343 reputation
212
bio website
location
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Jan 24 at 3:52

the cows are here to take me home now...


Feb
3
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
9
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
20
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
7
comment Is 'Jap' still considered an ethnic slur?
@coleopterist Maybe what would end this once and for all is if people can just agree that all abbreviations are just abbreviations: perhaps impolite, but never offensive. There's no reason that something as benign and common as abbreviation should be such a landmine.
Nov
7
answered Does “gay” still include the meaning “merry”?
Nov
7
comment Is 'Jap' still considered an ethnic slur?
@coleopterist Yep, that's exactly right. "Nihon" and "Nippon" are equally correct, but younger people especially don't seem to use "Nippon" as much -- partially for phonetic reasons, but also just because it's come to be associated with old people. It also sounds more official, so it tends to be used by news anchors and corporations and such. "Nip" isn't recognized as anything other than a wartime racial slur, as it isn't even phonetically comfortable. The other one that went out of usage immediately after the war is "Dai Nippon Teikoku" (Great Empire of Japan) -- for obvious reasons.
Nov
7
awarded  Teacher
Nov
7
revised Is 'Jap' still considered an ethnic slur?
added 21 characters in body
Nov
7
answered Is 'Jap' still considered an ethnic slur?
Nov
7
comment Is 'Jap' still considered an ethnic slur?
@coleopterist The Japanese government is quite schizophrenic -- opinions on various issues differ even within each party. Many Japanese politicians would probably take no offense to the term.
Oct
23
comment Is “Thank god”, as opposed to “Thank God”, acceptable?
There is no religious context; if anything, it's a cultural context. It's an English figure of speech, and like it or not, English is a language born in and predominantly used in countries with Christian roots. Preferring secular language as a general principle is one thing; insisting that there is "no excuse" for writers to use words with religious etymology borders on persecution. I don't care how right we as agnostic/atheists we may be about the nature of reality; intolerance helps no one. And again, I'm agnostic, and I use the phrase casually all the time. I have no ulterior motives.
Oct
22
comment Is “Thank god”, as opposed to “Thank God”, acceptable?
Also, frankly, I'm really not interested in religious discussion here -- just the use of a phrase with a religious connotations.
Oct
22
comment Is “Thank god”, as opposed to “Thank God”, acceptable?
-1 for turning this into a YouTube comment section. There's a difference between striving to use secular language and being insulted by a figure of speech. As an agnostic, "thank God" doesn't insult me at all. If a doctor saves your life and you literally "thank God" without thanking your doctor (most Christians in most countries are sensible enough to thank their doctors as well for saving their lives), then sure, arguably the doctor could be justified in being annoyed, but to call the phrase "thank God" an insult to one's intelligence is excessively combative.
Oct
22
awarded  Critic
Jul
27
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
27
comment Rules for removing last vowel when adding “-able”?
Thanks for the very clear answer. And yeah, I was tempted to ask about "-ible" too, but I figured I'd stick with just one for now, since there would probably be a completely different reason for "-ible".
Jul
27
accepted Rules for removing last vowel when adding “-able”?
Jul
27
revised Rules for removing last vowel when adding “-able”?
deleted 112 characters in body
Jul
27
comment Rules for removing last vowel when adding “-able”?
@jwpat7 Thanks, didn't see that when I searched the site earlier.
Jul
27
comment Rules for removing last vowel when adding “-able”?
@Pantalones English is my native tongue, actually. I didn't intend to ridicule the language in contrast to any other language, but you're right, I can see why it could seem that way coming someone whose name doesn't suggest that they're natively anglophone. Thanks, I'll change it.