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/ˈsneɪlboʊt/


Nov
22
comment Is “Helper Verb” Old School?
"Helper verb" is still taught in primary schools.
Nov
22
comment How to categorize this phrase. Relative clause, Interrogative clause, Adverbial clause?
@Araucaria I'm familiar with the argument that to is a defective auxiliary, but as far as I can see, to doesn't seem to fit syntactically with the class of modal auxiliaries. Is there another argument I'm unfamiliar with? (Can you provide a reference for me?)
Nov
18
comment Is this sentence grammatically correct? “Isn't it only you who have that book?”
Cross-posted to ELL: ell.stackexchange.com/questions/38956/…
Nov
8
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
27
comment “Ten and several minutes”: Any more natural expression?
@PeterShor See this answer on Japanese.SE by Tsuyoshi Ito, where 十数 is presumably the Japanese in question. He wrote: "数 in 十数 means that it is an unspecified number. That is, 十数 is 1X, where X is an unspecified digit. It is usually assumed that X is at least two and not too large; 19 would be probably too large to refer to as 十数."
Oct
24
awarded  Pundit
Oct
23
comment Why is “did” italicized for emphasis in “Where did you come from?”
This is what Huddleston calls "emphatic polarity" in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (page 98). There should be a contrast, implicit or explicit: "[Well, if you didn't come from the store, then] where did you come from?" The exact interpretation would depend on context you haven't provided.
Oct
19
comment The meaning of “yet” in “Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears had left the flushing in her galled eyes”
This is sense 3c of yet in the OED: "With ere, before, etc. indicating the ultimate occurrence of something after an interval of time: before ere, etc., nearly = ‘already’; after ere, etc., nearly = ‘at length’ (cf. 5 a). Now only in ere yet (arch.)."
Oct
17
revised What is a wheenydom?
Replace pre with blockquote; put question in question body
Oct
16
awarded  Yearling
Oct
16
revised Is it necessary sometimes to use past tense in formal writing to mean present
added 4 characters in body
Oct
16
comment How on Earth can we say 'a' moon?
@CarSmack That looks like locative there rather than existential there. Pay attention to the pronunciation: in existential there, the vowel is reduced to schwa.
Oct
15
comment How on Earth can we say 'a' moon?
@oerkelens There are lots of ways you can figuratively divide the referents of nouns up into conceptual categories, from which you can select and introduce a particular example as new information, in particular, across attributes (a blue moon, a pale sky) and across time (a young Rembrandt, an old Rembrandt).
Oct
14
comment How on Earth can we say 'a' moon?
@CarSmack Actually, Ward & Birner 1995 is also relevant here, since you're asking about existentials like "There's a fly in my soup" and "There's a moon in the sky tonight".
Oct
14
comment How on Earth can we say 'a' moon?
You might start by reading Birner & Ward 1994.
Oct
14
revised Is “Don't you know? ” the same as “Do not you know?”?
added 586 characters in body
Oct
14
revised Is “Don't you know? ” the same as “Do not you know?”?
added 71 characters in body
Oct
14
answered Is “Don't you know? ” the same as “Do not you know?”?
Oct
14
comment Why does 'with' mean 'against' and not 'alongside' in phrases of opposition?
@ADTC I incorporated my comment into the answer now that it's been migrated.
Oct
14
revised Why does 'with' mean 'against' and not 'alongside' in phrases of opposition?
added 545 characters in body