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seen Dec 15 '12 at 5:44

Sep
25
awarded  Famous Question
Feb
24
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
9
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
12
comment What is the difference between the nouns start and beginning?
For a race perhaps, I would say "from start to finish" but for a period, "from beginning to end."
Nov
26
answered What does “wherein” mean exactly?
Nov
4
comment “Emigrant” vs. “immigrant”
The excerpt from Wikipedia is fine for an encyclopedia article, and it does help give context for how the word is often used, but at the same time it is way too much to read into the definition of the word. Not that this example is inconsistent in any way, but in general I prefer to avoid using an obviously foreign word in English prose in a manner inconsistent with its meaning in its original language. In this case I'm content to go with common usage, consistency with its original denotation, and not reading too much into the word by itself. Connotation is flexible, denotation less so.
Nov
4
comment “Emigrant” vs. “immigrant”
No, there is a distinction between the past participle émigré and "emigrant" which is actually the present participle émigrant. The present participle suggests an ongoing process, which would ordinarily be assimilation into the culture and ways of a new country, and when this process is completed, one would not be considering oneself an émigré from the point of view of the old country. But applying the past participle to one who has emigrated --- qui a émigré in French --- would seem to connote some degree of passivity and disaffectedness, but I am not sure.
Nov
4
accepted Can the noun “sheen” denote the simple outward appearance of something?
Nov
4
awarded  Commentator
Nov
4
comment Can the noun “sheen” denote the simple outward appearance of something?
I don't doubt that the word will be understood and is used in this sense. I'm trying to flesh out exactly when this word could or could not be used, because it is rather rare and restricted to certain situations in English, and although I immediately recognized the same sense of the Swedish cognate sken, this particular usage seems much more common and unrestricted in that language than it ever would be in English.
Nov
3
comment Can the noun “sheen” denote the simple outward appearance of something?
@MετάEd not necessarily "sheen of legitimacy" -- could be "sheen of righteousness" -- or anything similar that is or would be seen in an unduly positive light.
Nov
3
comment “Emigrant” vs. “immigrant”
Émigré is one who has emigrated, presumably from a French-speaking country.
Nov
3
comment “Emigrant” vs. “immigrant”
Emigrant is one leaving, and immigrant is one coming.
Nov
3
asked Can the noun “sheen” denote the simple outward appearance of something?
Oct
30
answered Is the account balance “less” or “smaller” when we compare two amounts?
Oct
28
answered “Not once he would” vs. “not once would he”
Oct
20
awarded  Teacher
Oct
20
answered Has elision revised the standard spelling of any words in the past century?
Oct
20
answered Hypernym for “Denial”?
Oct
17
comment “Fall”, “fell”, “felled”
Only loggers fall trees, though. Storms fell trees.