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2d
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Searching for a rare word for “something taken as truth due to having been repeated so much”
2d
comment Why does the phrase “to take the rag off” mean to excel in the classroom?
It's also not that widely used in the U.S. This is the first time I'd ever heard it (and I've lived here since elementary school).
2d
comment A one line rhyme?
Possibly related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/130814/…
Apr
10
comment What's another way to describe a circular continuum?
Not at all central to your question, but the phrase is one and the same.
Apr
9
reviewed Approve suggested edit on use of “is” or “are”
Mar
31
comment What is the plural of peafowl?
You could sidestep the issue by saying "the peacock's mission is clear: to create as many peachicks as possible". (Not that the need is great; it sounds fine and is perfectly clear to say "baby peafowl" here.)
Mar
31
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Why is there no plural indefinite article?
Mar
30
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Can your use of Latin-derived words indicate your social class?
Mar
27
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
27
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
26
answered What are people who 'flee' called?
Mar
25
answered How should I refer to people who have been shared something with
Mar
24
comment What is a term for using a large word that the speaker/writer clearly thinks means something other than what it does?
@EdwinAshworth: So this question is indeed a duplicate after all, but not so much for questions where the best answer is malapropism. The unfortunate thing is that this kind of question is difficult to find via search unless you already know the answer. The duplicate linked above is definitely not the best match for this question. Better matches would be this or this.
Mar
24
comment What is a term for using a large word that the speaker/writer clearly thinks means something other than what it does?
@AmyBlankenship: Those who are not immediately dismissing your question as a duplicate are getting distracted by your ill-chosen example. I think you should consider editing your question with better examples. Perhaps someone uses obviate when they mean "to make obvious". I personally know of someone who consistently and intentionally uses concatenate to mean "truncate", because she honestly believes that's what it means.
Mar
24
comment What is a term for using a large word that the speaker/writer clearly thinks means something other than what it does?
I think it's clear that OP has chosen a poor example to illustrate her question. That said, if you can get past that and look at the substance of her question, it's just as clear that malapropism isn't what she's looking for.
Mar
24
comment What is a term for using a large word that the speaker/writer clearly thinks means something other than what it does?
@EdwinAshworth: Putting aside OP's example and just dealing with the question at face value, catachresis wouldn't be a bad answer.
Mar
21
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What is a word that means “a person or thing which is small yet capable of defeating big giants”?
Mar
18
comment Tom, Jake and Jenny aren't looking forward to Thanksgiving. Why?
While Drake is certainly a name, I expect it wasn't a common given name until relatively recently. Even as a surname, it's not clear to me that naming humans Drake preceded calling male ducks drakes. (I have no citations for any of this, except that Merriam-Webster lists "14th century" for first known use of drake to mean male duck.)
Mar
15
reviewed Reject suggested edit on A single word for someone who is quick to hate others