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Apr
30
comment Punctuation for nested quotes at the end of a sentence
Sometimes if I want to get a little freaky I use French guillemets instead of single quotes.
Apr
20
comment Are there any formal infixes?
Yes, they have them in Tagalog and a handful of other languages.
Apr
16
comment What's the difference between “He dumped her” and “He walked out on her”?
@Mari-LouA you can count on me for a reopen vote anytime. we should form a reopen voting pool to defeat the strict editorial standards here.
Apr
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
14
answered What's the difference between “He dumped her” and “He walked out on her”?
Apr
11
answered Does the word “findability” exist in English?
Apr
1
answered What preposition properly collocates with “chuffed”?
Mar
27
comment What is the word for making a point by saying nothing?
verbum sap is the closest I can think of.
Mar
14
answered What is the grammar of the quote: “There isn't a Parallel of Latitude but thinks it would have been the Equator if it had had its rights.”?
Mar
5
revised Politically correct substitutes for (fe)male and (wo)man
added 420 characters in body
Mar
5
answered Politically correct substitutes for (fe)male and (wo)man
Feb
23
comment I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself
@deadrat I'm glad you enjoyed reading about event classes. I am presuming that the OP already knows English, and just wants to know why the first sentence sounds a little odd.
Feb
21
comment I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself
@deadrat your example works because have can be coerced to have a habitual reading (something like I maintain insurance...). Only eventive verbs can have habitual readings according to the usual teaching about event classes. The advice given to the OP is still good in general, though I don't think anyone is claiming it will work every time.
Feb
21
comment I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself
What you were told is mostly correct: the sentence sounds awkward because of the usual aspectual class of the verb. The "x in order to y" construction usually requires an eventive verb as x. In order for it to make sense, you have to understand it as "I got a bodyguard in order to..." (where get is eventive unlike stative have).
Feb
10
comment One word to refer to live streams and videos?
"content" may encompass more than you intend; "streamed content" would hit the mark.
Jan
31
comment How to punctuate a sentence starting with “what.”
I'd add that the editors @Ricky is talking about are the ones who have an actual preference, and are not merely enforcing their publication's style guide. If you are writing for a magazine or newspaper, check the style guide. No one cares if you spell it élite or elite, but a publication should pick one spelling and require it consistently.
Jan
25
comment Meaning of the phrase “Relax Into The Pain”
to respond to @FumbleFingers I'd say that language in use is only as exact as it needs to be. if as one of the responses notes, this is the kind of thing that's said during a certain gym exercise, it doesn't need to be that exact at all since the context is very particular.
Jan
24
answered Meaning of the phrase “Relax Into The Pain”
Jan
13
comment The name of this grammar structure
@cityofunited most words in English can be coordinated with "and". English is said to be "head-initial," meaning that the modifying portion of a phrase tends to come after. I have provided you with a technical term. you can probably find others in the literature. consider reading further in Huddleston&Pullum
Jan
13
answered The name of this grammar structure