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seen Jul 26 '13 at 22:26

Apr
3
comment What is the difference between an Emperor and a King?
+1 for the diagram. Any others like it?
Feb
26
comment Is “Trees are the right height” an established phrase? What does it mean?
"Smog" or "smug"? :)
Jan
25
comment How did southern US blacks address whites post-emancipation and pre-civil rights?
I thought buckaroo was from Spanish vaquero?
Jan
3
comment Why do people pronounce “Naomi” as “Niomi”?
@MonicaCellio: "nah-oh-MEE," technically (the accent is on the last syllable Biblically, and I think also in modern Hebrew).
Dec
18
comment Are heteronyms unique to English and why do they exist?
If you also consider also languages that are usually written with abjads (consonantal alphabets), such as Hebrew and Arabic, then you have lots of heteronyms. In Hebrew, for example, the letters בקר can be read as boker ("morning"), bakar ("cattle"), biker ("visited," 3rd person masc. sing.), etc.
Dec
12
comment Is there a term for words that have a single meaning or are only used in a single context?
@TimLymington: yeah, the author of that page mentions that "there is such a thing as a petrel which isn't stormy, but the term was a catchy one so it stuck."
Nov
16
comment “Me and my wife” or “my wife and me”
@DavidSchwartz, "who loves me" in your example is a subclause, not the subject of the sentence. (The subject is "the woman.") Whereas in "my wife and I," those four words together are the subject.
Nov
15
comment “Me and my wife” or “my wife and me”
@DavidSchwartz: but then you'd have no way to write the sentence at all. ("Me are pleased" wouldn't be any better.) The point is that this position in the sentence requires a subject ("I") rather than an object ("me").
May
29
comment Is it common to use the borrowed noun-adjective form for borrowed French phrases?
Your third item should really be court martial - i.e., a military court.
May
29
comment Origin of “hating on”
Maybe it's an intensification of the older phrase ragging on (someone)?
Apr
21
comment Why is “Good Friday” called “good”, instead of sad or bad?
Plus, @Rauf, it is most certainly not something-or-other "to the human kind." It is a special day - be it good, sad, bad, or whatever - to the adherents of a particular religion to which some of humankind subscribes.
Apr
18
comment A word that sounds like “scoshe” meaning “small amount” or “smidgen”
As does the Straight Dope.
Mar
31
comment How do I perform presidential proper noun declension?
@PLL: Reaganite means "someone associated with Reagan"; Reaganesque means "acting like Reagan." So arguably, you might indeed use "Reaganian" to describe his doctrine or whatever, although I think The Raven is correct in his last paragraph that you'd usually just hear the name itself used as an adjective in that case ("the Reagan doctrine").
Mar
31
comment How do I perform presidential proper noun declension?
@Raven: why would the adjectival form for Taft use his middle name? Shouldn't it be "Taftian"?
Mar
25
comment Derivation of “anus” from “annulus”?
@Pete: Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Changes_to_Old_English_vocabulary) lists the following obsolete English words for it: earsgang, setl, and ūtgang.
Mar
16
comment Use of 'pagan' in an essay: is it acceptable or not?
If it's just that you need another term for variation, how about "Hellenic (or Hellenistic) gods"?
Mar
14
comment Why is “I” capitalized in the English language, but not “me” or “you”?
Apparent duplicate of english.stackexchange.com/questions/7986/… and english.stackexchange.com/questions/13871/….
Mar
8
comment Using the definite article before a country/state name
@Colin: I think that with some of your examples in the first paragraph, they were indeed originally thought of as descriptive. Ukraine means something like "borderlands"; Punjab means "five rivers"; Gambia is the name of the river that bisects the country, and those often get a definite article (the Mississippi, for example); and Argentine means "silver-bearing area."
Mar
8
comment Example of sentence using “sang-froid”
Not going to put this as an answer because it'll be downvoted, but here's another one: " Psychological problems keeping you from being calm? / Blame 'em on your unresolved issues with Mom, sang Freud."
Mar
8
comment Is “whatsoever” a formal word in written English?
Somewhat off-topic, perhaps, but in all of these examples, wouldn't of be better than about?