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2h
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
I'm not sure the Bach sentence is grammatical (it sounds marginal to me at best), but the dog sentence is a good example.
2h
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
The example on your profile (**Ago December it snowed forty four inches in Buffalo.) is ungrammatical in the extreme. This has nothing to do with prescriptivism.
2d
reviewed Leave Open Does the word “buttress,” which is both a noun & verb, follow the rules about where to put emphasis based on its part of speech?
2d
reviewed Close Use of 'a pair': Which of the following two sentences is correct?
Apr
24
comment Is “more easy” correct is some dialects?
@PhiLho Ah, my apologies. COCA is the Corpus of Contemporary American English and BNC is the British National Corpus.
Apr
23
comment Is “more easy” correct is some dialects?
For what it's worth, COCA has 26180 results for easier and 93 for more easy (a few of which are false positives). BNC has 5711 and 36 results. So it seems that in both AmE and BrE easier is orders of magnitude more common.
Apr
23
answered I wonder whether the past tense is interchanged with the present tense
Apr
23
comment 'Anastrophe' a hyponym of 'hyperbaton'?
That's not the OED, by the way. That's the ODE, a completely different dictionary.
Apr
10
comment “Nor did I” or “Neither did I”
It doesn't seem like an particularly good English test.
Apr
6
comment Is there any English word in which “ph” is not pronounced as “f”?
Your rule should probably mention morpheme boundaries.
Apr
5
comment Is “their futures” acceptable?
The question title doesn't appear to be related to the question body.
Apr
5
comment Is “He is risen” Correct?
@Anonym But the last one has been reanalyzed as an adjectival form. She is gone is fine, but not *She is gone to the store. When it's used as a verb, it appears in construction with the modern perfect auxiliary have instead: She has gone to the store. The perfect auxiliary be is well and truly dead in English.
Feb
27
revised “Recommend you to [do something]” or “Recommend to you to [do something]”?
edited title
Feb
25
comment His voice is so monotone that it lulls me to sleep every time I hear it
Good question! But there are no relative clauses here.
Feb
24
comment Why “themselves” instead of “himself” when referring to third-person singular?
I think the deploring is actually relatively recent. In any case, singular they is often the only natural choice. Avoiding it is clumsy.
Feb
23
awarded  Generalist
Feb
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
17
comment A word that has the same meaning as its negation
On chat, RegDwigнt suggested (un)ravel. That might be a better example, since the in- in inflammable is not a negator. (It doesn't seem that any of the examples on the auto-antonym list answer this question, so I don't believe it should be a duplicate.)
Feb
17
answered How is “deque” commonly pronounced?
Feb
8
comment How did 'sluice' evolve to have 2 distinct meanings?
In linguistics, sluicing has yet another meaning.