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reviewed Approve Is there a word for “colors in the order of the rainbow”?
Apr
18
reviewed Approve Is there a term for a word that defeats its own purpose?
Apr
16
awarded  Reviewer
Apr
16
reviewed Approve You can vs. You may
Apr
16
reviewed Approve What is the perfect word/idiom/phrase for a situation when enforcement of a system is futile?
Apr
16
reviewed Approve What's the difference between “zero in” and “home in”?
Apr
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
14
reviewed Reject How can this be rephrased better?
Apr
14
reviewed Approve Word to describe someone who rarely gets upset
Apr
14
reviewed Approve Word to describe someone who rarely gets upset
Apr
6
reviewed Reject An adjective with “knowledge”
Apr
1
comment Are there English figurative expressions equivalent to Japanese idiom 馬耳東風 meaning a person who doesn’t listen to other’s advice?
@Jim: You can be fired for being obstinate or for being scatterbrained. You've captured the wrong one with the main part of your answer.
Apr
1
comment Are there English figurative expressions equivalent to Japanese idiom 馬耳東風 meaning a person who doesn’t listen to other’s advice?
Well, there are two answers here. Fell on deaf ears is OK. But in one ear and out the other does not capture the same spirit as what is being asked in the question. If something goes in one ear and out the other, it's not so much that the person who owns the ears is obstinate; it's that the person who owns the ears is either forgetful or not paying attention.
Apr
1
reviewed Reject Are there English figurative expressions equivalent to Japanese idiom 馬耳東風 meaning a person who doesn’t listen to other’s advice?
Mar
29
reviewed Reject SAT grammar question: Why is this “them” incorrect?
Mar
28
reviewed Reject What is the origin of the word “copper” for referring to a police officer?
Mar
28
reviewed Reject In the direction opposite to me
Mar
27
reviewed Reject “why oh why” or “why, oh why”?
Mar
26
reviewed Reject Using “wish” to express regret in the present and in the past
Mar
23
reviewed Approve Big man? “Thank you, my big man.”