3,625 reputation
1929
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen yesterday

Jul
28
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What word can I use instead of “tomorrow” that is not connected with the idea of the rising sun?
Jul
27
reviewed Reject suggested edit on When did the term “flip flop” displace the term “thong” in North America for a type of sandal?
Jul
23
revised More emphatic term for “Expert”?
Preemptively "soften" the bold by using italics (seems to be more acceptable than bold alone, judging by tchrist's selection of edits)
Jul
23
answered More emphatic term for “Expert”?
Jul
22
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What does “had had” mean? How does this differ from “had”?
Jul
22
comment More emphatic term for “Expert”?
You don't have to couch this by saying it has "cultural connotations". For all intents and purposes, this is simply the Japanese word for master, and by now I think it's well-enough understood in English, so it does serve as an answer to the question.
Jul
22
comment More emphatic term for “Expert”?
This may well be the best answer for OP's specific use, but it's clearly not the best answer for the question as written.
Jul
22
comment More emphatic term for “Expert”?
@ClassicThunder: A lot of words take on both positive and negative connotations. Pretty much any ostensibly positive word can take on a negative meaning simply by saying it with enough of a sneer. The very fact that it can be used sarcastically derives from its nonsarcastic (more intrinsic) meaning.
Jul
20
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What's the word for a tiny sharp piece of wood under your skin?
Jul
19
comment Programming vs. Coding
@Henry74: The first link in my comment is, I think, the better one by far. What it is trying to say is not so much that hack has multiple meanings (which it does, strictly speaking), but that hacking encompasses all of them, and that a hacker is just as likely to make a quick-and-dirty hack as a brilliant, ingenious hack... and that sometimes those are one and the same hack.
Jul
19
comment Saying “programming” vs “coding”
Things are cyclical. Yes, there was a time when coding was the usual term, and then it became old-fashioned. It had different connotations back then (coding was a rote task, essentially manual labor; while programming was higher-level, with more creativity and logic). Well, coding is back (smartphone developers are referred to as coders, and parents ask if their kids should learn to code), and programming is actually (slightly, for now) old-fashioned (because programmers are the ones who still sit at desktop computers and prefer full keyboards).
Jul
19
comment Programming vs. Coding
@Henry74: Hacker has a distinct meaning to whom? Have you read this or this? I disagree with the simplistic "unwise shortcuts" characterization. You said roughly, but I contend that's too rough. You have to also include the brilliance angle.
Jul
19
comment Programming vs. Coding
This is a decent answer, though I believe coding is actually gaining ground in modern, popular usage. It's shorter and catchier than programming, and I actually find that it has less competition from other common meanings right now (mid-2014). Folks keep asking me (because I'm a programmer) whether they should get their kids to learn to code. No one asks me if their kids should learn to program. Programming feels a little old-fashioned these days, to be honest.
Jul
18
comment Why is it “have someone wrapped around your LITTLE finger”?
To me, the phrase "wrapped around one's (little) finger" has more to do with feelings of affection (the owner of the finger is doted upon by the person wrapped around that finger) than of control per se. Certainly not forcible dominance by the finger owner, which is what is implied by "(falcon) under one's thumb" where the force required may be small, but it's still required. In the little finger case, the doter is wrapping himself around the dotee's finger, willingly and happily, not trying to get away.
Jul
18
revised What is the difference between “speaking” and “talking”?
I didn't mean for my example to be a noun, they were two *different* examples, *plus* an "etc.". The previous edit should have been rejected as "too minor".
Jul
18
comment Binary counterpart to decade
How does this make base-2 "funny"? Adding another digit in any base is the same as increasing the power (exponent) in that base. "10^5 to 10^6" is a decade. The phrase "within a power of 10 of 10^12" means "within a decade of 10^12".
Jul
16
comment Binary counterpart to decade
@Potatoswatter: The references I quoted (for decade and octave) specifically mention frequency ratios (which are inherently suited to be represented graphically on a logarithmic scale) and have nothing to do with logic circuits. As of this writing, there aren't any readily available references for binary decade the way you want it to be used, because it's simply not (yet) an established term. I only suggested it (as a neologism) because it would work, if you really can't bear to use octave. But you mention engineering school. Engineers definitely use octave.
Jul
14
answered Inventory Report - Item and Quantity
Jul
14
revised Binary counterpart to decade
added 345 characters in body
Jul
14
answered Binary counterpart to decade