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Feb
6
comment What word describes something that can move orthogonally and diagonally?
@Rainbolt Naa, no way. You're loosing the oh-so-crucial information about equidistant partitioning into eight available directions. (Seriously, though, I believe your term is much less eye-brows-raisable, hehe.)
Feb
5
comment What word describes something that can move orthogonally and diagonally?
@Rainbolt 45-degrees-increment-based-holonomic, then? There's probably some weird planet where this term is commonly used, hehe.
Feb
5
comment What word describes something that can move orthogonally and diagonally?
@yo'Well, the reply I was commenting on opened for the scientific lingo, so I felt it was called for. But generally speaking, I agree with you. It's so seldom used that there's little risk there's an non-mathematical term for it anyway.
Feb
4
comment What word describes something that can move orthogonally and diagonally?
Mathematically speaking, it's too relaxed. Consider the horie's move. Effectively, it moves radially too but it's eight direction are not equidistantly spread (or, even more exact, they are offset from the queen's movement angles by an angle).
Feb
4
comment What word describes something that can move orthogonally and diagonally?
But that applies in a 2-dimensional world. What would it be called in 3D, or even better - nD?
Jan
6
comment Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged?
@miltonaut Oh, I see it now. I was misled by the equality sign, you see. Definition-wise speaking "being fine" isn't equal to "being sexy". The first is a superset to the latter. But that's a nerdy mathematics being nitpicking, so you need not to worry about that. :)
Jan
5
comment Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged?
@Ajedi32 Of course. I missed that, somehow... Thanks!
Jan
5
comment Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged?
The first one lacks the predicate, hence not being a full sentence, right?
Jan
5
comment Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged?
@miltonaut Shouldn't there be a comma for that to work? "I know your, sexy." And, now that I think about it, it should be "*I know yours, sexy.", so perhaps I'm misunderstanding the grammatical trickery.
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Oct
20
comment What is the opposite of mass-transit?
@Mitch Walking/biking is excluded from the super set because both compete with cars (and such) but also with busses (and such). One can bike/drive as well as bike/bussify. However, you hit the nail on the other thing - I'm thinking of the funding method, not the occupancy (although, I didn't realize that until now, because contemporarily those happen to coincide). Very well thought and deep analysis of the question. Hats off to you.
Oct
20
comment What is the opposite of mass-transit?
@Mitch Very keen observation. Just to be clear - some of these need to be excluded because they can't be included in the super set you mentioned. I need to express "not an element belonging to the collective means of daily commute". The unusual means shouldn't be in the super set. Walking/bikecycling collides with both the collective means and not-collective ones. Hence the exclusion. But in principle, you've got it right.
Oct
16
revised What is the opposite of mass-transit?
rolled back to a previous revision
Oct
13
comment What is the opposite of mass-transit?
@ermanen I excluded e.g. taxis because those are very rarely used for commuting to work. However, in the case that they were frequently used, I'd add them to the opposite of mass-transit, hence classifying them as private but still not own transportation. Just to be clear - are you suggesting that the marked answer isn't the best one? Would you like me to reconsider?