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Dec
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answered Word Request: In the manner in which it was written
Dec
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revised Using “whale” as a verb
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comment What adjective would you choose if you want to elevate a workaholic to a higher degree?
Workaholic has a somewhat negative connotation, like the person works so much that they neglect other elements of their life. Like they're out of balance in an unhealthy way. Do you want to convey that or do you just want to convey that the person works very hard?
Oct
20
revised Word for lover of war, beginning with a B?
edited body
Oct
17
answered How do I say that I went down and came back up the water while drowning?
Sep
23
reviewed Leave Open Is there an idiom for when you ask someone for help, and instead the person blames you?
Sep
12
comment What is the difference between disaster, catastrophe, and calamity?
@Barmar If you think my comment is not useful, flag it for a moderator or give me meaningful feedback. Otherwise, understand that I am giving the Aristotlean meaning to provide a little context. That in the same way that you might provide some constructive feedback to a person looking for the difference between destroy and decimate.
Sep
11
comment What is the difference between disaster, catastrophe, and calamity?
Catastrophe has a very specific meaning, deriving from Aristotle. Paraphrasing him, the catastrophe is an element of a tragedy and comes directly from the hero's realization of his or her tragic flaw. It represents the demise of that hero and those people around them, and it precipitates the conclusion of the tragedy. Literally, it means an "overturning". We retain mainly this sense of it in contemporary usage.
Sep
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Aug
16
revised Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
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Aug
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revised Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
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Aug
2
comment Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
@JEL I didn't mean the thing about conventional grammar to sound slighting. I mean to say that there is enough of style in this question to assess it on those terms, which I've tried to do.
Aug
2
comment Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
@PeterShor, I think fungibility owes in part to two things. One, the reality of the antecedent in question (is there literally only one of it), and, two, the use of determiners that place greater emphasis of singularity on the antecedent. See: This clown vs. A clown.
Aug
2
comment Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
@JEL I never mentioned anything about grammaticality other than to acknowledge the basic antecedent-pronoun relationship. I am referring to the discordance a person hears when the agreement is extended too far. That's not a grammatical issue at all. It's euphonic and stylistic. And, as you'll note if you peruse enough answers on this site, conventional grammar is not always the most useful term to assess correctness or acceptability.