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8h
reviewed Approve Number of verbs possible in a single sentence
Jan
26
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
25
revised “My father's hands” vs. “the hands of my father”
deleted 4 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Jan
25
comment Is “might could” a correct construct?
@sebhofer: well yes, perhaps that particular example was just a bit over the top to drive home a point. Comments are like that, quick and dirty. I didn't feel like spending too much time coming up with a better example. That said, modal stacking of length three is certainly quite common, in daily conversation and on the evening news alike. (In fact, in daily conversation it's way more common than "ich buk" or "ich flöge", yet you wouldn't claim that German has no Präteritum or Konjunktiv.)
Jan
22
comment … for the reaction to, and prevention of, waste, loss and theft. (Commas correct?)
Those are not dashes. That being said, both parts of the question are duplicates.
Jan
22
comment What is a synonym for geo (Geolocation )?
Certainly if not many people are familiar with a term, then the solution is to make them familiar with it. Use it more often, not less. If you use a different term instead, you will only worsen the problem yourself.
Jan
22
comment Can you further categorise 'Modern English'?
If I suck at Modern English, it's still Modern English I suck at. Just like if I suck at driving a BMW with style, it doesn't suddenly transform into a Zaporozhets.
Jan
22
comment Verb meaning “enters/affects/holds relevance within each part of my life”
The sentence is ungrammatical (amazing at), unidiomatic (sectors of my life), and the register is all over the place (amazing vs philosophy), so the choice of that one word is the least of you problems. Whichever word you pick, it will be a very, very poor sentence. The answerers do recognize that and suggest rewordings, but that amounts to proofreading and is off-topic as such.
Jan
22
comment A word(s) for an account that is dependant on another account?
Child account is fine. Sub-account can be fine. And nothing is wrong with saying dependant, either. It is rather unusual to have not one but three options at your disposal and still be on the lookout for a fourth.
Jan
21
comment Is the sentence “what he did was climb a tree” grammatical?
Both "what he did was climb" and "what he did was to climb" are perfectly grammatical, though the former is preferred over the latter. See “All you have to do is read” vs. “All you have to do is to read” and the related questions linked from there.
Jan
21
comment Is there a RULE (not opinion) for when it's okay to replace “is” with “'s”?
[... continued] The only exception to this is outlined here, but again has nothing to do with the word and everything with its position in the sentence. So "God's wiser than me" works, and "I'm wiser than God's" doesn't — but that has nothing whatsoever to do with whether or not people would be offended by my calling God a moron, and everything with the fact that you can't say "God's wiser than I'm", either, but it has to be "God's wiser than I am" instead.
Jan
21
comment Is there a RULE (not opinion) for when it's okay to replace “is” with “'s”?
I don't know why we bring religion into this. Unless that person himself expressly brought it up (in which case this is not even a question about English anymore), it's useless speculation that only confuses the matters further. We must answer the question at face value. And the answer is, of course, any word at all can be contracted. He's, cat's, God's, Obama's, Putin's, Buddha's, all's. There is no such thing as a "non-established contraction", and indeed every single "established" contraction started life as non-established. Ten years ago Obama's didn't exist, either. [continued...]
Jan
19
revised Is it “she is a friend of Jennifer” or "of Jennifer's?
added 12 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Jan
19
revised “A law decreased what schools had been permitted” vs. “are permitted”
deleted 38 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Jan
19
comment Please find a word that it is not grammatically correct to begin a sentence or question?
I find "Aplenty were the treats" unobjectionable. Quite poetic, in fact. It's just a hyperbaton, is all. Can't say the same about "Galore there was whisky". Really two different leagues.
Jan
19
comment Word for letters from a foreign or unknown language
"It's Greek to me" is an idiom. It doesn't mean you're actually saying it is Greek. It could be Chinese or Russian or Urdu. Or even incomprehensible English, for that matter.
Jan
19
revised “She is at the dentist's now”
deleted 17 characters in body; edited tags
Jan
19
comment Writing e-mail to a supplier
Ask it in your mother tongue, then simply take a dictionary of your choice and translate it.
Jan
19
comment “He is the only one who can see the door to my soul” came across this in marriage invitation, I can't understand it, help please
If translating does not help, then this question has nothing to do with English and is thus off-topic.