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Web designer. Instrument player. Book reader.

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2h
comment Can anyone give me a word to describe the fear one faces when he/she is about to ask his boss for a vacation/raise?
No, there is no such word. Obviously. Cf. also Word for disrespecting eldest half-sister by referring to her husband as girly-girl-manly-boy though he's amused but the rest of the family isn't?
12h
revised Is it grammatical to finish a sentence with “also”?
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12h
revised You are in Jonathan’s circles: “too” or “as well” or “also”?
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12h
revised When can I use “as well” as a synonym for “too” or “also”?
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12h
revised Difference between: Also, too and as well
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12h
revised The correct usage of “too” and “also”
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12h
revised Can I end this sentence with “also” or “too”? Which one is right?
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15h
comment Single word for making a bow
... at the same time, the German way of spelling compounds gets you words that are long and succinct at the same time, and English very much recognizes that by borrowing (kindergarten, wunderkind, doppelganger, wanderlust, zeitgeist, schadenfreude...). Just the other day I posted this Spiegel article in our chat, featuring the lovely word Skandalbürgermeister, and guess what — it immediately got appreciation from English speakers. How could it not.
15h
answered Single word for making a bow
21h
comment sentences that show correct pronoun agreement
Yes, it is correct. But it probably does not mean what you want it to mean.
22h
comment Where do the apostrophes go?
Client = one client. Clients = several clients. Client's = of one client. Clients' = of several clients. Just like with pretty much every word ever. Including kid.
22h
comment Punctuation in English Speaking Countries
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
23h
comment Some of them are requested to vs some of them have requested
@tevin you might be interested in our sister site for learners of the language. On this site here, participants are expected to have sufficient command of the language to tell the difference between requesting and being requested.
23h
comment Some of them are requested to vs some of them have requested
Given that the OP can't tell which one to use even with all the context that he has, it is extremely dangerous to guess which one he should use without any context whatsoever.
1d
comment Adverb for 'within a short timeframe'
I have removed the side question, as it is both unrelated to the question at hand and has been asked and answered before.
1d
revised Adverb for 'within a short timeframe'
deleted 182 characters in body
1d
answered A question regarding a parallel
1d
comment When did “ain't” become slang?
Slang is “very informal usage in vocabulary and idiom that is characteristically more metaphorical, playful, elliptical, vivid, and ephemeral than ordinary language”. Ain't is the exact opposite of that, on all accounts. It is as ordinary, ubiquitous, unmetaphorical and universally understood as you could possibly get. You might as well ask when "the" became slang.
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
reviewed No Action Needed Meaning of “to be responsible for being…”