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seen 10 hours ago

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10h
comment Computing: 32 bit or 32 bits?
This question is actually not clear at all. (And the linked original even less so.) What do you mean "should we say"? What is the exact context? What is the sentence you want to use it in? The answer depends on what part of speech we are talking about. As a modifier, it is "32-bit". Never "32-bits". As a noun, it is exactly the other way round. The reason and logic behind this being that this is exactly how all other nouns and modifiers behave in English.
13h
comment “See you later” in chat
Also, since you've misspelled the word not once but twice, it's "tongue", with an O. And you can't be a tongue, so "I'm not English mother tongue" makes no sense. You mean to say "English is not my mother tongue", or "I am not a native speaker". Lastly, if you plan to be back really soon, you'll say "be back later" or "BBL" for short. And you totally should use the typical abbreviations everyone else uses. If your interlocutor does not understand them, he can look them up, or simply ask you. Just like with any other word. After all, millions of people don't know the word "you", either.
13h
comment “See you later” in chat
This question is off-topic as general reference. You might wish to consider our sister site for learners in the future. "See you later" is used in chat so incredibly often that we'd have to wonder if you've ever been to a chat. By the way, Stack Exchange has a chat, and you can even search the transcript to get the answer to your question.
16h
answered Word for “opening and closing the mouth?”
1d
comment Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”
In order to be grammatically acceptable, "a contraction like this is used" is perfectly sufficient. Grammar is not about inconvenience, convenience is not ungrammatical, and a sentence does not have to make any sense at all to be grammatically correct. Also, perfect is an aspect, not a tense.
1d
answered Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”
1d
comment Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”
In addition to what tchrist says, "have occurred" is present perfect, not past perfect. Past perfect would be "had occurred".
1d
revised Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”
added 60 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
1d
comment Is “A pair of two” redundant?
Please provide an example or five, why you (do not) think they are redundant, why you (do not) think it matters, and what rewordings you are considering, if any. Failing that, this question is rhetorical.
1d
comment A word for something being measured
You will need to provide further context, as the quoted sentence fragment does not really make sense on its own. A square meter does not measure the same thing as a meter. It might well be that you will have to rewrite from scratch, in which case the missing word is a red herring.
2d
revised Can “tamper” be used transitively?
deleted 10 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
2d
comment Can I say “thousands of <something>” to make it sound more dramatic when it's actually “a thousand and a half”?
There is a very much on-topic question somewhere in here, but clearly not in the current wording. You can say anything you want. And by the way: if you wanted to make it sound more impressive, you should say you are making billions a day. Thousands a month is not impressive at all. I am being paid a trillion just for copy-pasting this comment from my ghostwriter, who actually gets paid thousands of dollars a month, and you are the first person I learn of that earns less than him.
2d
comment after reading the subject
"After reading the subject" is pretty much the only grammatical thing in this entire post. Making this just a proofreading request, and we don't do proofreading here.
2d
comment “Shamefully presents” vs. “ashamedly presents”
From the standpoint of grammar, pretty much any adverb in that position is equally correct. The question is entirely about meaning and has nothing whatsoever to do with grammar.
2d
revised “Shamefully presents” vs. “ashamedly presents”
deleted 14 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
2d
comment Can “definitely” be used as a conjunction?
You will need to flesh this out quite a bit. Please add an example sentence or five where you think "definitely" works as a conjunction, and why you think so. If you cannot add a single example sentence, please add a reference that suggests it's possible. If you can provide neither, then specify what the point of this question is, then. Why do you want to use "definitely" as a conjunction? In what context, to what end, and in what meaning? Then the question can be reopened. Failing that, we'd be inviting "can mother/enormous/hello/swimming be a conjunction?" and other lazy one-liners.
2d
revised Can “definitely” be used as a conjunction?
edited title
Nov
24
comment Why are there so many synonyms in English?
First off, every language, including your own, has tons of obscure words like elucidate that nobody ever uses. Second off, perhaps the original does actually say "elucidated", then translating it as "explained" would be wrong. But we don't know what the original says, so we can't tell you which word to use in the translation. Third off, this is Translation 101. These are the absolute basics every translator knows.
Nov
22
comment Why is the apostrophe spelling of 'Doh!' so common?
The apostrophe is in there for the exact same reason the h is in there: because no reason. We have to spell the word somehow. So you spell it "doh", I spell it "d'oh", and someone else spells it "d;eaux", and then some spellings catch on and others don't. And that's all there's to it. Any other explanation — every other explanation — is justification in hindsight. Smoke and mirrors. And coincidentally, that is how the spelling of every single word of every single language in every single writing system gets figured out. So there is really nothing at all peculiar about this particular word.
Nov
21
comment has rather than a/has?
Of course I can own a yacht rather than ten cars. There is nothing about the English language, or any language for that matter, that would force me to own two yachts if I don't own ten cars.