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bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Xi'an, China
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comment Is there a term which covers ATM cards, credit cards, and debit cards?
@RLH: It turns out that true credit cards are rare in Europe and many Europeans take it literally to mean their other kind of card won't work! Also many places don't accept American Express and Diners Club due to the high fees they charge merchants. Even "debit card" has subtly different meanings between places. In Australia it's used for a Visa or Mastercard that only access your bank account and not credit. In Europe or the UK it seems to mean a card issued by a bank without credit whether or not it's Visa or Mastercard. Presumably they work with domestic POS networks. It's all messy (-:
Aug
13
comment Is there a word for fake kindness or hospitality?
@Neeku: This is a very slangy sense of "fake", which in its plain sense means "counterfeit", "knockoff", "forged" such as fake diamonds, fake fur, fake brand-name shoes, etc. It's not going to be suitable when any degree of formality is called for.
Aug
12
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
12
comment Is there a word for fake kindness or hospitality?
There's certainly a better adjective than fake for this: insincere.
Jul
24
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
2
awarded  Inquisitive
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
25
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
15
revised “à la” + masculine
gender tags
May
30
revised Is there a verb for remaining silent?
add the single word and phrase requests tags. the OP doesn't specify single word and many english terms like "shut up" or "keep quiet" are made of more than one word, depending on the preferred definition of "word"
May
25
comment Are there English equivalents to Japanese word, ‘有名税-Tax on the famous’?
No, this term applies for the OP's previous question but not this one. "The price of fame" is not the same as the "tall poppy syndrome". Famous people are not the only tall poppies. Tall poppies are equivalent to the nails that pop up in the older question.
May
11
comment If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?
Well they have a backlog with getting the updates out for the next edition is what I meant. I don't know if they have a specific backlog for new words to go in or not. Sorry if I was unclear.
May
11
comment If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?
Also the OED has an enormous backlog in updating and adding words though this is helped by going digital. I have a microprint OED in storage at home but I don't have online access to the newer stuff. I would be interested to see which of these kinds of term they do admit.
May
11
comment If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?
Note though that the OED goes to some lengths to assert that it not be used as an authority of 'wordness'. It declares itself to be a description of the language. I know also that the editors of the OED and other respectable dictionaries "watch" words for a while before deciding whether they're going to stick around and warrant an entry. Especially in the case of the OED which has a strict policy of never removing a word once added, and they have regretted hastily adding new words in the past.
May
10
comment If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?
@GaëlLaurans: Handy is definitely used by English-speaking Germans in English. Until they run into the inevitable confustion when trying to use it with a native English speaker with no knowledge of German/Germany. I've hit it several times over the past 15 years. One friend is even a fully qualified English teacher and should know better (-:
May
10
comment If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?
Yes I tried to make it clear about that and say those examples were all that sprang to mind before going off looking for other people's collections. But they're not the same anyway. Some are not perfectly good forms of English words, plurals of mass nouns, while campings is an invented noun sense for a word that is a perfectly good gerund/present participle/adjective. Prepone was coined in an English speaking country. Indian English is different to Euroenglish or world English in that regard.
May
10
comment If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?
Erik, touristic falls into the third kind of term I described in the title, "mainly by second-language speakers of English". As you'll see in the linked question, the majority of native speakers of English simply don't use it. They use "tourist" as an attributive or they use "touristy". This doesn't mean no native speakers use it, in fact there are probably some native speakers that use each of these terms, but not many.
May
10
comment If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?
I might try to find some words that are known to have been coined outside English. We don't yet know where KTV came from, Handy came from a brand name of CB/ham/shortwave radio in Germany no doubt inspired by English, touristic did come from English but few native speakers use it nowadays compared to nonnative speakers, and the others are plurals of mass nouns just because those popped into my head first. It's easy to think of examples of pseudo-English coined in Japanese but the fact those are written in a foreign script will discount them in the view of some people.
May
10
revised If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?
more links to other questions
May
10
revised If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?
forgot one! links to older questions