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1d
revised Can the verb number be unknown in an interrogative sentence where the subject is unknown?
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answered Can the verb number be unknown in an interrogative sentence where the subject is unknown?
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awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
25
comment Is this kind of conditional sentence grammatically correct?
@TimLymington: I think this is rather basic formal logic, and neither of us is stupid; therefore, one of us must have been staring at this for too long, semantic satiation...
Jul
24
comment Is this kind of conditional sentence grammatically correct?
@TimLymington: I disagree. The only valid conclusion in formal logic is: it isn't raining; therefore there is no puddle (if we leave out the whole subjunctive thing). Do you disagree with my statement above?: Drawing a conclusion from a material implication is possible if and only if the antecedent is true (then the conclusion is that the consequent must be true). The OP was drawing a conclusion from the consequent, which is invalid. I did the same (invalid) thing in my example, as intended.
Jul
24
comment Is this kind of conditional sentence grammatically correct?
@TimLymington: Drawing a conclusion from a material implication is possible if and only if the antecedent is true (then the conclusion is that the consequent must be true). The OP was drawing a conclusion from the consequent, which is invalid. I did the same (invalid) thing in my example, as intended. So I don't see any problems...
Jul
19
revised Is this kind of conditional sentence grammatically correct?
added 93 characters in body
Jul
19
revised Is this kind of conditional sentence grammatically correct?
added 3 characters in body
Jul
19
answered Is this kind of conditional sentence grammatically correct?
Jul
17
comment bare infinitive
@JanusBahsJacquet: Thank you. Your judgement as a linguist means a lot to me.
Jul
17
comment bare infinitive
@StoneyB: I'm not quite sure we analyses the issue so very differently!
Jul
16
comment “He didn't know where New Jersey was”
@iamRR: I don't encounter this a lot in major newspapers, but I cannot exclude that it should happen. However, as I said, the whole snippet you quoted is of a low quality, as evidenced by the missing article before particular college. I would not say it is not acceptable anywhere, except in a very informal context. A newspaper is usually not that place. At any rate, major newspapers are not paragons of proper style; they just hire people like you and me. Better look at literature or style books.
Jul
15
comment Is there a word for the form of a word that means “pertaining to”?
Welcome to the site! I don't know the answer (yet), but I do know that the suffix is -onym, not *-nym, from Greek onoma/onuma "name, noun".
Jul
14
comment etymology of predation and predating?
@Code: It is true that the Ancients, like the Humanists in some ways, entertained a cyclical view of history; but that was only one of several views that vied for dominance, depending on the genre, the period, etc. While both words ultimately contain the same prae-, the -dat- is entirely different in each word: they come from entirely unrelated roots (Proto-Indo-European ~*dʰe- in predating and *gʰ-n(e)-d- in predation). It is possible that prae- in praeda primed some connotation of anteriority to a Roman, but I have to say I doubt whether it was significant in context.
Jul
14
comment “He didn't know where New Jersey was”
@iamRR: I do think that should be wanted. The snippet is obviously written in a very informal style, but it is also sloppy; consider this: I did not dream about joining [a] particular college. I would not consider want acceptable in your snippet, but one sees all kinds of minor slip-ups in newspapers, especially in informal pieces like this.
Jul
14
comment “He didn't know where New Jersey was”
@iamRR: Ah, well, newspapers are in some ways often non-standard in their language. Headlines often don't stick to normal grammar. Or the historic present can be used, etc. We'd need to see an example.
Jul
14
comment etymology of predation and predating?
Actually, praeda comes from prae-hend-o (fun fact: -hend- is related to -gin in begin), so both words contain the prefix prae-.
Jul
14
comment Is there a rule for the correct pronunciation of words starting with “ex”?
@sumelic: At your service!
Jul
14
revised Is there a rule for the correct pronunciation of words starting with “ex”?
added 42 characters in body
Jul
11
answered bare infinitive