418 reputation
1411
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Mar 25 at 14:19

Nov
11
comment Word meaning “the act of intending to do nothing”
Has no one mentioned "laissez-faire" (in its original French sense) yet? I sometimes refer to it as lazy/fair, because that's my opinion of its effect on the economy (lazy government = do nothing = fair).
Nov
6
comment Did the word “evolution” exist before Darwinism?
I thought Darwin called it "descent with modification"?
Oct
21
comment How to say “I must nothing” on a t-shirt
A giant Greek letter phi.
Oct
21
comment Word for “all the groups an item belongs to”?
The concept of "transitive closure" or "reachability" may apply here.
Sep
11
comment Does “split” necessarily mean 50/50?
I think that would be "split in halves". Since "split in two" means "split into two pieces", wouldn't "split in half" mean "split into half pieces", which doesn't quite seem correct.
Sep
11
comment Does “split” necessarily mean 50/50?
Actually, is 'split in half' valid or should it be 'split in two'? (snarky mathematician comment!)
May
5
comment Largest open-source dictionary w/ brief definitions (not wiktionary)
wordlist.sourceforge.net
Apr
7
comment “Upper-case” is to “capital” as “lowercase” is to what?
Computer geeks informally say "no caps"
Mar
25
comment Gender-independent replacement for “fiancée” and “fiancé”
@Kosmonaut How about bride/groom? (not "spouse", since that's after they're married).
Mar
24
comment Gender-independent replacement for “fiancée” and “fiancé”
Is there one for aunt/uncle? Do gender neutral terms necessarily exist in all cases?
Mar
6
comment What is a female ass called?
..... an assette ;)
Feb
2
comment Is there an informal way to describe a woman that can not have a baby?
Maybe it was simultaneous editing... my first time!
Jan
3
comment The word 'not' often doesn't mean total negation in mathematical sense?
@Rahul Thanks! I think this is exactly what I was seeing. The use of "not" as an understatement to indicate a strongly opposite quality, not merely negating an adjective.
Dec
28
comment The word 'not' often doesn't mean total negation in mathematical sense?
If you're saying "not a cheap hamburger" and "hamburger" have the same meaning, I disagree. The former suggests the hamburger is expensive or overpriced.
Dec
28
comment “More perfect” versus “less imperfect”
Thanks! I realized that myself later when I replaces "perfect" with "happy". Does this argument work for "unique"? The number of existing "copies" of something is a natural number between 0 and infinity (a discretum, not a continuum), so could "more unique" mean "closer to having 1 instance"? Of course, that would have the weird consequence that a 1-of-a-kind item would be more unique than an item that no longer exists.
Dec
28
comment The word 'not' often doesn't mean total negation in mathematical sense?
I might be misunderstanding, but MENSA isn't claiming the sentences are true. They're only claiming the sentences are equivalent: if you believe one, you must believe the other. Are you saying the falseness of the statement makes a difference? I suppose you could mathematically argue that two false sentences are equivalent, but that seems like a copout.
Dec
28
comment Are double negatives proper English (e.g. “I don't know nothing”)?
I think this assumes language is parenthesizeable, so that "I don't know nothing" = "I don't (know nothing)". However, as many note, we really can't treat linguistic statements as straight mathematical statements. For example, "hot dog" is a single word, not a warm canine.
Dec
25
comment How do you remember the difference between a “stalactite” and a “stalagmite”?
I was right: spelunking IS a dirty word.
Dec
25
comment Is 'uniquer' a word?
Thanks! This seems to be the most useful answer. It appears that 'uniquer' is a word, but 'more unique' is preferred, and is itself disputed (as to whether 'unique' is comparable).
Dec
23
comment How do you remember the difference between a “stalactite” and a “stalagmite”?
I was VERY tempted to give this one the check mark... if only the British didn't have the expression "tits up" (which means things have gone horribly wrong, so "tits down" is presumably good... but that's a long chain for a mnemonic)