Reputation
5,887
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
15 46
Impact
~376k people reached

Jun
5
revised “jotted down” or “written down”
edited title
Jun
3
answered What's an accurate term for “technical terminology” in the sentence:
Jun
3
comment “X is subject to Y” or “X is subjected to Y”?
This is a helpful distinction because I hear the phrasal verb when I hear "subject to".
May
30
answered What is the origin of the phrase “hot take”?
May
27
comment Hypernym for “bark”, “meow”, “roar”
I can't speak for all cats, but the ones I know seem to be calling me (for want of food or attention mainly) with their meows. As to the use of the term “cat call", I agree that it probably doesn't call a meow to mind, but the utterance of a cat is where it comes from. While I would probably just call it a cat “sound ", as a hypernym that word is not useful.
May
27
comment Hypernym for “bark”, “meow”, “roar”
@TusharRaj: I'm not sure what sense you're implying. The word in question is "call".
May
27
comment Hypernym for “bark”, “meow”, “roar”
"Call", as in "bird call" or "cat call", refers to the sound each animal makes.
May
26
comment What is the meaning of “old sport”?
Do you have any intel as to the origins of the phrase? How old it is? I'd like to know if, in thinking about Gatsby, he's using a tired out phrase or something that still has some relevance.
May
26
comment Are prior, previous, and preceding interchangeable?
Given moments A, B, C, and D, could it be perceived as a mistake on my part, namely that I am simply forgetting moment A, if I refer to "the previous/preceding two moments"?
May
25
comment Are prior, previous, and preceding interchangeable?
Thanks for the OED info. "Moment D is the same as the two moments immediately preceding it" then? Is that the best option? Or should I go with "prior to" or previous to" it? (I need to keep Moment D the subject in my phrasing.)
May
25
asked Are prior, previous, and preceding interchangeable?
May
21
awarded  Notable Question
May
14
comment “More so” or moreso?
In my opinion, this answer owes too much to the Grammarist post cited elsewhere in this question without giving proper credit.
May
10
comment Is the misuse of “literally” an example of a malapropism?
@robusto I accepted no such answer. I upvoted, which is all. I see that it's been accepted. I think it's my phone which is laggy and scrolls slowly.
Apr
29
reviewed Approve Neoclassical Neologisms
Apr
24
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
17
comment When is it appropriate to use 'admixture' rather than 'mixture'?
@FumbleFingers (dropping the sledgehammer)
Apr
16
comment What a word for “navigate” that's more commonly associated with land?
I like orientate real well. It is a BrE spelling though, right?
Apr
15
answered What a word for “navigate” that's more commonly associated with land?
Apr
9
comment We might have to do some “fiddling”
I can say that, as an American, my first reaction to the fiddle=swindle question was: must be BrE. I've never heard or read it in this context. Only in the sense of "tinker".