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12h
comment What figure of speech is this, “assaulted by a haircut”?
At least it is some kind of metaphor, because the assaulting is not an actual assault. Welcome to this site!
13h
comment Can unthinking entities be “informed” in the sense of “being provided with information”?
Inform with, I have never seen that, but I suppose it makes sense!
16h
comment Which terms are used to describe language usage?
This question may be of interest: What's the difference between “informal”, “colloquial”, “slang”, and “vulgar”?
18h
comment Can somebody tell me wheres should I put commas and semicolons in the following statement
Welcome to the site! I recommend a list with bullet points, each phrase on a new line.
1d
comment A Pyrrhic defeat?
The finishing blow? A decisive battle? The turning point?
1d
comment Position of “here” in a sentence
A has to be transformed to B, which is done by a rotation R here. (correct) — A has to be transformed to B, which *here is done by a rotation R . (sounds odd) — A has to be transformed to B, which is here done by a rotation R. (probably possible) — A has to be transformed to B, which is done here by a rotation R. (possible)
2d
revised Clauses in Sentences
added 884 characters in body
2d
answered Clauses in Sentences
2d
revised Change of form of some (Latin) prefixes like ex-, ad- into ef-, a-: are there rules or conditions?
added 6 characters in body
2d
comment Analyzing 'as' in ascertain, assure, etc
It is called prefixion or prefigation. See also: Change of form of some (Latin) prefixes like ex-, ad- into ef-, a-: are there rules or conditions?
2d
comment How does “to consist in” mean “to have as an essential feature”?
@LawArea51Proposal-Commit: My point was that the word already had this meaning in classical Latin, which makes its post-classical history irrelevant. It literally means "stand together in x".
Apr
16
comment Number disagreement between subject and verb in Shakespeare?
From Wikipaedia: A present subjunctive verb form is sometimes found in a main clause, with the force of a wish or a third person imperative (and such forms can alternatively be analyzed as imperatives). This is most common nowadays in established phrases, such as (God) bless you, God save the Queen, heaven forbid, peace be with you, truth be told, so be it, suffice it to say, long live..., woe betide... It can be found used more broadly in some archaic English. — So in your example it means "let [that which may come] come", let come being my paraphrase of the subjunctive come.
Apr
16
comment Number disagreement between subject and verb in Shakespeare?
Ad 1. The first come is a subjunctive, and subjunctives have different endings (in this case, a subjunctive of the 3rd person singular has no -s).
Apr
15
comment Is Grammar An Exact Science?
+1 Good answer. But I would stress that terminology is probably far less consensual and defined than in meteorology: ask three linguists to define what a preposition is, and you will get four answers. One could argue that linguistics is more akin to the social sciences. Secondly, linguistics depends on the interpretation of language; it also requires skills and methods similar to those of the humanities, especially in some sub-fields. You often cannot properly analyse literature linguistically without understanding its complete and deeper meaning (cultural references, even in speech.)
Apr
15
revised Commas, prepositions and subordinating conjunctions
edited body
Apr
15
comment Commas, prepositions and subordinating conjunctions
@JohnyDiala: There you go. Let me know if something else needs to be clarified. And welcome to this website!
Apr
15
revised Commas, prepositions and subordinating conjunctions
added 1675 characters in body
Apr
15
answered Commas, prepositions and subordinating conjunctions
Apr
13
answered What is the grammatical designation of “that” in “…that she may have…”?
Apr
13
awarded  Notable Question