476 reputation
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location Vermont, USA
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen 2 days ago

StackOverflow: JavaScript/HTML/C#/ASP.NET MVC

English Language: I love languages and have studied enough English and Latin to almost always be wrong.


Dec
5
comment Difference between “buy” and “purchase”
@WS2 'words' rather than 'grammar' are the essence of our tongue is an intriguing idea. Can you recommend any literature on the topic?
Nov
28
answered Adjective for someone who is an a-hole?
Nov
20
awarded  Critic
Nov
19
answered A word that means that something is not real but feels real
Nov
11
comment Does bit (information) have a plural
I'm not sure I follow If "bit" is used like a unit of measurement, then it should mostly be used in its singular forms. What units of measure behave this way? Consider one meter vs. twenty meters, one gram vs. twenty grams, one liter vs. twenty liters.
Nov
11
comment Is there a word for “exactly the most one can handle without being overwhelming”?
Tremendous answer.
Nov
11
awarded  Yearling
Nov
10
comment Pronunciation of 'aunt' in the US
Some people I've known with particularly thick Vermont accents pronounce it similarly to "aren't," with a distinct "r" sound. It must be fairly rare since it isn't an option on the splatter chart and there are no instances of "other" in VT.
Nov
10
comment Pronunciation of 'aunt' in the US
@PeterShor the name of my home state (Vermont) rhymes with both aunt and taunt when I say them. I do live very close to Canada, though.
Nov
10
comment “Jimmy did his homework and so didn't his brother” Is this correct?
I live in Vermont (Western New England) and this is pretty common here, too.
Nov
9
comment English words for specific positive integers (e.g. dozen, score, gross, myriad)
@ArmenԾիրունյան quartet and up (to me) suggest musical ensembles specifically, while duo and trio suggest two and three people/things more generally (a "dynamic duo" springs to mind). This may just be my bias -- I'm certainly not an authority. Good question!
Nov
9
answered English words for specific positive integers (e.g. dozen, score, gross, myriad)
Nov
7
answered Future Seen from the Past
Nov
7
comment Should this use of “est.” be “etc.” instead?
I often hear "et cetera" pronounced "eccetera." I suspect that contributes to how common the misspelling "ect" is.
Nov
7
comment Do you use the masculine or feminine with “victim”?
@curiousdannii very good point. In the southern US "y'all" is commonly used as the plural form of "you," but up north I'd sound ridiculous saying it. I'm surprised to see so much support for "their," but your tip makes it much easier for me to swallow. Thanks.
Nov
6
answered Do you use the masculine or feminine with “victim”?
Nov
6
comment Sublime: I think my understanding of this word is a little off, help please?
Something could be "achingly beautiful", but by itself "aching" doesn't really fit the bill.
Nov
4
comment Rose “to a crescendo” or “in a crescendo”?
@KristinaLopez lovely example.
Nov
4
comment Is it more correct to say “repeat”, or “resay”?
Pete and Re-Pete were in a boat. Pete fell out; who was left?
Nov
4
answered What is the word for “inclined to vote in an election”?