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Native English and Welsh speaker, enthusiastic learner of Flemish/Dutch, French, German, and occasionally Italian.

My doctorate is in medieval English. I taught as a college lecturer in Oxford for about five years, before taking a position as a researcher in the field of English linguistic history with a major publisher. I then went over to the dark side (for the cookies, of course), and now work as a data analyst for the same company, mainly dealing with XML data (and therefore XSLT), but also branching out into Adobe CS6 and all its wonders. I'm really grateful for any and all help as I learn all this new tech, and I'm always happy to return the favour by giving linguistic help when I can.


Nov
13
awarded  Yearling
Nov
13
answered Appointment in one year
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
29
comment “-ing” verb + gerund
Thanks, Edwin! I've added a couple of web references - I think the University of Toronto one should be pretty authoritative, and the other has some interesting content so I've added it as well.
Aug
29
revised “-ing” verb + gerund
Added some references
Aug
29
answered “-ing” verb + gerund
Jul
10
answered What does “on the couch” mean?
Nov
13
awarded  Yearling
May
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
27
comment Is “my place” correct and common in British English?
I'd qualify Will Hunting's response, and say that "my place" is an informal way of saying "the place where I currently live", and that a more formal alternative would have to be context-specific - "my house", "my flat", "my apartment", depending on the type of place in which you live. "My residence" is not just formal, it's pretty much archaic in anything other than technical language, or as a joke.
Nov
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
19
revised Is it “thousands of postmen and women” or “thousands of postmen and -women”?
Added U.S. variant.
Nov
19
comment Is it “thousands of postmen and women” or “thousands of postmen and -women”?
@FeralOink: "mailcarriers" doesn't work in British English, where "postal workers" would be the commonest gender-neutral term, so it just depends on the OP's audience. But I take your point - a "postal worker" could also refer to someone who works in the office, not just to someone who carries the post, so "mailcarrier" feels less ambiguous.
Nov
19
answered Is it “thousands of postmen and women” or “thousands of postmen and -women”?
Nov
16
comment “In” vs. “out of”
@PeterShor: I guess that, because they base their definitions on evidence of usage, they just didn't find enough evidence of its use in formal American writing yet. I can imagine that changing pretty quickly, given how widespread you say the use now is. But perhaps someone should write in and question the tag?
Nov
16
comment Is this 'as' a conjunction?
Hmmm... Interesting. I've certainly seen it often-ish in online ESL materials, but not having an ESL background myself my knowledge is second-hand. I wonder whether it's just a way of simplifying the terminology of "relative clause"? If the two are synonymous, of course, "as he called them" would not count as an "adjective clause" because it is not a relative clause.
Nov
16
revised Is this 'as' a conjunction?
Clarificiation
Nov
16
comment Is this 'as' a conjunction?
I meant "school" in a general sense - one view of grammar, or one way of looking at grammar, if you like. You'll find the term "adjective clause" in ESL teaching, in particular. From memory, I believe it's usually used of relative clauses modifying nouns, but this special type of "as-clause" could also be interpreted in the same way because it's a subordinate clause that modifies a noun. I've edited my answer to clarify. Thanks for the input!
Nov
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
16
answered Is this 'as' a conjunction?