279 reputation
16
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location Brussels, Belgium
age 40
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen Sep 22 '13 at 17:25

Nov
13
awarded  Yearling
Jan
29
comment What do you call a person who hates everyone but himself?
Raj, your question implies that someone is expected to hate himself, that if he hated himself in addition to everyone else, everything would be as it should be. Is this your intended meaning?
Jan
14
awarded  Quorum
Jan
14
answered Looking for a formal equivalent phrase for the adverb “personally”
Jan
2
comment “Kill”, “murder” or “slay”
Yes. The commandment in the Hebrew bible is against murder, not killing as such. Lawful putting to death was not prohibited.
Dec
30
answered 'Horeca', is it English? Alternatives?
Dec
23
comment “Unsociable” vs. “unsocial” in the following sentence
No, you're right. I just reread it.
Dec
23
comment “Dabbler”, without the negative connotation
I think amateur is right because its root is the Latin verb amo i.e. to love. The trouble is that we tend to see amateur these days as meaning unprofessional/incompetent whereas it simply means that for the person in question the activity is a labour of love i.e. what the OP means.
Dec
23
awarded  Commentator
Dec
23
comment “Unsociable” vs. “unsocial” in the following sentence
I think the reason both are used is that the writer wants to convey both a lack of interest in the group as well as an active hostility towards it. As demonstrated below, the words' meanings are not set in stone. However, by using both words the writer is making clear he/she means passive/tacit rejection of or distance from the group as well as an outright rejection of it.
Dec
23
comment “Unsociable” vs. “unsocial” in the following sentence
The -able prefix suggests an impossibility of the subject being the recipient of the action. Unsociable suggests you cannot socialise with the person e.g. because the he/she is unfriendly, not interested in social interaction etc. Unsocial simply means the subject is not social i.e. doesn't reach out to others, doesn't respond etc.
Dec
17
comment Is the proper spelling “judgment” or “judgement”?
"Acknowledgment" too. Any others?
Dec
17
answered “Pitcher” or “Pitchee” when referring to oneself in a submission form
Dec
16
awarded  Editor
Dec
16
comment Is an acronym is always pronounced as a single word?
I suspect that it has to do with the fact that both GNU and PHP are IT-related and there is a clear link between the two i.e. PHP typically runs on Apache servers on Linux, an operating system that has its roots in GNU and is sometimes called GNU/Linux. When PHP was first given its current meaning it was done so in a server-centric computer world that was familiar with the recursive acronym GNU. So they used "recursive acronym" by analogy to describe what PHP is in grammatical terms.
Dec
16
revised Is an acronym is always pronounced as a single word?
added 1 characters in body
Dec
16
comment Is an acronym is always pronounced as a single word?
As with many things in English there is a lack of consensus. I would say an acronym should be pronounced as a single word but it's not a canonical answer. Right and wrong is defined by usage in English, since there is no Académie Anglaise (not that the French listen to the Académie Française any more). Usage in this case seems divided. However, it does appear that more people are in favour of it being pronounced as a single word.
Dec
16
answered Is an acronym is always pronounced as a single word?
Dec
16
comment Is an acronym is always pronounced as a single word?
PHP is a recursive acronym because it's currently an abbreviation of PHP Hypertext Preprocessor i.e. the P in PHP stands for PHP. Originally it stood for Personal Home Page. Another recursive acronym is GNU i.e. GNU is not Unix.
Dec
16
comment Should the number “0” be pronounced “zero” or “oh”?
Note that "0" in a sports score is pronounced "nil" in British English but "nothing" in American English e.g. the Steelers beat the Cowboys 52-0 (fifty-two nothing).