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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Jul 26 '13 at 22:26

Jan
16
comment J.A. Gagarin's flight vs J.A. Gagarin flight
@psmears: I thought of that, but I still don't know that I'd agree. It seems more natural to me to say, for example, "Lindbergh's flight led to his being lionized, while Earhart's flight resulted in her fate becoming an enduring mystery."
Jan
16
answered Is there a name for inverting word order to accomplish a different meaning?
Jan
14
answered J.A. Gagarin's flight vs J.A. Gagarin flight
Jan
12
answered Can snow be dry?
Jan
6
answered Omitted words in a comparison
Jan
5
awarded  Scholar
Jan
5
accepted “A million and a half” vs. “one and a half million”
Jan
5
comment “A million and a half” vs. “one and a half million”
The difference is that with the time units, "X and a half" doesn't sound as odd because they are indeed perceived as a single unit - not as 60 minutes, or 30 days, or whatever. Whereas with "a million" (or "a dozen," for that matter) you perceive the discrete units, and then appending "a half" to those could be ambiguous.
Jan
5
awarded  Student
Jan
5
asked “A million and a half” vs. “one and a half million”
Jan
5
comment Why should the first person pronoun 'I' always be capitalized?
But then, why is vocative "O" usually capitalized too?
Jan
4
answered Use of “e.g.” — are parentheses necessary?
Jan
2
comment Why do common swear words have four letters?
Fair enough about some of them - that we use a digraph for sh, for example, is an accident of history (because Latin lacked such a sound), for example. But weren't some of these originally indeed pronounced more-or-less as written? "Damn" certainly was - the n was assimilated and dropped out from the pronunciation - and I was under the impression that "hell" was once pronounced with geminated l. Not sure about whether the same was true of ck.
Jan
2
answered adding a prefix “re” to a word, with or without a hyphen?
Jan
2
comment Why does Germany's English name differ from its German name?
Improper nouns, sure. But proper names are usually fairly stable. If you went to Germany, would you expect them to translate "Rob" into their native language, and call you "Rauben"? :)
Jan
2
answered Why do common swear words have four letters?
Jan
2
answered Term for people in artistic formation
Jan
2
comment “Till death do us part”
@nohat, why would you expect it to be we? It's the object of "part", with "death" as the subject of that verb. In modern English, the phrase would be rendered something like "until death parts us," not "until we part at death."
Jan
2
awarded  Critic
Dec
29
answered How are diminutives formed in recent English words?