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Dec
19
comment Vulgar way of saying “he killed himself”
@Cameron I think it's the kind of thing I was looking for. I read that it can also mean a non-fatal accident, but the context of death will be explicit, so I think it really fits. It's short and offensive enough. If you could make your comment an answer I would choose it but unfortunately the question is closed now. By no means I wanted to provoke discussion, I just wanted to get a short answer. I regret I haven't provided enough details at the beginning, but maybe I'm not experienced enough in asking questions here.
Dec
18
comment Vulgar way of saying “he killed himself”
It does not have to exclude stupidity, but should not imply it.
Dec
18
comment Vulgar way of saying “he killed himself”
@Mr Lister but this interpretation (death) is possible? In the cartoon the person making the remark will be looking at the dead body, so the context will be rather clear.
Dec
18
comment Vulgar way of saying “he killed himself”
@Robusto It can also mean what you say, but my interpretation is also possible. I added NSFW in the title, but coleopterist removed. Maybe it should be added again?
Dec
18
comment Vulgar way of saying “he killed himself”
Thank you very much for the answer. I included edit in the question. The expression should not imply person's fault or stupidity.
Dec
18
comment Vulgar way of saying “he killed himself”
Thank you very much for the answer. I included edit in the question. The expression should not imply person's fault or stupidity.
Dec
18
comment Vulgar way of saying “he killed himself”
I mean misadventure, like falling out of balcony. So you cannot use "he killed himself" for this situations?
Nov
15
comment Support hypothesis with use of neither
So you think my original proposal is not valid?
Nov
15
comment Support hypothesis with use of neither
This would be nice for "Bible of Signal Processing" :) I hope there's something in between your two proposals.
Nov
15
comment Support hypothesis with use of neither
I think it's ok, but I find "because" a bit too informal for this case.
Oct
14
comment “Listen to music” vs. “listen to the music”
@StoneyB It might be it, thanks for the explanation. I think I heard this theory on English lesson or course but I can't be sure because it was a long time ago so I didn't want to include it.
Oct
14
comment “Listen to music” vs. “listen to the music”
Why was the question downvoted? Could it be done better? I tried to Google this expression and look in dictionaries but I haven't found anything except for, yes, Doobie Brothers song. Assume what I heard was true, what would be the way to learn about it?
Oct
14
comment “Listen to music” vs. “listen to the music”
@RegDwigh—ā I also found it very strange, but I had to be sure.