476 reputation
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location Vermont, USA
age 36
visits member for 2 years
seen 11 hours ago

StackOverflow: JavaScript/HTML/C#/ASP.NET MVC

English Language: I love languages and have studied enough English and Latin to almost always be wrong.


Nov
11
comment Does bit (information) have a plural
I'm not sure I follow If "bit" is used like a unit of measurement, then it should mostly be used in its singular forms. What units of measure behave this way? Consider one meter vs. twenty meters, one gram vs. twenty grams, one liter vs. twenty liters.
Nov
11
comment Is there a word for “exactly the most one can handle without being overwhelming”?
Tremendous answer.
Nov
10
comment Pronunciation of 'aunt' in the US
Some people I've known with particularly thick Vermont accents pronounce it similarly to "aren't," with a distinct "r" sound. It must be fairly rare since it isn't an option on the splatter chart and there are no instances of "other" in VT.
Nov
10
comment Pronunciation of 'aunt' in the US
@PeterShor the name of my home state (Vermont) rhymes with both aunt and taunt when I say them. I do live very close to Canada, though.
Nov
10
comment “Jimmy did his homework and so didn't his brother” Is this correct?
I live in Vermont (Western New England) and this is pretty common here, too.
Nov
9
comment English words for specific positive integers (e.g. dozen, score, gross, myriad)
@ArmenԾիրունյան quartet and up (to me) suggest musical ensembles specifically, while duo and trio suggest two and three people/things more generally (a "dynamic duo" springs to mind). This may just be my bias -- I'm certainly not an authority. Good question!
Nov
7
comment Should this use of “est.” be “etc.” instead?
I often hear "et cetera" pronounced "eccetera." I suspect that contributes to how common the misspelling "ect" is.
Nov
7
comment Do you use the masculine or feminine with “victim”?
@curiousdannii very good point. In the southern US "y'all" is commonly used as the plural form of "you," but up north I'd sound ridiculous saying it. I'm surprised to see so much support for "their," but your tip makes it much easier for me to swallow. Thanks.
Nov
6
comment Sublime: I think my understanding of this word is a little off, help please?
Something could be "achingly beautiful", but by itself "aching" doesn't really fit the bill.
Nov
4
comment Rose “to a crescendo” or “in a crescendo”?
@KristinaLopez lovely example.
Nov
4
comment Is it more correct to say “repeat”, or “resay”?
Pete and Re-Pete were in a boat. Pete fell out; who was left?
Nov
4
comment What is the first part of a joke called?
@ChrisCudmore bravo.
Nov
3
comment What is someone called who makes and sells sandwiches?
@corsiKa that's an interesting point about the executive chefs.
Nov
3
comment “to bath” vs “to bathe”
@Andy I also have never heard swimming called bathing, although when I go swimming I wear a bathing suit.
Nov
3
comment “to bath” vs “to bathe”
Somewhat off-topic, but it seems like "have a bath" is more common than "take a bath" outside the US. It sounds odd to me in a very charming way. Also, do Brits call the clothes worn to go swimming a bathing suit?
Nov
3
comment What is someone called who makes and sells sandwiches?
@JoeZ. I agree they're not bad, but works of art they are not. I was overly harsh in my answer and I'll correct it. :)
Oct
27
comment A word that means suffering great loss if failed but highly profitable if successful?
High-stakes was the first thing that came to mind for me.
Oct
15
comment What's the difference between 'addictive' and 'addicting'?
I can remember hearing "addicting" as an adjective in grade school here in the US some 25-30 years ago. It bothered me then but I've gotten used to it over the years and have even caught myself using it a time or two.
Oct
13
comment When and where did “spanking” begin to be used as an adjective?
Your example "brand spanking new" is the only use of "spanking" as an adjective that sounds right to my American ears.
Sep
26
comment Is it still an “ice cream cone” if it doesn't have ice cream?
I haven't played baseball in years and have never played tennis, but I wear a baseball cap and tennis shoes almost every day.