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seen Jul 20 at 16:14

Jul
20
asked Passive voice expressed by means of the active voice
Jun
21
awarded  Caucus
Jun
21
awarded  Constituent
Apr
16
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
23
awarded  Yearling
Nov
12
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
24
comment “my friend” vs “a friend of mine”
do you mean that "a week" doesn't mean 1 week? "the friend of mine" is not what I suggest to say, it should be "my friend" instead. My point is that "a" means "one of at least two".
Sep
23
awarded  Critic
Sep
23
comment “my friend” vs “a friend of mine”
I think that "a friend of mine" can't imply that the total number of friends is at least one. Because in that case there would be the article "the" used. Don't you think so? As "a" means one of at least two.
Jun
5
awarded  Informed
Jun
4
comment Is this typical for the Present Simple?
Thank you Jay. I think you understand that a lot of subtleties are not that easy to spot when English is not your first language. For example, I would like to know why you find "talk" and "watch" to be a bad match in this case. Is it just a hunch or something else? I can easily imagine a person speaking on the phone and watching waves.
Jun
4
asked Is this typical for the Present Simple?
May
16
comment “How dare you” vs “How do you dare”
MT_Head, How would you say "How dare you" in the Past? It should be a "modal" dare. If we say "How did you dare" then it gets another meaning, right? Shall we stick to "How dared you do" or what?
May
15
asked Dare + have done
Apr
6
asked Future Subjunctive
Feb
20
comment could versus be able
livresque - both
Feb
19
comment could versus be able
Jon, clarify please! Am I right on the following? If we add to this sentence "I could run 10km in under 40minutes" the word "yesterday" then it becomes incorrect? That is, "I could run 10km in under 40minutes" - CORRECT (some time in the past) / "I could run 10km in under 40minutes yesterday" - incorrect.
Feb
19
asked could versus be able
Jan
10
comment Is there any difference between Present Perfect and Present Perfect Continuous?
Oh, I see. So would this one be wrong: I have learnt English for the past few weeks.
Jan
10
comment Is there any difference between Present Perfect and Present Perfect Continuous?
oops another thought. Does "in" have something to do with "completion"? "I have learnt English in the past few weeks" - completion is implied. BUT: "I have learnt English for the past few weeks" - doesn't sound like completion is implied. May be it also has something to do with "in" and "for"?