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17h
comment relative large windows vs relatively large windows
Please provide evidence that "many people use relative large windows". (Should be trivial if that's actually the case.) Failing that, this is a loaded or rhetorical question, and as such off-topic.
18h
comment Expression in good business cv languageIs this expression in correct business language? “Graphic manage of trade licensings​ & collections”
It is neither grammatical nor makes sense. And not just in business language, but in any register, dialect, or idiolect. It is not English. If you are unable to tell that yourself, you should consider our dedicated sister site for learners of the language.
20h
revised Is “I like dogs but cats” a valid sentence?
added 1 character in body
23h
comment Location - sentence constructions
Perfectly fine. The word order in English much more flexible than you were taught (and then there's things like hyperbaton on top of that, ubiquitous especially in higher registers). If you learn a bogus rule, you are bound to find out that the rule is bogus.
23h
comment How to pronounce the polish name “Aronszajn”
@Janus: I think it was actually Armenian rather than Russian. I agree that since the name sounds a lot like a Yiddish compound, Andrew's suggestion is probably closer to the mark.
1d
comment English analogue for russian aphorism parody “for seven troubles there is single reset”
It's a play on words. There can be no such thing as an analogue in another language. Neither the word being played on nor the saying it is in exist in English. You cannot play on something that's not there. And you can't possibly expect that such a rare edge case is translatable at all. Even simple words such as мать are untranslatable, and you expect семь бед — один reset to be no biggie.
1d
comment I'm very confused of using that have/had
"You've found them" is correct. "You'd found them" is correct. "You'll find them" is correct. "You'll have been finding them" is correct. This is like asking if it should be "you found him" or "I saw her". Both are correct. They just mean entirely different things.
1d
comment What does it mean when someone says “noted” to you?
Okay so help me out of here. Regardless of whether this question is too basic for this site: why didn't you just ask your friend? They produced the word, they knew exactly what they meant, they were available for comment, and you were already talking to them. But rather than just asking them, you ask a bunch of random strangers off the Internet. Why?
1d
comment How to pronounce the polish name “Aronszajn”
/ərən'ʃaɪn/ is what I'd say, since English doesn't have a /ʂ/. In Polish I guess the stress would be on the O, but I don't know for certain.
1d
comment “Following” or “The following”?
Slang is “very informal usage in vocabulary and idiom that is characteristically more metaphorical, playful, elliptical, vivid, and ephemeral than ordinary language”. Neither "fhe following items" nor "following items" qualifies as slang.
1d
comment you are? vs are you? (with a question mark)
What is this, a dating site?
2d
comment Does the word prepone exist?
What do you mean, "does not exist in the dictionary"? What is "the dictionary"? I can name two dozen off the top of my head. Of which at least seven do have the word.
2d
comment how can I use “after” before a verb
Questions of the form "is there any problem with this sentence" are expressly off-topic here. The sentence is grammatically fine (though stylistically rubbish). What do you think is wrong? Why do you think that? What exactly is your question? Please elaborate. Thank you.
2d
comment [infinitive]How is it to work as a teacher? vs How is to work as a teacher?
There question "why" makes no sense when it comes to language. There is no reason why. And even if there were one, knowing it would not help you with anything. It just so happens that the fourth variant is what a native speaker would produce at this point in time, and the second one is not, and so if you want to pass for a native speaker at this point in time, you should use the fourth variant and not the second. If you don't want to pass for a native speaker, you are free to say whatever you want. Anything at all.
2d
comment I am unsure how to punctuate a sentence
The sentence needs exactly one punctuation mark, and it is very obvious which one it is.
Apr
14
comment Best way to practice Roots, Prefixes, and Suffixes
The only way to master English is by not practicing roots, prefixes, and suffixes. If you practice roots, prefixes, and suffixes, you will never do well. You will be outscored by any three-year old who doesn't even know the word "suffix" exists.
Apr
14
comment what does it mean?confused
Ask the person who wrote that sentence. If they are not available for comment, you will never know the meaning. The sentence is not English, and does not make sense in any language known to mankind. Nobody will be able to tell you what it means.
Apr
14
revised Hypernym for “for sale”, “for rent”, etc
deleted 140 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Apr
14
comment English word for this specific behavior
If you can't think of any word at all given all the context that you do have, then you cannot expect random strangers off the Internet to think of the perfect word without any context whatsoever. Is this on a specific occasion or in general? What are the circumstances? What is the reason? Did you insult her, did you kill her mother, is she suffering from a stroke right now? Why does it matter that she's your girlfriend? Or does it not? What is wrong with ignore? You just used it to explain it to us, why do you think you can't use it to explain it to others? Please elaborate.
Apr
14
revised “To this end” or “To that end”
edited tags