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location California
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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
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Feb
6
comment Why does American English pluralize certain singular nouns?
"At the university"? "In the hospital"? That would make sense only if there were exactly one of each in existence.
Feb
6
comment Word for “someone who does the same job as me”
A counterpart is something that opposes or balances, i.e. "counters", something else. If someone does the same job as you for an opponent then that person would be your counterpart, but not if that person were working on your side. For two people on the same side to be counterparts they would have to somehow oppose each other. It is possible for two people on the same side with the same job to counter each other, if the job was somehow competitive, but this is by no means necessary.
Jan
25
comment Why is the “ph” pronounced like a “v” in “Stephen”? Is this the only word like that?
@Stephen, just tell them the name is Greek, not English.
Jan
25
comment Why is the “ph” pronounced like a “v” in “Stephen”? Is this the only word like that?
It doesn't include a "ph", but Siobhan is pronounced "sha-VON".
Jan
22
answered “Whole” vs. “entire”
Jan
22
answered Is there a reason behind the ordering of letters in the English alphabet?
Jan
18
comment Looking for the name of a method of wilderness navigation
Wictionary says orienteering uses a map and compass: en.wiktionary.org/wiki/orienteering
Jan
16
revised Differentiating between “written” and “writing”
grammar
Jan
16
comment What is the origin of the phrase “blue moon”? Any alternate phrase for it?
This meaning is disputed, but is not unusual: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
Jan
16
answered Differentiating between “written” and “writing”
Jan
16
awarded  Commentator
Jan
9
comment Does “was sent flying off the horse” imply bumping?
@brilliant, constructs like "was sent flying" are called "passive voice" in English, and are discouraged precisely because it is unclear what caused the thing to happen. However, writers use it when they intentionally want to make it unclear what caused or did something.
Jan
9
comment What is the difference between “that's odd”, “that' s weird”, and “that's strange”?
Another thing to keep in mind is these are all subjective experiences; what is odd to one person may be strange but not odd to another, weird only to a third, all three to another person, and none to someone else.
Jan
9
answered What is the difference between “that's odd”, “that' s weird”, and “that's strange”?
Jan
6
comment Why does “ow” have two different sounds
There are many more sounds in English than letters in the alphabet. Obviously, then, some letters must have more than one sound.
Jan
5
comment Is there a list of all English words (singular and plural) anywhere on the net?
Impossible. There is no Academy that defines what "English words" are and, even if there was, words are being added and changed so often that, if one existed, it would be obsolete in an instant.
Jan
5
answered What are your favorite English language tools?
Dec
23
comment How to use “you know”
Not "message-free", even in theory. Their message is "I don't want you to respond".
Dec
23
answered How to use “you know”
Dec
23
revised Enquiry about the bus route
spelling