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/ˈsneɪlboʊt/


11h
comment Why is “did” italicized for emphasis in “Where did you come from?”
This is what Huddleston calls "emphatic polarity" in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (page 98). There should be a contrast, implicit or explicit: "[Well, if you didn't come from the store, then] where did you come from?" The exact interpretation would depend on context you haven't provided.
Oct
19
comment The meaning of “yet” in “Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears had left the flushing in her galled eyes”
This is sense 3c of yet in the OED: "With ere, before, etc. indicating the ultimate occurrence of something after an interval of time: before ere, etc., nearly = ‘already’; after ere, etc., nearly = ‘at length’ (cf. 5 a). Now only in ere yet (arch.)."
Oct
17
revised What is a wheenydom?
Replace pre with blockquote; put question in question body
Oct
16
awarded  Yearling
Oct
16
revised Is it necessary sometimes to use past tense in formal writing to mean present
added 4 characters in body
Oct
16
comment How on Earth can we say 'a' moon?
@CarSmack That looks like locative there rather than existential there. Pay attention to the pronunciation: in existential there, the vowel is reduced to schwa.
Oct
15
comment How on Earth can we say 'a' moon?
@oerkelens There are lots of ways you can figuratively divide the referents of nouns up into conceptual categories, from which you can select and introduce a particular example as new information, in particular, across attributes (a blue moon, a pale sky) and across time (a young Rembrandt, an old Rembrandt).
Oct
14
comment How on Earth can we say 'a' moon?
@CarSmack Actually, Ward & Birner 1995 is also relevant here, since you're asking about existentials like "There's a fly in my soup" and "There's a moon in the sky tonight".
Oct
14
comment How on Earth can we say 'a' moon?
You might start by reading Birner & Ward 1994.
Oct
14
revised Is “Don't you know? ” the same as “Do not you know?”?
added 586 characters in body
Oct
14
revised Is “Don't you know? ” the same as “Do not you know?”?
added 71 characters in body
Oct
14
answered Is “Don't you know? ” the same as “Do not you know?”?
Oct
14
comment Why does 'with' mean 'against' and not 'alongside' in phrases of opposition?
@ADTC I incorporated my comment into the answer now that it's been migrated.
Oct
14
revised Why does 'with' mean 'against' and not 'alongside' in phrases of opposition?
added 545 characters in body
Oct
14
awarded  Disciplined
Oct
13
comment How did 7 come to be an abbreviation for 'and' in Old English?
@davecw Writing 7's is okay. See The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p.1586: "Plurals with 's: An apostrophe may be used to separate the plural suffix from the base with letters, numbers (notably dates), symbols, abbreviations, and words used metalinguistically: (i) p's and q's, 1960's, &'s, Ph.D.'s, if's and but's (ii) She got four A's and two B's. This practice is less common than it used to be; with dates and abbreviations ending in an upper case letter, the form without the apostrophe is now more usual: in the 1960s, two candidates with Ph.D.s."
Oct
13
reviewed Reject suggested edit on How did 7 come to be an abbreviation for 'and' in Old English?
Oct
13
comment The grammar of 'clothes' versus 'clothing'
Although it's not relevant in the case of clothes, some of the words you list do have forms that are either singular or unmarked for number (depending on your analysis) which appear attributively: scissor kick, trouser leg, etc. Unfortunately, all of my references on this subject are too brief: Quirk et al. 1985, p.1333, Huddleston & Pullum 2002 p.342, Biber et al. 1999 p.289 and 595.
Oct
13
comment Other ways to say “I'm rooting for you?”
I am honestly surprised this question is open, given ELU's standards.
Oct
11
comment Compound words limitation
Please don't crosspost between ELL and ELU, especially without telling anyone you're doing so. ell.stackexchange.com/questions/35163/compound-words-in-english