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visits member for 3 years, 10 months
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Feb
21
comment What is the term for accusing a person of mischief through invented, twisting and changeable terminology?
Causistry simply means using examples or "cases" to support an argument. The examples do not have to be terminology, nor are they necessarily invented or confusing.
Feb
14
comment Who is ‘Sarah Palin impersonator’?
Readers of The Politico can safely be assumed to be very familiar with events at CPAC, if you get my drift.
Feb
12
comment What is the word for the emotion I feel when I see someone being humiliated?
I do not believe that all people have the same emotion in this situation.
Feb
9
comment Why is “math” always pluralized in British English and singular in American English?
[citation needed]
Feb
9
comment Why is “math” always pluralized in British English and singular in American English?
Google NGram shows "math" in use from the 1700s, and much more common than "maths" since their earliest records; ngrams.googlelabs.com/…
Feb
7
comment When and how should I use multiple exclamation marks?
The problem is that repeating the same punctuation only reiterates the same level of enthusiasm. It does not indicate a greater level of enthusiasm any more than "enthusiasm enthusiasm enthusiasm" does.
Feb
6
comment Why does American English pluralize certain singular nouns?
"At the university"? "In the hospital"? That would make sense only if there were exactly one of each in existence.
Feb
6
comment Word for “someone who does the same job as me”
A counterpart is something that opposes or balances, i.e. "counters", something else. If someone does the same job as you for an opponent then that person would be your counterpart, but not if that person were working on your side. For two people on the same side to be counterparts they would have to somehow oppose each other. It is possible for two people on the same side with the same job to counter each other, if the job was somehow competitive, but this is by no means necessary.
Jan
25
comment Why is the “ph” pronounced like a “v” in “Stephen”? Is this the only word like that?
@Stephen, just tell them the name is Greek, not English.
Jan
25
comment Why is the “ph” pronounced like a “v” in “Stephen”? Is this the only word like that?
It doesn't include a "ph", but Siobhan is pronounced "sha-VON".
Jan
18
comment Looking for the name of a method of wilderness navigation
Wictionary says orienteering uses a map and compass: en.wiktionary.org/wiki/orienteering
Jan
16
comment What is the origin of the phrase “blue moon”? Any alternate phrase for it?
This meaning is disputed, but is not unusual: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
Jan
9
comment Does “was sent flying off the horse” imply bumping?
@brilliant, constructs like "was sent flying" are called "passive voice" in English, and are discouraged precisely because it is unclear what caused the thing to happen. However, writers use it when they intentionally want to make it unclear what caused or did something.
Jan
9
comment What is the difference between “that's odd”, “that' s weird”, and “that's strange”?
Another thing to keep in mind is these are all subjective experiences; what is odd to one person may be strange but not odd to another, weird only to a third, all three to another person, and none to someone else.
Jan
6
comment Why does “ow” have two different sounds
There are many more sounds in English than letters in the alphabet. Obviously, then, some letters must have more than one sound.
Jan
5
comment Is there a list of all English words (singular and plural) anywhere on the net?
Impossible. There is no Academy that defines what "English words" are and, even if there was, words are being added and changed so often that, if one existed, it would be obsolete in an instant.
Dec
23
comment How to use “you know”
Not "message-free", even in theory. Their message is "I don't want you to respond".
Dec
23
comment What's the word for 'online-extrovert-offline-introvert'?
I would not use such a term; it sounds extremely faddish, and does not specify whether the person is an on-line introvert or extrovert.
Dec
20
comment Meaning of “pro” before a noun
Agreed. However, the usage of "pro" meaning "in favor of" is usually followed by a dash, as in "pro-American". Note the difference between a "pro football group" and a "pro-football group".
Dec
20
comment What is the term for pricing items just below a significant value (e.g. $19,995)
In our case this was not publicized at all. Flyers would say things like "does not apply to discount items", and when we changed the shields, prices like $19.99 always said "Discount!" or something. As I said, most of the staff didn't even know this.