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May
20
comment Is “cause” instead of “because” becoming Standard English?
The Standard English Dictionary? Is that figurative?
May
19
comment How do you write the expression of disgust that sounds like “er”?
American speakers would be rather confused by a spelling with 'R', as the large majority of us are rhotic speakers.
May
19
comment Is using “wish” like this exclusive to India?
I don't see why this question has a close vote. I think monotransitive wish is a well known feature of Indian English. It's described in Indian and British English: A Handbook of Usage and Pronunciation (2004, p.197) and Contemporary Indian English: Variation and Change (2009, p.106), for example. It's not a feature of AmE or BrE (for example), and an answer can plainly say so and answer the rest of the OP's questions.
May
17
comment What does “well you” after a comma mean?
@FumbleFingers It didn't seem like a riddle to me. The meaning was clear. (It doesn't really matter to me whether you close it or not. It's your site, not mine. But the meaning was apparent, so I left a comment.)
May
17
comment What does “well you” after a comma mean?
It doesn't look like non-native English to me. It looks like each well is a filler word. "Your body size doesn't make you you!" It's probably hard to tell because of how the commas were used (or not used).
May
16
comment mail address - construction of
I think people write addresses the way they see other people write them. I don't think many people ever stop to consider the logic behind it, if any.
May
16
revised What is the best word (or term) to identify pronouncing W's for L's and R's?
added 714 characters in body
May
16
awarded  Good Question
May
16
comment Is there a word to (best) describe someone who sees and remembers every single thing?
@Oldbag Then it's strange none of them will ever demonstrate their ability scientifically or choose to win money by entering the World Memory Championships, which is consistently dominated by mnemonists. I guess they must need to keep their existence a secret! ;-)
May
16
comment Is there a word to (best) describe someone who sees and remembers every single thing?
Such people don't exist, so there isn't really a need for a psychology term, but they're pretty common in fiction.
May
16
accepted Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?
May
16
awarded  Curious
May
16
awarded  Popular Question
May
15
awarded  Nice Question
May
15
asked Is a hamburger considered a sandwich?
May
14
awarded  Good Answer
May
13
comment Pronunciation of “I'm going to” - Part 2
There's no such thing as "accent-free". Anyway, this sort of pronunciation is common around Chicago (where I grew up).
May
13
answered What is the best word (or term) to identify pronouncing W's for L's and R's?
May
13
comment Pluralization and nouns
It would be better to close this as a duplicate of a question with an accurate answer.
May
13
comment Pronunciation of “I'm going to”
Yeah, I see no reason to doubt the OP's ears.