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Dec
2
awarded  Yearling
Mar
12
comment what's the difference between “apparent”, “evident” and “obvious”?
@JohnM.Landsberg not sure why you think only one is correct in Q3. It is clear that you have been cheated. It is apparent that you have been cheated. It is regretful that you have been cheated. All of these work equally well, no matter how the question is formulated.
Mar
11
comment what's the difference between “apparent”, “evident” and “obvious”?
@jwpat7 "It is stupid that he ____" is acceptable although informal. It yields .4 mil results on Google if that tells you anything.
Mar
11
comment what's the difference between “apparent”, “evident” and “obvious”?
@JohnM.Landsberg --agreed on differentiation (however slight), but the test does not ask to differentiate. The choices given are all more or less correct, with the exception of two.
Mar
11
awarded  Commentator
Mar
11
comment what's the difference between “apparent”, “evident” and “obvious”?
I am sorry to say, the people who wrote that test do not speak English well. All of the options are plausible, except for 2.D and 3.D.
Mar
11
answered what's the difference between “apparent”, “evident” and “obvious”?
Mar
7
revised “I don't know” is to “agnostic” as “I don't care” is to what adjective?
link cleanup
Mar
7
suggested suggested edit on “I don't know” is to “agnostic” as “I don't care” is to what adjective?
Feb
11
awarded  Critic
Feb
11
awarded  Supporter
Feb
11
comment Question Regarding Possessives with ('s) and (of)
Shawn, consider He is a friend of Moses and He is a friend of Obama. Both are perfectly acceptable and more common than what you are calling the "correct" construction.
Feb
11
answered Is there a better way to refer to “Real Life” when chatting online?
Feb
11
comment Question Regarding Possessives with ('s) and (of)
Agreed with Hanna for the most part. As to Geek's comment: please read my answer carefully. At no part did I say anything goes. Both of the suggested usages are well-attested in the written record. Moreover, expert opinion allows for both single and double possessives (for the same reason: good writers in English use both). There is no rule governing this case however. "A friend of me" is ten times less common than "a friend of mine," for example. Why? Because that's the way people speak--quite different form "anything goes."
Feb
10
comment Question Regarding Possessives with ('s) and (of)
The problem is with your insistence on "proper" and "correct," which I thought needed to be addressed. Otherwise, both are common and sanctioned by experts.
Feb
10
comment Question Regarding Possessives with ('s) and (of)
I respectfully disagree. If you cannot be bothered to read eight sentences, you are in the wrong place. And even then, I separated the answer into a separate paragraph.
Feb
10
answered Question Regarding Possessives with ('s) and (of)
Jan
25
awarded  Analytical
Jan
25
awarded  Informed
Jan
24
comment Can I grow some gratitude?
I see your point, but I don't think there is any disagreement. The template is "grow some x", which of course means different things depending on what x is. What I want the OP to understand is that "growing gratitude" is not idiomatic or natural in English, along with suggesting some reasons as to why that might be the case.