147 reputation
4
bio website people.usi.ch/bezerrac
location Lugano, Switzerland
age 29
visits member for 2 years
seen Oct 14 at 8:37

Dec
9
accepted Plural of composite noun?
Dec
8
revised “There is no A or B” vs “There is no A and B”
added 151 characters in body
Dec
8
revised “There is no A or B” vs “There is no A and B”
edited title
Dec
8
comment “There is no A or B” vs “There is no A and B”
Thanks, but what if the sentence is long, such as "There is no bound on message delay or relative process speed." Would this construction be correct? I think "There is neither bound on message delay nor on relative process speed" would be odd...
Dec
8
asked “There is no A or B” vs “There is no A and B”
Dec
8
asked Plural of composite noun?
Nov
29
comment Colon between “that is” and formal definition
@J.R., doesn't the fact that, in the above example, one clause explains (formally repeats) the other make them dependent?
Nov
29
comment Colon between “that is” and formal definition
@PeterShor, you mean I should just write "(...) accessed by C, γ = (...)"? I don't see how to avoid rephrasing the definition completely when removing "that is".
Nov
28
accepted Colon between “that is” and formal definition
Nov
28
comment Colon between “that is” and formal definition
I meant to ask if it was alright to use this kind of punctuation when defining something formally. I edited the question accordingly.
Nov
28
revised Colon between “that is” and formal definition
deleted 22 characters in body
Nov
28
comment Colon between “that is” and formal definition
I don't think so. The mathematical example is just an illustration of a formal definition. It could be applied to any other formal text. The question is solely about how to write properly such a definition in the English language.
Nov
28
asked Colon between “that is” and formal definition
Nov
17
awarded  Supporter
Nov
17
accepted “A depends on B and C” or "A depends on B and on C?
Nov
16
comment “A depends on B and C” or "A depends on B and on C?
So there is no style rule saying which one is preferred, in the second example?
Nov
16
revised “A depends on B and C” or "A depends on B and on C?
added 12 characters in body
Nov
16
awarded  Scholar
Nov
16
awarded  Editor
Nov
16
revised “A depends on B and C” or "A depends on B and on C?
account for Jim's comment and clarify the original question I had in mind