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Apr
1
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
1
comment What term or phrase means a person's “manner of speaking” in the general sense?
Okay, I think you have it @silenus. Thank you!
Mar
1
accepted What term or phrase means a person's “manner of speaking” in the general sense?
Mar
1
comment What term or phrase means a person's “manner of speaking” in the general sense?
Yeah, these are close, but I just know there's one particular to speech.
Mar
1
comment What term or phrase means a person's “manner of speaking” in the general sense?
I hadn't heard "stylometry" before. Nice. You're correct, though - holistic is a pretty good term for what I'm seeking. I just checked your linked entry, and "linguistic style" is pretty spot on... I think I'll use that for now, at least :-)
Mar
1
asked What term or phrase means a person's “manner of speaking” in the general sense?
Dec
3
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
18
awarded  Supporter
Jan
18
comment “You and your” vs. “Your and your”
Would the inclusion of the ellipted of signify the exclusive possession of relative market performance for each entity ("you" and "your")? Could its omission signify the market performance is relative between the entities, i.e., a comparison? Comparison is definitely involved in the source.
Jan
18
awarded  Scholar
Jan
18
accepted “You and your” vs. “Your and your”
Jan
18
comment “You and your” vs. “Your and your”
Howsabout "...identifying the relative market performance of you and your competitors...
Jan
18
awarded  Student
Jan
18
asked “You and your” vs. “Your and your”
Jan
18
awarded  Editor
Jan
18
awarded  Organizer
Jan
18
answered In the sentence below, is the apostrophe after the 's' correct?