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May
1
comment How to correctly apply “in which”, “of which”, “at which”, “to which”, etc?
Welcome to the site! Could you be more specific and perhaps give some examples of sentences that you're not sure about?
Apr
30
comment Figures of Speech: Inversion, doubt
@BillJ: You're really focusing on specific terminology...that's fine, but you might not want to state terminology as an absolute fact, because it's just terminology. Different people use different terms in different ways, and that is not counterfactual. If they have good reasons for doing so... Don't fall for the 19th-century classification trap! Latinists used to make long lists of the different ways the ablative could be used, each with a different term.
Apr
30
comment Figures of Speech: Inversion, doubt
@medica: It does change the meaning, but perhaps it is possible that we have been in every house—for example, if the context dictates that this is only about every house in a certain street, or if it is a deliberate exaggeration, or whatever. But perhaps that doesn't fit the actual context, which I haven't seen?
Apr
30
revised Figures of Speech: Inversion, doubt
added 28 characters in body
Apr
30
answered Figures of Speech: Inversion, doubt
Apr
30
comment Word that Resembles The Dutch Word Kudde
Hi! Two questions: 1. why not use herd? Why do you need a different word? 2. Why do you write couth? What do you mean by that?
Apr
30
comment Why should the first person pronoun 'I' always be capitalized?
@what: I am aware of the use of the ı in Turkish and ɪ in IPA. But why shouldn't I use the character when describing the shape of a mediaeval letter if it suits the purpose? What would you propose that I should use instead?
Apr
29
comment “It was the kind of story that / where you had to be there.” — Are the relative words 'where' and 'that' interchangeable?
This is an excellent answer! Perhaps there are other words like place, but not many. By the way, the place that... (in the construction mentioned) is casual or informal.
Apr
28
comment Two relative clauses together before the main verb
@Pell: 1. Okay, so a which clause can refer back to a whole clause, but then why can't a participle do the same? I'm still considering all options and I haven't decided yet which analysis I find the most useful; so far the three options are: a) it refers to the whole clause; b) it refers to an implicit noun; c) it is adverbial. 2. I have asked a few people in different chat rooms, and none saw a problem in my cat sentence, at least not with resulting. I'm not 100% sure what my own opinion is, but I am convinced that the kind of construction I used can in fact be found in natural language.
Apr
28
comment Two relative clauses together before the main verb
@PellMel: 1. So is it possible for you, then, that a relative clause refers back to nothing specific? 2. How about if I add a dash: I saw the shape of her cat underneath the blankets—a big cat, resulting in a big lump.
Apr
28
comment Two relative clauses together before the main verb
@FumbleFingers: I suppose that is possible: but then what does which refer back to? It would still have to refer back to something, as it is a relative. Cf. I experienced love for the first time, which emotion is the most powerful of all. Here it refers back to love. I would say in your example you'd still have to say which action refers back to the whole previous clause, or to some implicit noun.
Apr
28
comment Two relative clauses together before the main verb
@PellMel: You could say that resulting is an adverb there. However, then what would the semantically similar which clause be (see my "quotation")? Would you say a which clause can be used adverbially? I'd rather not analyse it like that, I think. I'd rather assume an implicit noun and analyse the participle or which clause as modifying this noun. Consider also this example: I saw the shape of her cat underneath the blankets, a big cat, resulting in a big lump. Would you say resulting... is used adverbially here, too? If so, what verb does it modify exactly?
Apr
28
answered Two relative clauses together before the main verb
Apr
25
reviewed Reviewed What does “reclusion” mean specifically?
Apr
25
reviewed No Action Needed Word for the result of shining a laser at something
Apr
25
reviewed No Action Needed How should I punctuate this sentence?
Apr
25
awarded  Custodian
Apr
25
reviewed No Action Needed Shortening of the phrase “Six weeks”?
Apr
25
reviewed No Action Needed Am I RICEing my injury?
Apr
25
reviewed No Action Needed What do you call a student who studies extra at home to become proficient?