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 Yearling
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Dec
10
comment One word for a person who pretends to be nice to someone's face but makes fun of them behind their back
"You've got more faces than the town hall clock"
Nov
30
comment When did men start to lose their “virginity”?
"Before 1969" isn't a very strong upper bound.
Nov
22
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
15
comment Are there any English sayings equivalent to the Japanese proverb, “Go to bed early and wait for the good news”?
No, none of these are proverbs, so they don't relate to the question. This is English Language & Usage, not Bible Studies.
May
19
awarded  Nice Question
May
19
awarded  Popular Question
May
19
accepted Why do we fluoridate but chlorinate water?
May
19
comment Why do we fluoridate but chlorinate water?
Perhaps I'm just thinking about it too hard. In both cases, once the chemical is dissolved in the water, it's in an ionised form. Are you saying the difference is just because the 'original' chlorine is in its elemental form (i.e it's because of a chemical difference in the process, not a difference of etymology)?
May
19
asked Why do we fluoridate but chlorinate water?
May
15
answered When is a comma appropriate when using “that is”
Mar
19
comment Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
@Tristanr When was that? I think primary schools have been first-name for longer than secondary schools, but there's a lot of variation. I know some secondary schools today have pupils call teachers by their given names, but that's still quite rare in the UK.
Mar
19
comment Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
@PeterShor Yeah, I was trying to make that distinction clear at the same time as showing how things have changed here. I don't want to get too much into it, as the traditional use is only there to make the current situation easier to understand, but I've changed my answer and I hope it's clearer now.
Mar
19
revised Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
make the traditional/modern distinction clearer: it's almost like everyone is converging on US usage, but not quite
Mar
19
comment What is the English word closest to Japanese “Ganbatte,” the word for encouraging people who are in disaster, or challenging a severe ordeal?
If you say "Stiff upper lip" to someone in Britain today, they'll probably know what you mean, but think you are being very old-fashioned, maybe even making a joke. It's to do with bearing sorrow well, rather than trying hard, so doesn't fit with all uses of ganbatte.
Mar
19
answered Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
Mar
1
answered [S]he has the ears of a …?
Feb
5
accepted What does an en_GB speaker need to know to write en_AU?
Jan
30
asked What does an en_GB speaker need to know to write en_AU?
Jan
28
awarded  Commentator