36,836 reputation
264141
bio website paleografie.tk
location Amsterdam, Netherlands
age
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 1 hour ago

1h
revised Begin Sentence with Gerund
added 123 characters in body
22h
comment Why 'aye aye sir' instead of 'yes sir' in naval response?
The origin of aye is unknown. The most likely hypothesis is that it is from a, ay, an word meaning "ever" in older English (vide Oxford English Dictionary); but there appears to be no consensus.
2d
comment Can a sentence have an indirect object without a direct object?
@jlovegren: Yes, I think that is an excellent description! I don't think we have a word for "type of argument" in this sense.
2d
comment Can a sentence have an indirect object without a direct object?
@jlovegren They are mostly the same as in English: the term is used for all languages, not just to describe Dutch—but we also include anything with for/voor that indicates a recipient, such as this letter is for you / deze brief is voor jou. My translation of the other examples: ik gaf Caesar een boek, ik gaf het aan Caesar, ik misgunde hem zijn geluk, de Oudheid week voor de Middeleeuwen. Note that the last one is less literal. So it is a bit of a complicated label. Perhaps it is syntacto-semantic after all...perhaps it should be abolished altogether...
2d
comment Can a sentence have an indirect object without a direct object?
Hmm that is interesting, because, in Dutch, we have a term meewerkend voorwerp, roughly "coöperating object", which includes I gave Caesar a book, I gave it to Caesar, I begrudged him his luck, Antiquity surrendered to the Middle Ages, etc. Not all of those are indirect objects, nor are they all true recipients. It is a syntactic category with a strong connection to semantics, but it is not defined semantically. It seems English does not have such a term.
Oct
17
comment What adjective do you use to describe a curve that's very curved?"
By the way, there is nothing wrong with a sharp curve. But a closed curve is like a circle: it has no "ends".
Oct
17
revised Should add a comma before 'though' in the following case?
added 353 characters in body
Oct
17
comment Should add a comma before 'though' in the following case?
@janoChen: You have two complete sentences with a subject and a finite verb: he wasn't resting and I was sure. In most cases, you cannot connect two complete sentence with a mere comma: you need a semicolon, a conjunction, a relative pronoun, or a dash (which signifies an anacoluthon, a break of syntax). [I have added this to my answer.]
Oct
17
answered Should add a comma before 'though' in the following case?
Oct
14
comment Does the phrase “begging the question” make any sense?
Hmm your answer has a ring of truth about it, although I am not familiar enough with Aristotelic (and Thomist?) traditions to be sure. Those elements that I know more about seem to be correct. Of course you are under no obligation to do so, but something of a source or a quotation would be nice. Oh, and you have one more instance of aitein that you may want to change, and you have one /em> lacking a <. Oh, and you might want to split your answer into several paragraphs for readability. Oh, and welcome to the site!
Oct
14
comment Does the phrase “begging the question” make any sense?
However, peto can also mean "to try to reach, to be on one's way towards". In that sense, petitio principii can mean "(trying to) go (back) to the beginning". But the translator did not fully grasp this and translated it in a clumsy way, with a Latinism, as Peter suggested. This is quite close to the sense of "claim" he gave.
Oct
14
comment Adjective meaning stubborn or willfully ignorant, to one's detriment
Another related word is foolhardy.
Oct
9
comment What's the opposite of “pro bono”?
@ChrisW: Mmm not really, one can only intervene pro se "for oneself". But it is possible that suo agrees with some (elliptical) noun, and that the infinitive is independent of pro: then it can work, but it would mean something else.
Oct
9
comment What's the opposite of “pro bono”?
@SvenYargs: That is lamentable...if only the Lord Justice had chosen to employ proper Latin!
Oct
8
comment What's the opposite of “pro bono”?
@hoc_age: I supported a previous Latin proposal, but it never took off, there were too few people who were interested...
Oct
8
comment What's the opposite of “pro bono”?
So, in other words, your suggestion *pro interesse suo is not possible. I understand that this phrase was coined by you but by a certain lawyer, but I have to say it makes a classicist cringe.
Oct
8
comment What's the opposite of “pro bono”?
@ChrisW: "Therefore it's not a noun with an ablative case"? I'm not sure what you mean, but you cannot use an infinitive after a preposition: you'd have to use a gerund, but there is no gerund of esse, so it is not possible. Further, pro in this case probably means in defence of, which you cannot use with your own interests; it would probably have to be a dative of purpose. Lastly, only the third person interest normally means "be of interest"; normally the verb means "be between, be among, be present at", and the sense "be of interest" requires special conditions.
Oct
8
comment What's the opposite of “pro bono”?
Why pro interesse? I do not believe that is correct syntactically?
Oct
8
comment What's the opposite of “pro bono”?
@AndrewLeach: Pro mālo would mean "for an apple", which would make sense in Dutch, where the expression voor een appel en een ei ("for an apple and an egg") means "for very little money". Pro mălo would mean "in exchange for something bad, for disaster".
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer