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Apr
10
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
7
awarded  Yearling
Mar
13
accepted What happens to articles in phrases “a bit <adjective> <noun>”?
Mar
13
comment What happens to articles in phrases “a bit <adjective> <noun>”?
@Cerberus ok, I'm convinced that "of a" is the correct form. But interpreting "a bit of a ..." here as "a bit of something" sounds really odd. (Also, care to put this as an answer?)
Mar
13
comment What happens to articles in phrases “a bit <adjective> <noun>”?
@Cerberus: interesting. What's the grammatical role of "of a" here?
Mar
13
asked What happens to articles in phrases “a bit <adjective> <noun>”?
Feb
2
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
26
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
17
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
16
revised Meaning of “dog” in the “updog” joke
edited title
Jan
16
comment Meaning of “dog” in the “updog” joke
@FumbleFingers if you read past the first couple of paragraphs, you may realize that this question is not about the wordplay aspect of the joke, but about the word dog in it. I'll edit the title to make that more apparent. Or are you concerned with the fact that the context here is provided by a wordplay joke?
Jan
16
accepted Meaning of “dog” in the “updog” joke
Jan
16
revised Meaning of “dog” in the “updog” joke
added 60 characters in body
Jan
16
asked Meaning of “dog” in the “updog” joke
Aug
3
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
2
revised Order of universal and existential quantifier
deleted 35 characters in body
Aug
2
answered Order of universal and existential quantifier
Aug
2
comment Meaning/origin of “You bet” as a response to “Thank you”
"he is telling the guest that his time is appreciated" — exactly. So, "You bet" as a response sounds like "Of course my time is appreciated!" or "Of course you are grateful", which to me seems rude. What am I missing?
Aug
2
asked Meaning/origin of “You bet” as a response to “Thank you”
Jul
2
awarded  Notable Question