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location Brooklyn, NY
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visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Jul 26 '13 at 22:26

Mar
4
answered Word for 'so simple you'd think it's obvious but it's not'
Mar
2
answered Speaking for the sake of saying something
Feb
26
comment Is “Trees are the right height” an established phrase? What does it mean?
"Smog" or "smug"? :)
Feb
26
answered What does “higgledy-piggledy” mean?
Feb
24
answered Is there a simpler, more poetic term for “the detritus of animal life”?
Feb
13
answered Etymology of “trumpet” and “triumphant”
Jan
31
answered French speaker here — How to pronounce “r” and “l”?
Jan
25
comment How did southern US blacks address whites post-emancipation and pre-civil rights?
I thought buckaroo was from Spanish vaquero?
Jan
25
answered Origin of “s**t one's pants”
Jan
3
comment Why do people pronounce “Naomi” as “Niomi”?
@MonicaCellio: "nah-oh-MEE," technically (the accent is on the last syllable Biblically, and I think also in modern Hebrew).
Dec
21
awarded  Yearling
Dec
18
comment Are heteronyms unique to English and why do they exist?
If you also consider also languages that are usually written with abjads (consonantal alphabets), such as Hebrew and Arabic, then you have lots of heteronyms. In Hebrew, for example, the letters בקר can be read as boker ("morning"), bakar ("cattle"), biker ("visited," 3rd person masc. sing.), etc.
Dec
15
answered Proper term for people from eastern Asia
Dec
12
comment Is there a term for words that have a single meaning or are only used in a single context?
@TimLymington: yeah, the author of that page mentions that "there is such a thing as a petrel which isn't stormy, but the term was a catchy one so it stuck."
Dec
6
answered Synonyms for “Needs some attention” and “getting attention”?
Nov
17
answered How do I quote nonconsecutive lines from a poem?
Nov
16
comment “Me and my wife” or “my wife and me”
@DavidSchwartz, "who loves me" in your example is a subclause, not the subject of the sentence. (The subject is "the woman.") Whereas in "my wife and I," those four words together are the subject.
Nov
15
comment “Me and my wife” or “my wife and me”
@DavidSchwartz: but then you'd have no way to write the sentence at all. ("Me are pleased" wouldn't be any better.) The point is that this position in the sentence requires a subject ("I") rather than an object ("me").
Jun
30
answered Is there a word for two persons dodging each other on the street?
Jun
3
answered When is it appropriate to use non-breaking spaces?