2,890 reputation
815
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location Kennedale, TX
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen yesterday

I'm a Christian Dad and software guru. I do public speaking on request...send me an email if you're interested.

Here's a particularly useful (IMHO) answer I gave to a very common problem:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4719841/system-data-sqlclient-sqlexception-timeout-expired#4719892

And here's a snarky response to a bad question:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4729260/unofficial-stackoverflow-minimalist-coding-challenge#4729278


Dec
20
awarded  Yearling
Jul
29
comment Frequent use of word not found in dictionary, “programatically.”
I agree with both of you. But once you rule out more technical language like "via code", you're stuck to something more comprehensible to the layman like "automatically". If I were talking to another programmer, I would always say "programmatically".
Dec
20
awarded  Yearling
Dec
1
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
1
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
9
comment Is “the girls are want to gossip” correct?
I would say that it's an elegant way to say it, but not old-fashioned or outdated. Except insofar as we live in a crass, classless age.
Sep
24
comment Is the phrase “fire and brimstone” used by Americans or it is only in Bible?
Yeah, prolly so. I guess I'm closer to the "happy-clappy" side of Christianity :).
Aug
8
revised Do words “iron” and “irony” have anything in common?
deleted 1 characters in body
Jul
20
comment Non-offensive substitute for a swear word
Yeah, I saw that on the HBO show "Big Love". It brings to mind the evolution of Cockney slang...
Jul
20
awarded  Necromancer
May
7
comment How to use “you know”
I agree that those are valid inferences to be made when a speaker says that, but that's not the case in the specific example cited. In this case, the speaker is filling in dead space, giving their brain time to catch up with their mouth.
Feb
23
comment “Except for” vs “Except In”
I think the point the speaker is trying to make is that they COULDN'T have met since the campaign. I would use: "We've had no opportunity to meet since the campaign."
Feb
23
comment “Up until that time” sounds awkward — is there a better way to say it?
"Hitherto" is a great word - and we shouldn't treat great words like fine China that we place in the cabinet and never use.
Feb
23
comment How to use “you know”
@David Schwartz - Face to face, there's probably enough body language to avoid this, but I can definitely see this happening on the phone, where a pause is positively painful.
Feb
19
comment When referring to a previously sent text, would you say 'I text you about that' or 'I texted you about that'?
@Anwulf - good to know...then it's no longer even a neologism.
Jan
19
comment How to say that food is hot (temperature) without the listener thinking that I mean “spicy”?
This answer is immediately, obviously correct. Why? Why is it clear that "piping" indicates thermal and not gustatory temperature?
Dec
20
awarded  Yearling
Dec
19
comment Why father is called “dada” and not “fafa”
Another point along these lines is that, in my experience, babytalk regresses towards reduplication. My two year-old pronounces "Captain America" (a fixture in our household) as "Kukka Mukka".