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bio website ideas.lego.com/projects/39075
location Europe, GMT+1
age 35
visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen 12 hours ago

Web designer. Instrument player. Book reader.

Oh, and you can vote for my LEGO Ideas project! Then my avatar could be yours to keep.


Mar
25
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
20
comment Use of the modal “can” in a sentence
The author might well mean something like "can get to know" or "can encounter" or something to that extent. But without seeing more of the context, that's impossible to tell for sure. "Can know" can be perfectly grammatical, and whether or not it is weird in this particular sentence depends on what this sentence particular is. You haven't provided the sentence, so we can't tell.
Mar
20
comment What do you call the source of a “said” quote?
The word is author. And Armen said so in the very first comment. Why is everyone after him falling over themselves trying to reinvent the bicycle? It is author. "Please provide the author of the quote." Not sayer, not orator, not speaker. It is author. And nobody at all will take that to mean "please provide a URL". So simple. Come on.
Mar
20
comment How to write this quote in a motivating way, for a poster?
You go to it or you go for it. You cannot just go it. The verb cannot be transitive in this meaning. That is decidedly ungrammatical.
Mar
20
comment “so close to doing” vs “about to do”
Because the second to is a preposition and not the infinitive marker. And a preposition requires a noun. And only the present participle can act as a noun, but the infinitive cannot.
Mar
20
comment On the duplicity of “peruse”
Peeving disguised as a question is off-topic.
Mar
20
comment Why do people say “Go down this road” or “Go down this corridor” instead of saying “Go straight”
The "why" part of the question hinges around two assumptions: 1) that the word "down" has an intrinsic meaning and 2) that it can have only one meaning at most. Neither assumption is true of any word in any language. In fact, no word in and of itself has any meaning at all. It means whatever people want it to mean. You have to use some word. And "down" is a word. As long as we all agree on it, everything's fine. If we all agreed to say "go cat" instead, then we'd use that one. If we all use "go orange", then that's what you get.
Mar
20
comment That was what I heard/had heard
It can be "what I heard", and it can be "what I had heard", and it can be "what I would hear", and it can be "what I was hearing", and it can be "what I would have heard", and so on and so forth. They just mean different things, is all.
Mar
20
comment Which one is the correct dialogue punctuation format?
You are the author. You decide. Clearly it makes more sense to have two separate sentences be two separate sentences, but if you want to write an entire novel without using a single period, go ahead.
Mar
18
comment quoting written material without punctuation
You keep the original quoted material correct by keeping the original quoted material correct. What you have is exactly right. You're only missing a period at the end.
Mar
18
comment “The answer[s] to big problems…” - plural or singular?
You don't answer a problem. You solve it. The solution already is an answer, and expressly labeling it as such is awkward to say the least. The OP is really looking to say "solutions to big problems are always small", or simpler still, "big problems have small solutions". Coincidentally, that would also help him in his brevity-is-wit endeavor.
Mar
18
comment “The answer[s] to big problems…” - plural or singular?
As an aside: rewriting will also help with the brevity thing. Saving three characters is no brevity, especially when half the words can be removed completely.
Mar
18
comment “The answer[s] to big problems…” - plural or singular?
Both are perfectly grammatical, and both are perfectly horrible. I'd rewrite from scratch.
Mar
18
revised “Escaped” and “retired”
edited tags; edited title
Mar
18
answered How do I punctuate this sentence? A stamp cost three cents a gallon of gas twenty
Mar
18
comment usage of HAS in tenses
The second half of this answer is precisely right. Sadly, the first half is nonsense. Once you know somebody, you do not know them forever. (For starters, you don't live forever. And then there's that thing called forgetting.) You can totally say "she knew me for two years", and you can totally say "she has returned". Both verbs can, and do, occur in either tense. The tenses just mean different things. Which is the whole point of having them in the first place.
Mar
18
comment What is it called when a group of people forms a shape together?
Related (for a group standing still): Term for people in artistic formation
Mar
16
comment Vocabulary advice for non native English speaker
The three books combined don't have a single mention of a null pointer, a stack, or a worst-case execution path. So no, they will not be enough.
Mar
16
comment A word or phrase for someone who is dull and unaware of it
I am not sure that anyone who's dull is aware of it. Otherwise they wouldn't be dull in the first place, right.
Mar
16
comment What online resource can I use to find sentences that use a word in a specific part of speech?
Any professional corpus, such as the Corpus of Contemporary American English or the British National Corpus. And arguably to some extent, any dictionary.