433 reputation
214
bio website surreal.istic.org
location Cambridge, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 2 years
seen Nov 25 at 19:24

My speciality is computer graphics, but I've previously worked in security, virtualization, machine learning and information retrieval, distributed databases, and data visualization. For your internet stalking convenience, my website links to my profiles on other sites.


Nov
22
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
15
comment Are there any English sayings equivalent to the Japanese proverb, “Go to bed early and wait for the good news”?
No, none of these are proverbs, so they don't relate to the question. This is English Language & Usage, not Bible Studies.
May
19
awarded  Nice Question
May
19
awarded  Popular Question
May
19
accepted Why do we fluoridate but chlorinate water?
May
19
comment Why do we fluoridate but chlorinate water?
Perhaps I'm just thinking about it too hard. In both cases, once the chemical is dissolved in the water, it's in an ionised form. Are you saying the difference is just because the 'original' chlorine is in its elemental form (i.e it's because of a chemical difference in the process, not a difference of etymology)?
May
19
asked Why do we fluoridate but chlorinate water?
May
15
answered When is a comma appropriate when using “that is”
Mar
19
comment Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
@Tristanr When was that? I think primary schools have been first-name for longer than secondary schools, but there's a lot of variation. I know some secondary schools today have pupils call teachers by their given names, but that's still quite rare in the UK.
Mar
19
comment Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
@PeterShor Yeah, I was trying to make that distinction clear at the same time as showing how things have changed here. I don't want to get too much into it, as the traditional use is only there to make the current situation easier to understand, but I've changed my answer and I hope it's clearer now.
Mar
19
revised Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
make the traditional/modern distinction clearer: it's almost like everyone is converging on US usage, but not quite
Mar
19
comment What is the English word closest to Japanese “Ganbatte,” the word for encouraging people who are in disaster, or challenging a severe ordeal?
If you say "Stiff upper lip" to someone in Britain today, they'll probably know what you mean, but think you are being very old-fashioned, maybe even making a joke. It's to do with bearing sorrow well, rather than trying hard, so doesn't fit with all uses of ganbatte.
Mar
19
answered Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
Mar
1
answered [S]he has the ears of a …?
Feb
5
accepted What does an en_GB speaker need to know to write en_AU?
Jan
30
asked What does an en_GB speaker need to know to write en_AU?
Jan
28
awarded  Commentator
Nov
27
comment Can someone please explain the bolded parts to me?
It's hard to say without knowing the story, but it sounds like he had inferred (wrongly) that the dog was destroying the child, but now realises that the dog was saving the child. Perhaps he found the dog with the child in its mouth, but the dog was in fact trying to carry it to safety? It ought to be clear from the rest of the story. I really wouldn't read Twain to learn English: he wrote a lot of convoluted stuff like this, and his style is very different from how people write today.
Nov
27
comment Can someone please explain the bolded parts to me?
Yes, I think your interpretation is correct. He's saying that the dog's intelligence must be reason, because of the way it allowed the dog to save the child, and that it must be greater than his own, because he completely misunderstood what was happening. This meaning of "reason" is a little old-fashioned: it's intelligence plus the capacity for logical thought.