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1h
comment Word for numeric value that is not necessarily the result of a measuring process
What is a "mechanical properties measurement"? What properties? What are you (not) measuring? The answer may and probably will greatly depend on that. Is it density, frequency, elasticity, inertia, angle of attack, plasticity, something else entirely, some of them, all of them, none of them? It is not clear at all what you are asking. If you can't find a good word with all the context that you do have, how are we expected to find it without any context whatsoever? Also, what alternatives exactly have you considered and rejected so far? We need to know that so as not to repost them.
1h
revised Word for numeric value that is not necessarily the result of a measuring process
deleted 217 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
2h
comment When writing a question?
Please define "proper". The shortest? The longest? The one using the most capitals? The one using the fewest vowels? The one I personally like? The one most used by Charlotte Brontë? Something else?
2h
comment Worth of or worth?
Both are equally grammatical, but the second one makes zero sense. "Worth" means "costing". "Worth of" means "deserving to receive". A book can cost $6, but a book cannot receive $6. So it can be worth money, but cannot be worth of money. It could be worth of things such as praise, say. Because it can receive praise. Differences in meaning like these can be looked up in a dictionary. Which dictionaries have you looked them up in?
4h
comment Are the following rules correct? Why?
Since this question has nothing to do with English, it is off-topic here.
5h
comment is this sentence right?
Yes, due to can start a sentence. And it plays the exact same role in this sentence as it does in any other. You can look up the meaning in a dictionary of your choice. Which is also much faster than typing up an entire question here.
5h
comment “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” is:
Please see our guidelines for asking homework questions. Specifically, "make a good-faith attempt to solve the problem yourself first" and "ask about specific problems with your existing approach to answering the question". Have you looked up fact? Do you know what opinion means? Did you consult a dictionary on the meaning of suggestion? If so, what do you think is the answer? Why do you think so? What is the specific problem you are facing telling facts from advice?
23h
revised Hypernym for “audio podcast”, “radio drama”, and “audiobook”
added 2 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
1d
comment what is the deference between 'inter-city' and 'intercity'
Please cite an example or ten. Seeing how you always note that, it should be trivial to do that. Failing that, the question is half unanswerable, half rhetorical.
1d
comment The first two of ten thousand have been delivered
Yes to both. What do you mean, "or"?
Jul
2
comment Can this sentence be correct grammatically?
Fire the editor. Either they can't admit to a simple oversight and are trying to come up with insultingly contrived reasons thinking you're an idiot, or they genuinely think that all they have to check for is theoretical syntactic possibility, but never probability, or the slightest hint of meaning, or the tiniest grain of style. Frankly I do not know which is worse. Fire them now.
Jun
29
comment Is 'ditzel' a real word?
If he had Swabian roots, my money would be on a bißle. But you probably wouldn't have misheard a b for a d.
Jun
29
revised Why is the plural of “aircraft” not “aircrafts”?
deleted 308 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Jun
29
comment Does this word exist?
Please take a second to write a more meaningful title. You are asking about a specific word, so mention that specific word in the title, and not "this word", which applies to every word ever. Specific question titles attract more views, and thus more answers. Nobody clicks on vague titles.
Jun
29
comment is it grammatically correct to say “oh,If only I weren't tired ”
First off, "what kind of grammar is that" does not make sense in English. We don't have kinds of grammars. We have exactly one grammar. You will have to clarify what you are after. Second off, you don't believe a dictionary, but you will believe a random bunch of strangers off the Internet instead? There is something very wrong with this picture. Lastly, please search the site before asking.
Jun
29
comment To explain! there
What's the deal with the parentheses? What's the deal with the exclamation mark? What's the deal with not looking up the meaning of the word in a dictionary? Or do you need something else entirely? Then what's the deal with not clearly explaining what exactly it is you are after?
Jun
28
awarded  Favorite Question
Jun
26
comment Better use of the word “sorry”
1) Context is the only way to disambiguate between which version of any word a person is using. That's what "context" means. 2) The meaning of any word at all can be lost via miscommunication. That's what "miscommunication" means.
Jun
26
comment Generic term for a thing that is versioned
Any hypernym for such vastly different things as software, book, and car will be mind-bogglingly vague and useless, by definition. I am curious: what ever do you need a mind-bogglingly vague and useless word for? You do realize its usefulness will be at the level of thing and stuff, because that's how little cars and books have in common? What is the exact scenario you are looking to use the word in? Please elaborate.
Jun
26
comment Is there a word for a person who believes all events - past, present and future - have all been predetermined?
Never once heard predestinarian. Heard fatalist fifty million times. And not just in English. So you'll clearly be reaching a much bigger audience with the latter.