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1d
comment “were among the earliest” or “are among the earliest”?
@Dan Actually, if the entire surrounding text is set in historical present, then so would have this sentence. Without context, this question makes about as much sense as asking whether it should be "I have a dog" or "I have a cat". Well, what do you have?
1d
comment Can you use “perhaps” at the beginning of a sentence and omit the verb?
Please specify your reason for thinking it is not normal. (If you do not have a reason, then you don't have a question.)
1d
comment How to use “To give you a brief overview” in the beginning of a sentence?
Congratulations, you have successfully used "to give you a brief overview" in the beginning of a sentence. The only problem left is what follows that beginning. You promise to give an overview of your interest (which does not make sense), but then immediately forget about your promise and instead give us a list of knowledges (which is not even English). So far the only words in that sentence you should not worry about are "to give you a brief overview".
2d
comment Street intersection name
Since you have not specified a city or any cardinal directions, the most accurate answer we can give is "you can call it whatever you want for as long as it's clear what you mean".
2d
reviewed Leave Closed Modal Verbs: HELP
2d
comment Modal Verbs: HELP
They wrote "should" in the beginning of the sentence for the exact same reason they wrote "help" in the middle, and "tomorrow" at the end. They wrote "should" in the beginning of the sentence for the exact same reason you used "I" in the beginning of yours. These are the words that express what the author wanted to express.
2d
comment Grammar Punctuation Proofreading
Yes, there are. Good thing you asked.
2d
comment Modal Verbs: HELP
You forgot to ask a question. You didn't forget to YELL FOR HELP, but you did forget to ask a question. So, what is your question? This is a question-and-answer site. If you don't have a question, we cannot help you.
Aug
25
revised Converting sentences to different forms
added 6 characters in body; edited tags
Aug
25
comment Converting sentences to different forms
Additionally, the instructions are not even clear. 1. Change what into plural? 2. What is "future progressive"? And so on. Please do watch your spelling and punctuation, too. There is no such thing as "recives" or "grammer". And where have you seen a whitespace go before a period? Where have you seen people punctuate parentheses like you do? Nowhere. Nobody does that. Nobody anywhere. So please don't do that, either. It is horribly wrong.
Aug
25
comment Converting sentences to different forms
Whether or not this is homework (not "homeworks"), is irrelevant to the fact that you, just like everyone else, must first make a good-faith attempt to solve the problem yourself and then ask about specific problems with your existing approach to answering the question. Otherwise we will give you one fish — or five, in this case —, but you'll still not have the slightest idea how fishing works.
Aug
25
comment Please explain the conclusion of this quote
There is no explanation, which makes it a highly controversial strategy. The conclusion cannot be explained, which makes it a highly controversial strategy. It plain makes no sense at all, which makes it a highly controversial strategy. It just tacks on some words that mean nothing, which makes it a highly nonsensical rubbish nonsense rubbish.
Aug
25
comment x in press Or Press releases about x
Hello. All three mean different things, none means what you want, and one is not even English. You might be interested in our sister site for learners of the language. Alternatively, you can take the question to our chat once you have 20 reputation points.
Aug
25
revised Hypernym for “driver” and “passenger”
deleted 5 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Aug
25
revised “I never was” vs. “I was never”
added 62 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Aug
25
comment “For your archive”
There are other problems with the sentence. It is immediately apparent it was not produced by a native speaker. Consequently, it makes no difference whatsoever whether it says "for your archive" or not. It won't be an English sentence either way.
Aug
25
revised “For your archive”
deleted 37 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Aug
25
comment The pronunciation rules of words which begin 'Com-, Col-, Cor-' or 'Con-'
Written words are not pronounced. Spoken words are written down. And the spelling encodes many different things, of which a poor approximation of the pronunciation is just one. Consequently, there is absolutely no reliable way to figure out the pronunciation of a word by looking at its spelling. In every language, not just English. In short, this question is unanswerable at best, and nonsensical at worst.
Aug
24
comment What is the simplest way to prepare the IELTS?
To prepare the IELTS, first break some eggs, then add bacon. To get the highest band, add more bacon and some grass. Use the bacon to lure in a drummer and a bass player, then use the grass to get them as highest as humanly possible.
Aug
24
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