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comment Does 'no useful info' unequivocally mean 'some info is present?
A scientifically precise speaker would have at least a couple of reasons not to simply omit useful: (1) They might not know whether some kind of not-useful information is being transmitted. (2) The stronger statement might not serve some larger point they are trying to make. The scientific way to interpret a statement like "no parking on Sundays" is to allow for the possibility that there is also no parking on other days, but we don't know.
Apr
28
revised Does 'no useful info' unequivocally mean 'some info is present?
Addressed another part of OP's extended text
Apr
28
answered Does 'no useful info' unequivocally mean 'some info is present?
Apr
27
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
@arrivalin: The point of Martha's comment is that dyspepsia is also too inaccurate to use as a euphemism for diarrhea. She is reinforcing Jules's comments. Dyspepsia implies difficulties keeping stuff from coming up through the esophagus; diarrhea implies difficulties keeping stuff from going down through the colon. You see, they are in completely opposite "directions".
Apr
27
reviewed Edit Term to describe when one event cannot occur without the other
Apr
27
revised Term to describe when one event cannot occur without the other
better word choice
Apr
25
reviewed Reject Is it Game time or game-time?
Apr
19
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
Since we have kind of too many answers already, I guess I'll count this one as a variation on stomach bug, which is the term I've heard most commonly and which, to me, sounds more professional. (Tummy bug sounds like a term you'd use when talking to a child.)
Apr
19
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
This answer starts well but goes downhill. I can't bring myself to upvote it because I don't want to support the content at the bottom. If @WayneWerner's comment were an answer, it would be my top choice.
Apr
12
reviewed Reject Synonym for not taking personal responsibility
Mar
30
reviewed Approve What is the word for always YES (100%) or always NO (0%), never in-between
Mar
30
reviewed Reject Why is “lucked out” such a good thing to be?
Mar
29
reviewed Approve Is there an English term for being enraged by injustice, or having an extreme emotional stress because of injustice?
Mar
4
comment What is an organization that accepts donations?
I know you chose your example carefully. But that's more care than is likely needed. The legal definition of charity is different everywhere, as is the legal definition of nonprofit organization. It may well be just as "misleading" to call your example a nonprofit. Also note that the Localgiving page for your example group has a box labeled "Charity information" with the name and phone number for that group.
Mar
4
comment What is an organization that accepts donations?
I don't know. While OP hasn't exactly closed the door on entities that aren't charities, the text of the question does seem to at least emphasize "social upliftment" and "charitable organizations". Both charities and nonprofits have "specific legal status".
Mar
4
comment What is an organization that accepts donations?
Nonprofit (or the more in-vogue not-for-profit) is "more general" than charity, but it is isn't a perfect superset, since there is such a thing as a for-profit charitable entity (so far, these are much more rare than not-for-profit charities, but they are increasing in number). Also, OP mentioned "social upliftment" and seems to be concentrating mainly if not wholly on charitable organizations.
Feb
25
revised What is a word similar to “amateur” yet having a strong connotation of someone who likes something?
Added definition for support
Feb
25
answered What is a word similar to “amateur” yet having a strong connotation of someone who likes something?
Feb
21
reviewed Reject Is “too, once” or “once, too” correct?
Feb
21
comment Single word to express an object having the capacity to stretch a larger radius than another object?
@Drew: Lay people do not think or talk like physicists. When normal people hear "more readily stretchable", they may well think either or both of "more easily stretchable" or "stretchable to a greater extent". And indeed, for a lot of real-world substances that lay people are likely to encounter in their daily lives, these properties are correlated anyway. The distinction is all the more fuzzy if you simply use the phrase "more stretchable", which you seem to be saying is what should be used instead of "more elastic". But elastic and stretchable are basically synonymous in lay speech.