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Aug
14
comment Can I omit “to” in front of every verb in a series connected by “and”?
Yes, you can do it, but stylistically it can make your writing more difficult to read.
Aug
2
comment how to pronounce “t's” sound, as in “it's” or “that's”
ts will make a hissing sound, and ch a hushing sound. it will be hard to feel where your tongue is.
Jul
28
comment Name for someone who believes that sciences is more than just descriptive
Laudan's book Science and Relativism caricatures four types of philosophers of science: pragmatist, relativist, realist and positivist. The book is a quick read if you are interested in the topic.
Jul
27
comment Single Word Request for an adjective to replace my use of the word “gay” to describe
gay people tend to find creative ways of drawing attention to social customs, so in an odd sense the word isn't all that far off. the woman could have even got the idea from a gay friend. the problem here is that you intend whatever word you choose pejoratively. since you are interested in being a nicer person, try to focus on your discomfort with melodrama rather than being more cunning in your expression.
Jul
26
answered Should thin spaces be used between numerals and units
Jul
10
comment Generic Term for Derivative of a Conceptual System
I'd go with term of art
Jul
5
comment Women in xxx country are viewed as disposable/dispensable commodities
disposable means they can be used and then discarded. dispensable means they can be sold or traded cheaply.
Jul
1
comment unreleased final consonant sounds
@JanusBahsJacquet it could just be one of the banned troll users. Who knows?
Jul
1
answered unreleased final consonant sounds
Jul
1
comment unreleased final consonant sounds
@JanusBahsJacquet I have read in SE meta that SE is to be a place for all "answers," even if such answers exist elsewhere. I think that the site should not be so hostile towards anyone admitting to having a teacher.
Jun
24
comment How is the predicate of the verb 'to diagnose' formed?
@EdwinAshworth it is confirmed by myself that the passive voice is never used ;-) I was playing along with your comment about a grammar czar. Dryden is a favorite whipping boy of Linguistics 101 lecturers.
Jun
24
comment How is the predicate of the verb 'to diagnose' formed?
@EdwinAshworth the earliest attestations of edit are after the death of John Dryden, who invented the ban on the passive voice.
Jun
24
comment How is the predicate of the verb 'to diagnose' formed?
@DanBron pea is a back-formation from pease (interpreted as a plural).
Jun
23
answered How is the predicate of the verb 'to diagnose' formed?
Jun
21
comment Is 'yeah-nah' a uniquely Australian idiom?
@hawkeye I guess I hear people saying it occasionally, and I probably say it myself. Most people wouldn't notice that they're saying it.
Jun
21
comment Is 'yeah-nah' a uniquely Australian idiom?
a similar expression is found in US English but not with the same meaning.
Jun
6
comment coffee vs. some coffee
My sense is that the first sentence usually means that you want as much coffee as will satisfy you, but the second one means that you are willing to settle for a limited serving size. Another difference: the first one can mean that the speaker wants coffee rather than other drinks, while the second doesn't imply a preference.
Jun
1
comment How to reply to “you ok” in British?
That would be strange for someone coming from the states, since in America the question presumes that you are injured or emotionally burdened somehow. If you like the person you should engage them in conversation, ask about their family, etc. if you dislike the person then you should icily reply that you are OK and then turn your head away.
May
18
comment Is “understand” always a stative verb?
semantics.uchicago.edu/scalarchange/vendler57.pdf
May
16
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