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comment “An other” vs “another”
There is a reason: another blocks the ungrammatical combination *an other.
Jul
23
revised What to call a person who always says he can do everything?
fix spelling; fix citation (the ODE is not the OED)
Jul
23
revised For non-modal/auxiliary verb, is the non-3rd person singular present form always the same as the base form?
added 2 characters in body
Jul
21
comment What's a less offensive substitute for “rep-whores”?
I think this is the best answer, since as you point out, rep farming is a term in actual use. I think it's more likely to be understood with the intended meaning than rep hound.
Jul
16
comment What is it called when someone uses your name to describe an act?
Although in examples like "Stop being a Bob" or "pull a Homer", the name in question is being used as a noun, not a verb.
Jul
2
reviewed Leave Open What do you call the inner leaves of a tree?
Jul
2
reviewed Close Non standard english: Slang. “That sucks man.”
Jul
2
reviewed Leave Open What do you call someone who is favored by a higher authority?
Jul
2
reviewed Leave Open What is this type of idiom called: “I know he's not the smartest person in the world, but…”
Jul
2
reviewed Leave Open Is it common to use “perverted” (as in a pervert) as an adjective?
Jun
28
revised Can someone help me to understand this difficult sentence structure?
added 5 characters in body
Jun
28
comment What to call words with permanent prefix, but no unprefixed form? (ex: nonchalant, untoward)
"I dreamt of a corrigible nocuous youth, Gainly, gruntled and kempt; A mayed and sidious fellow forsooth; Ordinate, effable, shevelled, ept, couth; A delible fellow I dreamt." (A Dream of Couth, from A Game of Words)
Jun
16
awarded  Notable Question
May
20
comment Is “cause” instead of “because” becoming Standard English?
The Standard English Dictionary? Is that figurative?
May
19
comment How do you write the expression of disgust that sounds like “er”?
American speakers would be rather confused by a spelling with 'R', as the large majority of us are rhotic speakers.
May
19
comment Is using “wish” like this exclusive to India?
I don't see why this question has a close vote. I think monotransitive wish is a well known feature of Indian English. It's described in Indian and British English: A Handbook of Usage and Pronunciation (2004, p.197) and Contemporary Indian English: Variation and Change (2009, p.106), for example. It's not a feature of AmE or BrE (for example), and an answer can plainly say so and answer the rest of the OP's questions.
May
17
comment What does “well you” after a comma mean?
@FumbleFingers It didn't seem like a riddle to me. The meaning was clear. (It doesn't really matter to me whether you close it or not. It's your site, not mine. But the meaning was apparent, so I left a comment.)
May
17
comment What does “well you” after a comma mean?
It doesn't look like non-native English to me. It looks like each well is a filler word. "Your body size doesn't make you you!" It's probably hard to tell because of how the commas were used (or not used).
May
16
revised What is the best word (or term) to identify pronouncing W's for L's and R's?
added 714 characters in body
May
16
awarded  Good Question