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Jun
24
comment How is the predicate of the verb 'to diagnose' formed?
@EdwinAshworth it is confirmed by myself that the passive voice is never used ;-) I was playing along with your comment about a grammar czar. Dryden is a favorite whipping boy of Linguistics 101 lecturers.
Jun
24
comment How is the predicate of the verb 'to diagnose' formed?
@EdwinAshworth the earliest attestations of edit are after the death of John Dryden, who invented the ban on the passive voice.
Jun
24
comment How is the predicate of the verb 'to diagnose' formed?
@DanBron pea is a back-formation from pease (interpreted as a plural).
Jun
23
answered How is the predicate of the verb 'to diagnose' formed?
Jun
21
comment Is 'yeah-nah' a uniquely Australian idiom?
@hawkeye I guess I hear people saying it occasionally, and I probably say it myself. Most people wouldn't notice that they're saying it.
Jun
21
comment Is 'yeah-nah' a uniquely Australian idiom?
a similar expression is found in US English but not with the same meaning.
Jun
6
comment coffee vs. some coffee
My sense is that the first sentence usually means that you want as much coffee as will satisfy you, but the second one means that you are willing to settle for a limited serving size. Another difference: the first one can mean that the speaker wants coffee rather than other drinks, while the second doesn't imply a preference.
Jun
1
comment How to reply to “you ok” in British?
That would be strange for someone coming from the states, since in America the question presumes that you are injured or emotionally burdened somehow. If you like the person you should engage them in conversation, ask about their family, etc. if you dislike the person then you should icily reply that you are OK and then turn your head away.
May
18
comment Is “understand” always a stative verb?
semantics.uchicago.edu/scalarchange/vendler57.pdf
May
16
awarded  Generalist
May
16
comment What is the English version of the Vietnamese idiom “như cá nằm trên thớt” - “like a fish on cutting board”
@mikeTheLiar I remember reading the proposal in William Safire's book, On Language, p. 29.
May
15
answered What is the English version of the Vietnamese idiom “như cá nằm trên thớt” - “like a fish on cutting board”
May
14
revised What is the best word (or term) to identify pronouncing W's for L's and R's?
added 1 character in body
May
14
answered shaVe, shaMe, shaPe, shaDe, shaKe, shaRe --> What am I doing here? Does it have a name?
May
13
revised What is the best word (or term) to identify pronouncing W's for L's and R's?
added 278 characters in body
May
13
answered What is the best word (or term) to identify pronouncing W's for L's and R's?
May
9
answered “Aforementioned” vs. “In question”
May
6
revised Is there any English word starting with “gh” and “gh” is not pronounced as /ɡ/?
added 4 characters in body
May
6
answered Is there any English word starting with “gh” and “gh” is not pronounced as /ɡ/?
May
5
comment Is there any English word starting with “gh” and “gh” is not pronounced as /ɡ/?
of possible interest if you want to see why this is so phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/johnh/papers/labphon.pdf