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1d
comment What is the correct way to phrase?
No. Do not ask this sort of question on ELL. Do not ask this sort of question anywhere. It makes no sense at all. What is correct: "I have a dog" or "I had a dog"?
1d
comment Is “I was who sent you the letter” grammatically correct?
Voting to reopen and migrate, as "I was the one who sent you" or "It was me who sent you" are the obvious Standard English constructions, while "I was who sent you" is not.
Apr
21
comment Is “Hello, World!” a sentence?
There is more than one definition of a sentence, and your example fits most of them. If you think that this is not a sentence, you are welcome to name it whatever you want. That won't change the fact that it is sitll a sentence by other definitions, and even more to the point, it won't change the fact that it is 100% impeccable English. You can take any English utterance and name it whatever you please, and it won't care one bit. No aspect of the world will change at all. It's just a label. Go ahead, label it X42 or Khabarovsk.
Apr
21
comment Correct usage of 'whoever' and 'whomever'
Well. It's incorrect. Not sure what advice I can give other than "do not say incorrect things".
Apr
21
comment Usage of proposition with congratulated
What preposition? You are not using any preposition there at all. You are using it transitively. Or do you actually mean proposition? Then the question is even less clear.
Apr
20
comment How can I correct “our firewall will have been providing Internet safety to our customers”?
Yes, it is safety for.
Apr
20
revised How can I correct “our firewall will have been providing Internet safety to our customers”?
added 2 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Apr
20
comment Meaning of “his”
Neither. It means C's house.
Apr
11
comment Expressing the relationship between two dates
No. Both wordings are not English. For a whole number of reasons. First off, as Andrew says, a native speaker would use before and after. "Start date is after end date". Second off, why is there a definite article before "end date", but no article before "start date"? Make your mind up. Either a definite article in both cases, or no article in both cases. Lastly, there is no such thing as "equal with". In English, it's "equal to".
Apr
11
revised Expressing the relationship between two dates
deleted 15 characters in body; edited tags
Apr
11
comment Is it correct to say “Our shop is under renewal process”?
"Under renewal" is fine. "Under process" is not. The shop can be in the process. In the process of renewal or whatever. But it cannot be under process of anything. That is not English.
Apr
7
revised “Move over the bridge” vs. “move on the bridge”
deleted 55 characters in body; edited title
Apr
5
comment Is “many a person” singular or plural?
@asef: the answers there do answer this question here, though.
Apr
5
revised Is “many a person” singular or plural?
edited tags; edited title
Apr
2
revised “Economic” vs. “economical”
edited tags; edited title
Mar
31
revised “Trivially translate” vs. “translate trivally” — which is corrent?
deleted 6 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Mar
31
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
30
comment Difference between “click” and “press”
Please provide an example sentence in which you think the two verbs are interchangeable. Failing that, this question does not really make much sense, as the two verbs mean very different things and are not generally interchangeable at all. Plus you've actually explained the difference yourself. You cannot click an elevator button IRL because there's no mouse involved. You can click it in a computer game, though.
Mar
30
revised Difference between “click” and “press”
added 1 character in body; edited tags; edited title
Mar
30
comment Question for - Its my 7th visit to Florida
This question has been asked, and answered, dozens of times before. Here are twenty for your convenience. Please use the site search before asking. Thanks.