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Aug
27
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Aug
16
comment Answer to “enjoy your meal”
There is an English equivalent for "bon appetit". It is "bon appetit". Just as "rendezvous" is the English equivalent for "rendez-vous" and "garage" is the English equivalent for "garage". It's just at the less anglicized end of the scale. Maybe even a bit tongue in cheek but many of us use it, unlike "enjoy your meal".
Aug
6
comment The difference between 'transfer' and 'transit' in the context of airports and train stations
And thus I must now ask what precisely is a "flight transfer"? (-: Is this a common term or just the wording that happened to pop into your head for no particular reason?
Aug
6
comment The difference between 'transfer' and 'transit' in the context of airports and train stations
There's also "airport transfer", which I'm not sure means "transfer between two airports in relative proximity to continue a flight itinerary" or "transport between an airport and a place of accommodation". Or it could mean both.
Aug
5
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
2
revised Is 'set phrase' a set phrase?
typo "and" was meant to be "an"
Aug
2
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Jul
13
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Jul
11
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Jul
7
comment Me and my ancestors - single word
@JaegerJay: "Single word requests" is really just a silly meme of little value or consequence on this one site. For some reason people just keep asking for "a single word" when they're almost always happy to learn any set "term" whether a single word or a short phrase.
Jun
30
comment “make it to there”
I recommend you ask about this on some sites frequented by linguists. linguistics.SE and Quora both can get better answers on topics like this than I have managed.
Jun
30
comment “make it to there”
"I'm surprised they even made it to there." is an example where it could occur in a native speaker's English as well as a non-native. Though " I'm surprised they even made it that far" sounds more natural. For English learners though learning that "here" and "there" don't take certain prepositions a noun would most of the time is the best advice because the times when a native speaker do otherwise are subtle to understand and can be worded more naturally anyway.
Jun
30
comment “make it to there”
@EdwinAshworth: Well we shall have to agree to disagree. Our idiolects must be very different in this respect. No native speaker I know ever says "If I can't make it to there". There is no prepositional deletion because in this construction "there" is not a noun but an adverb. "There" is not defined as being simultaneously every part of speech listed in a dictionary in every possibly syntactical construct. In each construct it will be analysed as one or another of those POS. "From there" and "near there" are commonplace because in thos constructions "there" is nominal.
Jun
5
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May
21
comment Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?
Rissoles are typically served on a plate with gravy and veggies but though I've never had one it turns out there is indeed such a thing as a rissole sandwich. In fact you just remind me that whereas in the US you just have fries but in Australia we used to just have chips, but since McDonalds and co made their mark some decades ago we now have two platonic ideals, one for chips and one for fries. It's no different really from how we view a burger as having somehow a different Platonic essence from a sandwich. (or whatever the right term is.)
May
21
comment Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?
There is a field in either linguistics or philosophy that relates to how different people categorize objects "between" the classical or standard or typical forms. Unfortunately I'm having no luck at all finding what the field is called. Could be something with "Platonic forms". Anyway this is a known and studied phenomenon and I'm not making it up.
May
21
comment Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?
Now you're just telling people how their own native dialect works and their own mind works. I wouldn't think of that as a hamburger but feel free to make up my mind for me if you don't want to learn about. And thanks for the analysis.
May
21
comment Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?
That actually looks like a (ridiculous) "club sandwich"! (-:
May
21
comment Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?
I see a photo of a rissole sandwich.