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seen Jul 15 at 18:53

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2
awarded  Curious
Jun
18
awarded  Constituent
Jun
18
awarded  Caucus
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12
awarded  Custodian
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awarded  Custodian
May
11
reviewed Approve suggested edit on “Thank you very much” vs. “Thank you so much”
May
8
comment Do animals “live, reside or inhabit” in a place?
I agree. That's because using the simple present sounds weird here. "Wolves live in Alaska" also sounds off to me, but that's perhaps because we know they inhabit other regions of the planet as well. Take a look at the example sentences here: inhabit.
May
8
comment Do animals “live, reside or inhabit” in a place?
To be clear, saying "an animal inhabits Alaska" is perfectly fine, isn't it, and you prefer the verb live to inhabit here because of the preposition in?
Apr
30
comment Singular of “dice”
See dice defined here. See also the example sentences. ("Gauss's guess was based on throwing a dice with one side marked ‘prime’ and the others all blank.") It also links to the definition of the singular die. It appears that the OED recognizes both die and dice as singular forms. It might be that with the number one, people still use die, while with the article a, they might use dice.
Apr
30
comment Relative Clause: 'that' & 'which'
Possible duplicate: When to use “that” and when to use “which”
Apr
30
comment Can I use the word “flesh” when referring to plants/crops?
I agree. Mass sounds more appropriate than flesh for a potato.
Apr
30
comment Why do they address me “Dear (surname)”?
I think the best thing to do is sign off with the name you want to be called and then print your full name below in the signature section. (For example, you sign off with "Regards, Edward/Eddie" and then print "Edward Smith, ABC & Co., Timbuktoo" below this as your signature.
Apr
30
comment Done and dusted
+1 See also oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/….
Apr
30
comment Can I use the word “flesh” when referring to plants/crops?
How would you describe the stuff inside the skin of the potato? Would you call it flesh? I think I might call the insides of a jackfruit flesh, but not those of a potato. Then what would the word be?
Apr
7
comment When did “Pensylvania” become “Pennsylvania”?
@JasonC, right. Don't know what I was thinking. My apologies, Joe.
Apr
5
comment When did “Pensylvania” become “Pennsylvania”?
It says "sic" after "Pensylvania" on the Liberty Bell link you've cited.
Feb
7
comment Why is 'present perfect' present if it happened in the past? And why is it 'perfect'?
Thanks @Wayne, I've expanded my answer based on your feedback.
Feb
7
revised Why is 'present perfect' present if it happened in the past? And why is it 'perfect'?
Edited answer based on feedback in a comment
Dec
27
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
20
awarded  Yearling