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/ˈsneɪlboʊt/


1d
revised allow for vs. note
deleted 39 characters in body
1d
comment What is the opposite of 'subjunctive'?
Not all grammatical features have well-defined opposites.
Sep
14
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
14
comment Why did the author write “it were” in the sentence ending “as if it were being magnetically repelled”?
@tchrist Sure, if you prefer, you can call them real and unreal. That's what Swan does in his pedagogical grammar for L2 speakers.
Sep
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
14
comment Why did the author write “it were” in the sentence ending “as if it were being magnetically repelled”?
@Lia Was and were show a realis-irrealis contrast. I'm sorry if I was rude because the rudeness actually happened, but as if it were being magnetically repelled because that's not what actually happened. But this contrast is eroding: was can be used in an irrealis sense as well, outside of a few fixed constructions where were is required (Were I to but not *Was I to) and a couple constructions where were is especially common (If I were you is more common than expected relative to the informal If I was you). In formal English, I suggest always observing the contrast.
Sep
14
answered What's the equivalent to “typo” in handwritten texts?
Sep
14
comment What part of speech is “there” when used in “There is (blah blah)”?
Existential there is considered a pronoun in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (p.427).
Sep
9
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
4
comment I hardly/highly doubt it
@mplungjan The chart from Google Books Ngram Viewer wouldn't tell us anything in this case. You'd have to read through the context of each example to determine whether the phrase is intended with the standard meaning or the way the OP suggests. If you can find a fair number of examples that fit the OP's usage, it would be interesting to see! If you did, then the next question would be whether to consider them a type of error.
Sep
3
comment Portuguese native speaker
What's your take on "British English", then?
Aug
29
comment Where an ellipsis exists, is there a term for the missing text?
@DanBron Many linguists distinguish between elide and ellipt, reserving the former for the omission of a sound or sounds and the latter for the omission of a word or words. In that sense, ellipted works but elided would be inappropriate.
Aug
21
comment “Somewhere” - is it really a pronoun?
Although it is not usually classified as a pronoun, some dictionaries do give this classification, so it's a fair thing to ask about. For example, the Oxford Dictionary of English (not the OED!) lists it under both adverb and pronoun. In A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, it is listed as a compound adverb (p.438). In the non-traditional analysis of The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, it is instead classified as something they call a "compound determinative"; see p.423 for details.
Aug
20
comment Omitting the “I” from “I am” the second clause in a sentence?
I don't think the comma is actually necessary (or perhaps even desirable) but it's certainly possible to add it.
Aug
19
comment Antonym (or dual) for 'anachronism'
You could say the opposite of anachronism was catachronism if you wanted, but it seems that very few people want.
Aug
19
comment Why don't we use an apostrophe to denote ownership on 'it'?
But if you separate category from function as CGEL does, you can say that its is a possessive pronoun with determiner function.
Aug
19
comment Meaning - 'of us'
If this were written today, the comma before which would almost certainly not be there.
Aug
19
comment Subject-Verb Agreement - was/were
Jason Smith, conjoined subjects typically take plural agreement. This is no exception and were is the better choice, but consider sentences like "drinking and driving is a dangerous combination" or "peanut butter and jelly is my favorite flavor". Unfortunately there is no simple and general answer. @GeorgePompidou The subject is the noun phrase a bag of carrots and half a tomato. I'm sure the OP can count; please Be Nice.
Aug
19
comment Is this phrase “2- or 4-person” correct?
Look up suspended hyphens.
Aug
18
comment “Her whole family IS/ARE biologists”?
@AppFzx Many libraries, especially school libraries, have a copy of CGEL in the reference section. I'd suggest you check the library before buying a copy :-)