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comment Using to + gerund and to + invinitive
possible duplicate of When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive?
Jun
23
comment Relative adverbs
Could you be more specific about why you don't understand this? It modifies married as an adverb, there isn't really a "why" about it. Where functions just like there; both refer back to a church and modify the verb of the second clause, but there is demonstrative and part of a main clause, whereas where introduces a subordinate clause. Just like when/then and after which / afterwards (in a way). There are relative pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs.
Jun
16
comment is it gerund or participle?
With all due respect, but I think you missed my point. You converted a participial construction into a when seeing construction. I converted a gerundial construction into exactly the same. So you can convert either construction into a when seeing construction, which means that the conversion cannot be used to prove anything. Agreed? (What is more, the participial construction isn't really a shortening of anything: it's just a different construction. But I don't think you meant that "shortening" literally.)
Jun
16
comment is it gerund or participle?
Upon seeing the tiger: this is a gerundial construction, but it can just as easily be converted into a conjunctive construction such as your when seeing the tiger. I don't think this kind of conversion proves much?
Jun
15
answered is it gerund or participle?
Jun
12
comment Why is there no form of “do” in questions of the type “who knows?”
@Cerberus: To pick up an ancient comment train, how is do-support tied to inversion? Either can occur on its own? They're far from accidents in this example, but I'm not sure how to describe their connexion here.
Jun
12
revised Why is there no form of “do” in questions of the type “who knows?”
added 18 characters in body
Jun
11
awarded  Deputy
Jun
10
comment Why is “our today's meeting” wrong?
@JanusBahsJacquet: But, if it is definiteness, instead of genitiveness, then what about the last word, the only time? Those sound quite definite, even if they aren't. I agree with your and Oerkelens' explanation in general, but I have a feeling it is either more complicated or more arbitrary. P.S. These our last words is even possible in older/archaic English. bartleby.com/224/10000.html Perhaps the only difference is that we would now consider that appositive and punctuate it so...<musing> just as King John is an unpunctuated appositive, in a way, my brother Orthus.
Jun
10
answered I need to know how to phrase part of a sentence containing the word of
Jun
10
answered Can I have multiple question marks in one sentence?
Jun
9
reviewed Reject How do I identify a British idiom from an American one?
Jun
9
comment Past Perfect Confusion
In the last example, you use a simple past to describe something that took place over a continuous period (was...for nearly a decade) and was still going on by the time the "main" event happened (was awarded). Normally, you can't use a simple past for this. In your first example, there is less of a notion of a continuous period up to the main event. That is my preliminary explanation of the apparent discrepancy.
Jun
9
answered Dangling participles and more
Jun
9
comment Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles
That rule may be valid, but in your example there is no modifier or argument after driving: the comma ends the clause, and what follows does not modify driving at all. // Keep in mind that this rule is not hard and fast; that's why it says "usually", as you quoted.
Jun
9
comment Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles
I think I am still missing your point, because I don't even understand your comment completely. Why introduce a full clause, and why add an object? To me, I was driving slowly sounds fine, while I was slowly driving changes the meaning in an odd way; based on your answer, I would expect you to disagree, but I don't know what your opinion on the OP's examples is exactly.
Jun
7
comment Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles
Now I'm not sure any more. In a specific context, you could probably make any of those examples work, but... Slowly driving I could see a beautiful landscape sounds odd in the most obvious context. Driving slowly I... is fine. // After watch I would use an infinitive rather than a participle, but I'm not sure I would call the participle wrong. Either position of the adverb works for me with rise.
Jun
7
comment Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles
The verb drive behaves differently when you add an object (my car): that's why your examples are indeed unidiomatic, but they are different from the OP's. At any rate, you'd have to prove that a participial construction's grammaticality can be tested by means of a full clause (I doubt it).
Jun
7
revised Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles
added 32 characters in body
Jun
5
comment Are androphilic males persons with a homosexual erotic development?
@JanusBahsJacquet: That is a fair point. But, if I may refine it further, and if we assume that sexuality is in a continuum between pure homosexuality and pure heterosexuality, hardly anyone will be 100% homosexual, but we use the word for those who firmly, or even mainly, swing to that side of the scale. And so they need not be 100% unattracted to women or children or monkeys.