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  • 37 votes cast
Apr
14
comment Derogatory word, describing person (a pupil) who memorizes instead of learning?
@jpers I go to school in Canada. The curriculum everywhere has to be this bad, unless you expect an engineering degree to last eight to ten years. Employers simply expect someone coming out of an engineering program to have a shallow understanding of a broad array of topics; there's no way around it. Academically, this makes for an extremely poor environment, but it is useful for employers so that is how it is structured.
Apr
5
comment “Lunch” vs. “dinner” vs. “supper” — times and meanings?
If I had the dataset, I could normalize the weight by population concentration
Mar
22
comment Derogatory word, describing person (a pupil) who memorizes instead of learning?
@jpers I'm in an engineering discipline, and the broad range of topics I'm expected to gain a shallow understanding of necessitates rote learning. There is simply not enough time to go through the textbook for every subject and understand the mathematical model and its derivation, especially with the quantity of work you are expected to hand in. For most of the topics I care about I will go through the textbook for a deeper understanding once the course is over, but doing this for every subject simultaneously is simply not possible. Focused rote learning is necessary.
Mar
18
comment Derogatory word, describing person (a pupil) who memorizes instead of learning?
Rote learning puts you ahead of the curve in your final years of school, not behind. The concepts involved in the subject become progressively more complex but the time allotted to learn them remains unchanged.
Oct
19
awarded  Yearling
Jun
20
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
23
comment What is the term that means to add an extra syllable to a word?
@BenPlont Both of the examples you showed were epenthesis of a vowel, so the most specific term is anaptyxis.
Apr
23
answered What is the term that means to add an extra syllable to a word?
Apr
19
awarded  Autobiographer
Dec
13
comment “Masters degree” — capital M or not?
@LaBarrister Do you complain when someone says, "I like the color red"?
Nov
24
awarded  Famous Question
Nov
21
comment Is there a term for a word inside another word?
Abso-bloody-lutely isn't a word in the English language.
Nov
3
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
@BlueRaja That is the wrong extrapolation here. You were taking exception to the absence of a noun following the adjective "needful". The existence of an arbitrary number of nonsensical "do the x" expressions does not invalidate "<verb> the <(nounal) adjective>" expressions as a whole, so "do the needful" is fine, as is "eat the meek" and "remember the departed". Needful can mean someone who is in need, but it is not incorrect to use it in the sense of something that is necessary.
Nov
3
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
@BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft Do that which is needful. It isn't really that hard. "Do that which is needed", if this helps you comprehend. Regarding "the needful what?", would you complain about "the brave what and the bold what"?
Oct
19
awarded  Yearling
Aug
2
comment What is the real difference between dilation and dilatation?
In engineering at least, the term dilatation is synonymous with volume strain. That is to say, material undergoes dilatation when there is a net change in its volume in response to applied stresses, in addition to any changes in its dimensions.
Jul
26
comment A word or phrase for 'Holy grail' (a goal impossible to achieve)
This is a snowclone in the same sense as it is an expression. This is not specific enough, and most of this answer doesn't have anything to do with the question (I'm not sure if the question has been edited). From the link you gave us, a number of other plug-and-play cliches (that have nothing to do with unattainable goals) are also snowclones.
Jul
8
comment Looking for a word that describes when you say both possible outcomes
A tautology perhaps?
Jun
16
awarded  Constituent
Jun
16
awarded  Caucus