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/ˈsneɪlboʊt/


2d
comment How can I ask about a confirmation?
@RegDwigнt People really do pronounce it that way. (Less often than they used to, though…?) Yahoo!'s cafeteria is still called URL's Cafe.
2d
comment Should I use the subjunctive mood in these sentence?
I wouldn't link to that ELL answer as an explanation…
Jul
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
14
comment Why is this sentence incorrect?
This question is obviously not general reference. It's also wrong to close this as off-topic claiming that the book is incorrect. The OP invented these sentences! They never said the book claimed they were correct. This claim was introduced by medica's edit, which was unfortunately in error and appears to have led to the closure of the question.
Jul
14
comment Why is this sentence incorrect?
The OP invented these examples. The reason you mistakenly believed the textbook said they were correct, and the reason you declared the textbook terrible, was medica's edit, which was in error.
Jul
11
comment English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日) — “sunshine filtering through leaves”
This is essentially the dictionary definition. For reference, here are similar definitions from seven Japanese-English dictionaries: "(a ray of) sunshine filtering through the branches of trees" (研究社新和英大辞典) "sunshine filtering through the leaves (of trees) (ジーニアス和英辞典) "rays of sunlight filtering down through the trees overhead" (オーレックス和英辞典) "sunbeams [the sun] streaming through the leaves of trees" (プログレッシブ和英中辞典) "sunlight filtering [sifting] down through the trees" (研究社新和英中辞典) "dappled sunlight; sunlight filtering through the trees" (ウィズダム和英辞典) "sunlight filtering through trees" (JMDICT)
Jul
11
comment single word for one who eats the same food all the time
It seems like a fine enough answer to me. But either way, I suppose this is what you get when you put arbitrary restraints on expression (like "I want to express it with a single word!").
Jul
9
comment Is “attempt” a durative or a punctual verb?
@FumbleFingers On the contrary, many linguists consider the stative/dynamic, punctual/durative, and atelic/telic contrasts rather important to the analysis of English. Quirk et al. (1985) and Huddleston & Pullum (2002) both felt lexical aspect was a major enough factor to cover in detail. It has practical importance, too―many common errors made by learners are due to unawareness of aspect.
Jul
8
comment Comparative and Superlative for little?
Littler and littlest are certainly far less common than you'd expect given how frequent little is, though I wouldn't go so far as to call them grammatically incorrect. Smaller and smallest are good substitutes in this sense.
Jul
4
reviewed Close Phrase Request for the beyond or something hidden
Jul
4
comment Should I use the word “tomorning”?
But people may not understand if you do.
Jun
22
revised What's a word or phrase to describe a good book that I cannot put down when starting reading?
rolled back to a previous revision
Jun
16
awarded  Caucus
Jun
16
awarded  Constituent
Jun
16
reviewed Leave Open Use of “nay” - still current?
Jun
13
comment English does not have a future tense--what do you think?
Recommended reading: What's will? by Mark Liberman at Language Log.
May
30
comment the and thee (I prefer to pronounce it as thuh all the time)
There's some discussion here with recordings: englishspeechservices.com/blog/…
May
30
comment the and thee (I prefer to pronounce it as thuh all the time)
If you do, make sure you insert a glottal consonant between the vowel sounds.
May
27
comment what's the meaning of “likely unconstitutional”?
This is headlinese. Words have been left out. It's something like this: The NSA phone program is likely to be unconstitutional, a federal judge rules
May
27
reviewed Leave Open An expression to define that “very little span of time”