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Aug
16
revised Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
deleted 1 character in body
Aug
2
revised Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
added 76 characters in body
Aug
2
comment Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
@JEL I didn't mean the thing about conventional grammar to sound slighting. I mean to say that there is enough of style in this question to assess it on those terms, which I've tried to do.
Aug
2
comment Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
@PeterShor, I think fungibility owes in part to two things. One, the reality of the antecedent in question (is there literally only one of it), and, two, the use of determiners that place greater emphasis of singularity on the antecedent. See: This clown vs. A clown.
Aug
2
comment Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
@JEL I never mentioned anything about grammaticality other than to acknowledge the basic antecedent-pronoun relationship. I am referring to the discordance a person hears when the agreement is extended too far. That's not a grammatical issue at all. It's euphonic and stylistic. And, as you'll note if you peruse enough answers on this site, conventional grammar is not always the most useful term to assess correctness or acceptability.
Aug
1
comment Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
But there aren't two of the last example.
Aug
1
revised Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
added 70 characters in body
Aug
1
answered Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
Jun
5
revised “jotted down” or “written down”
edited title
Jun
3
answered What's an accurate term for “technical terminology” in the sentence:
Jun
3
comment “X is subject to Y” or “X is subjected to Y”?
This is a helpful distinction because I hear the phrasal verb when I hear "subject to".
May
30
answered What is the origin of the phrase “hot take”?
May
27
comment Hypernym for “bark”, “meow”, “roar”
I can't speak for all cats, but the ones I know seem to be calling me (for want of food or attention mainly) with their meows. As to the use of the term “cat call", I agree that it probably doesn't call a meow to mind, but the utterance of a cat is where it comes from. While I would probably just call it a cat “sound ", as a hypernym that word is not useful.
May
27
comment Hypernym for “bark”, “meow”, “roar”
@TusharRaj: I'm not sure what sense you're implying. The word in question is "call".
May
27
comment Hypernym for “bark”, “meow”, “roar”
"Call", as in "bird call" or "cat call", refers to the sound each animal makes.
May
26
comment What is the meaning of “old sport”?
Do you have any intel as to the origins of the phrase? How old it is? I'd like to know if, in thinking about Gatsby, he's using a tired out phrase or something that still has some relevance.
May
26
comment Are prior, previous, and preceding interchangeable?
Given moments A, B, C, and D, could it be perceived as a mistake on my part, namely that I am simply forgetting moment A, if I refer to "the previous/preceding two moments"?
May
25
comment Are prior, previous, and preceding interchangeable?
Thanks for the OED info. "Moment D is the same as the two moments immediately preceding it" then? Is that the best option? Or should I go with "prior to" or previous to" it? (I need to keep Moment D the subject in my phrasing.)
May
25
asked Are prior, previous, and preceding interchangeable?
May
21
awarded  Notable Question