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/ˈsneɪlboʊt/


5h
comment Where an ellipsis exists, is there a term for the missing text?
@DanBron Many linguists distinguish between elide and ellipt, reserving the former for the omission of a sound or sounds and the latter for the omission of a word or words. In that sense, ellipted works but elided would be inappropriate.
Aug
21
comment “Somewhere” - is it really a pronoun?
Although it is not usually classified as a pronoun, some dictionaries do give this classification, so it's a fair thing to ask about. For example, the Oxford Dictionary of English (not the OED!) lists it under both adverb and pronoun. In A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, it is listed as a compound adverb (p.438). In the non-traditional analysis of The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, it is instead classified as something they call a "compound determinative"; see p.423 for details.
Aug
20
comment Omitting the “I” from “I am” the second clause in a sentence?
I don't think the comma is actually necessary (or perhaps even desirable) but it's certainly possible to add it.
Aug
19
comment Antonym (or dual) for 'anachronism'
You could say the opposite of anachronism was catachronism if you wanted, but it seems that very few people want.
Aug
19
comment Why don't we use an apostrophe to denote ownership on 'it'?
But if you separate category from function as CGEL does, you can say that its is a possessive pronoun with determiner function.
Aug
19
comment Meaning - 'of us'
If this were written today, the comma before which would almost certainly not be there.
Aug
19
comment Subject-Verb Agreement - was/were
Jason Smith, conjoined subjects typically take plural agreement. This is no exception and were is the better choice, but consider sentences like "drinking and driving is a dangerous combination" or "peanut butter and jelly is my favorite flavor". Unfortunately there is no simple and general answer. @GeorgePompidou The subject is the noun phrase a bag of carrots and half a tomato. I'm sure the OP can count; please Be Nice.
Aug
19
comment Is this phrase “2- or 4-person” correct?
Look up suspended hyphens.
Aug
18
comment “Her whole family IS/ARE biologists”?
@AppFzx Many libraries, especially school libraries, have a copy of CGEL in the reference section. I'd suggest you check the library before buying a copy :-)
Aug
18
comment Simple sentence that I'm not sure is right
The OP has already re-posted their question on ELL. Since this copy of the question has answers, if the ELU mods feel they have any value, I think the right thing to do might be to migrate this question to ELL and ask an ELL moderator to merge the two. I've left a flag to this effect; in the meantime, I voted to close to keep two copies of the question from being in play at the same time.
Aug
5
comment Use of “well” to signal a pseudo-awkward pause before an impending word repetition or pun
I'm reluctant to characterize well this way when it's (1) clearly done on purpose and (2) in print rather than speech.
Jul
30
reviewed Leave Open Are both of these Raising’s?
Jul
23
comment How can I ask about a confirmation?
@RegDwigнt People really do pronounce it that way. (Less often than they used to, though…?) Yahoo!'s cafeteria is still called URL's Cafe.
Jul
23
comment Should I use the subjunctive mood in these sentence?
I wouldn't link to that ELL answer as an explanation…
Jul
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
14
comment Why is this sentence incorrect?
This question is obviously not general reference. It's also wrong to close this as off-topic claiming that the book is incorrect. The OP invented these sentences! They never said the book claimed they were correct. This claim was introduced by medica's edit, which was unfortunately in error and appears to have led to the closure of the question.
Jul
14
comment Why is this sentence incorrect?
The OP invented these examples. The reason you mistakenly believed the textbook said they were correct, and the reason you declared the textbook terrible, was medica's edit, which was in error.
Jul
11
comment English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日) — “sunshine filtering through leaves”
This is essentially the dictionary definition. For reference, here are similar definitions from seven Japanese-English dictionaries: "(a ray of) sunshine filtering through the branches of trees" (研究社新和英大辞典) "sunshine filtering through the leaves (of trees) (ジーニアス和英辞典) "rays of sunlight filtering down through the trees overhead" (オーレックス和英辞典) "sunbeams [the sun] streaming through the leaves of trees" (プログレッシブ和英中辞典) "sunlight filtering [sifting] down through the trees" (研究社新和英中辞典) "dappled sunlight; sunlight filtering through the trees" (ウィズダム和英辞典) "sunlight filtering through trees" (JMDICT)
Jul
11
comment single word for one who eats the same food all the time
It seems like a fine enough answer to me. But either way, I suppose this is what you get when you put arbitrary restraints on expression (like "I want to express it with a single word!").
Jul
9
comment Is “attempt” a durative or a punctual verb?
@FumbleFingers On the contrary, many linguists consider the stative/dynamic, punctual/durative, and atelic/telic contrasts rather important to the analysis of English. Quirk et al. (1985) and Huddleston & Pullum (2002) both felt lexical aspect was a major enough factor to cover in detail. It has practical importance, too―many common errors made by learners are due to unawareness of aspect.