4,339 reputation
12142
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 13 hours ago

/ˈsneɪlboʊt/


Feb
27
revised “Recommend you to [do something]” or “Recommend to you to [do something]”?
edited title
Feb
25
comment His voice is so monotone that it lulls me to sleep every time I hear it
Good question! But there are no relative clauses here.
Feb
24
comment Why “themselves” instead of “himself” when referring to third-person singular?
I think the deploring is actually relatively recent. In any case, singular they is often the only natural choice. Avoiding it is clumsy.
Feb
23
awarded  Generalist
Feb
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
17
comment A word that has the same meaning as its negation
On chat, RegDwigнt suggested (un)ravel. That might be a better example, since the in- in inflammable is not a negator. (It doesn't seem that any of the examples on the auto-antonym list answer this question, so I don't believe it should be a duplicate.)
Feb
17
answered How is “deque” commonly pronounced?
Feb
8
comment How did 'sluice' evolve to have 2 distinct meanings?
In linguistics, sluicing has yet another meaning.
Feb
8
comment A battery of tests is/are
@JanusBahsJacquet Google won't report any n-grams that appear fewer than 40 times in a given corpus (source). It seems that these are relatively low-frequency searches to begin with, so they may be "disappearing" because they're falling under the thresholds in individual corpora.
Feb
7
comment Adjective describing a project/goal that is not easy to collaborate on
Wouldn't it be better to say something like "it wasn't easy to do so" or "it didn't work very well"? (I'm not trying to propose these exact wordings―I just don't understand the motivation for asking for a single-word adjective here.)
Feb
6
comment “He is a genius, he is.” Is there a term for the “he is” addition to this sentence?
Note that this is Huddleston & Pullum's 2002 Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, not Quirk et al's 1985 Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language. Unfortunately, they share the acronym CGEL.
Dec
23
awarded  Electorate
Dec
23
comment Comma or period after break from quotation?
That example doesn't appear to answer the OP's question.
Dec
23
revised Why is the action of removing a digital file named “Delete”?
deleted 1 character in body
Dec
23
comment Comma or period after break from quotation?
Which General Reference should the OP consult?
Dec
21
reviewed Close Word order: “Tell me what is your opinion on this matter” or “Tell me what your opinion on this matter is”
Dec
20
comment Is there some institute that can create a word which would mean 'he or she', or indeed any other word?
Besides singular they, we also use singular you.
Dec
19
reviewed Reject what is meant by “holy cows” phrases?
Dec
17
comment Split infinitives—did Old English have them?
It's a comment, not an answer. Since to is a separate word and not part of an infinitive verb form, it doesn't make sense to call these "split infinitives". But if my comments need to be answers, then I'll just point out that "split infinitives" arose in Middle English, not Old English.
Dec
16
comment What word describes languages that are written left-to-right, top-to-bottom?
Usually romanization refers to the transcription of spoken language into the Roman alphabet rather than transliteration of another writing system, although both are possible. For example, Hepburn romanization is based on sound rather than reproducing kana spelling.