log in -> login is not a lone word in this and when you start looking you also see the reverse is quite common too.
Dec
30
awarded  Yearling
Dec
22
comment What are the distinctions between “authoritarian”, “totalitarian”, and “dictatorial”?
Neither these examples nor the current accepted answer really illustrate any difference between dictator and despot that I can grasp.
Nov
4
awarded  Famous Question
Oct
19
awarded  Famous Question
Sep
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
27
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
16
comment Answer to “enjoy your meal”
There is an English equivalent for "bon appetit". It is "bon appetit". Just as "rendezvous" is the English equivalent for "rendez-vous" and "garage" is the English equivalent for "garage". It's just at the less anglicized end of the scale. Maybe even a bit tongue in cheek but many of us use it, unlike "enjoy your meal".
Aug
6
comment The difference between 'transfer' and 'transit' in the context of airports and train stations
And thus I must now ask what precisely is a "flight transfer"? (-: Is this a common term or just the wording that happened to pop into your head for no particular reason?
Aug
6
comment The difference between 'transfer' and 'transit' in the context of airports and train stations
There's also "airport transfer", which I'm not sure means "transfer between two airports in relative proximity to continue a flight itinerary" or "transport between an airport and a place of accommodation". Or it could mean both.
Aug
5
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
2
revised Is 'set phrase' a set phrase?
typo "and" was meant to be "an"
Aug
2
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
13
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
11
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
7
comment Me and my ancestors - single word
@JaegerJay: "Single word requests" is really just a silly meme of little value or consequence on this one site. For some reason people just keep asking for "a single word" when they're almost always happy to learn any set "term" whether a single word or a short phrase.
Jun
30
comment “make it to there”
I recommend you ask about this on some sites frequented by linguists. linguistics.SE and Quora both can get better answers on topics like this than I have managed.
Jun
30
comment “make it to there”
"I'm surprised they even made it to there." is an example where it could occur in a native speaker's English as well as a non-native. Though " I'm surprised they even made it that far" sounds more natural. For English learners though learning that "here" and "there" don't take certain prepositions a noun would most of the time is the best advice because the times when a native speaker do otherwise are subtle to understand and can be worded more naturally anyway.