Reputation
70,896
Next tag badge:
686/400 score
56/80 answers
Badges
25 240 329
Newest
 Good Answer
Impact
~6.1m people reached

Jan
20
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
14
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
12
awarded  Guru
Jan
11
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
11
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
10
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
4
comment “Hover a link” vs “hover over a link”
Re: learning how to figure that kind of thing out by reading a dictionary, open the verb's entry in a dictionary of your liking and look for the terms transitive or intransitive (which your edit suggests you are aware of). In this case, if we take e.g. Merriam-Webster, the definition reads "intransitive verb". So you can hover in a boat, or over the ground. But you cannot hover a boat, nor can you hover the ground.
Jan
4
revised What's the difference between “dawn” and “dawning”?
added 4 characters in body; edited tags; edited title; edited tags
Jan
4
revised “How much is faster the train than the car?”
deleted 3 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Dec
31
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
28
comment Winners, Losers and ____________
@Fard: if I have a problem understanding a question, then the question is not clear enough. That's what "clear enough" means. That said, understanding English is not mandatory for being a mod, and never was. Staying on-topic without resorting to ad hominems, however, has always been mandatory for being a user.
Dec
28
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
22
comment Why are there multiple kinds of dashes in the English language?
This might have to do less with your rep and more with the font you have installed, or the resolution you have picked. It is certainly possible to imagine circumstances in which it gets hard to distinguish an ſ from an f, or a þ from a p or a half note. However, for as long as you can distinguish an n from an M, it will by definition be fairly trivial for you to also distinguish between an en dash and an em dash. That's what the names mean. One is as wide as an n, the other one is as wide as an M.
Dec
22
comment Winners, Losers and ____________
The quotes (well, the ones that pass for parseable English, anyway) quite nicely demonstrate the issue here: the authors had to make sure people understand what the heck they're talking about by putting drawer in the context of winner and loser. Remove the latter two and the sentences become funny to impenetrable. I can say "I'm a winner, baby", and I can say "I'm a loser, baby", but saying "I'm a drawer" will get me in a mental institution. Likewise for "He analyzed the beliefs of voters about drawers" or "Discriminant analysis leads to a correct classification of drawers".
Dec
22
comment Winners, Losers and ____________
@Araucaria I think you're missing my point. Or perhaps I am missing the OP's. Which, to my defense, I quite openly stated, asking them for clarification and an example sentence. Neither of which have been provided. Not by the OP, not by anyone else. So I have to stick to what I said.
Dec
22
comment Why are there multiple kinds of dashes in the English language?
@Minnow: yes, I can tell the difference without looking at the source. They all look completely different to me.
Dec
22
comment What's slang for “plot twist”?
If you mean a single word, that would be slang, uncountable. A slang refers to an entire language. Are you looking for an entire language or just one word?
Dec
22
comment Single-word request for a person who is arrogant, overconfident and insults others
Two words you could use would be arrogant and overconfident. As a bonus, these are the only words in the English language that mean "arrogant" and "overconfident". No other words mean that.
Dec
22
comment Why are there multiple kinds of dashes in the English language?
@PeterShor Beats me why we ordinary folk who aren't professional typesetters need so many different letters. While substitnting sone of then - like I jnst bib - loox horrible, is their any reel reason we need to different ways to spell "x" and three different ways to spell "their"? And I bet that in the old-fashioned days, printers had even more useless rubbish leþþerſ to work with.
Dec
21
comment Winners, Losers and ____________
It comes under no category, because there is no category. We, as a society, have not come up with a dedicated label for "all the people who've neither won nor lost", just like we have not come up with a dedicated label for "all the people who have neither killed nor been killed", or "all the dogs who have neither two nor zero tails", or "all the colors that are neither red nor violet", or "all the numbers that are neither zero nor infinity", or "all the notes that are neither A nor G". These are no useful concepts to us, and so we don't use them, and so we don't have labels for them.