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seen Nov 25 '12 at 3:48

Nov
25
comment What is a good synonym for “attribute”?
Traits are innate--see how it is that it has no verb form? Attributes are what we attribute (verb) and can be innate or not.
Nov
25
comment Why do we say “was supposed to” for “should have”?
Although that one was overwrought for the purpose, the pertinent part is in agreement with my insightful explanation, and not with...what is it you are trying to say? I will need to work up a new post to have space to explain in hopefully sufficient detail...a little later, as it was supposed earlier today that I would - i.e., I was supposed to - later on take someone out for supper. Please stand by.
Nov
25
comment What's the opposite word for “sin”?
Some hand holding: the word is faultlessly. Seems to be sinful not to take heed and avoid topics prone to hysteria. Thanks for the validation points
Nov
23
comment “Expected of” vs. “expected from”
Yes, rhetoric is, indeed, the only thing that needs rule. Expected of implies a movement of after-the-fact anticipation in the direction from the subject to the object of expectation Expected from implies movement from the object to the subject of expectation. I expect of you will have done as anticipated you should. I expect from you that the payment you promised will arrive in my hand from yours. Expected of operates as an abstract expression; expected from as a concrete expression.
Nov
23
comment What does “subset” mean as a verb?
That was...; not this is.... Sorry, I did't mean to get anyone all theatrical. Thanks for the point.
Nov
23
comment Is there any expression that is the opposite of “slippery slope”?
Nor where any others but why so dour that a precise coinage fits better than slippingly talking around a question. I am reminded: Gooogewhack in Googlewhack out. It was such when I arrived and will remain when I go. Thanks for the down votes.
Nov
22
comment What's the opposite word for “sin”?
...not quite but close, I would think. The nouns, Virtue and vice, seem more the opposites. Virtue as well as vice can manifest as a sin or as sinning, which is not so simplistic a word or concept as some would have us believe. Also sin is closely connected with belief, as in an independent guiding principle that ought to lead one away from error. Belief is not a necessary component of all virtues. Just an idea to think about; not trying to sin you out.
Nov
21
comment Is there an adverb for “simplified”?
Seems to me the question was seeking greater impact by greater - more punctilious - exactness. It's as if the adverb coinage choice was meant to transcend simplified's merely basic, rough, or effective meanings. Maybe.
Nov
18
comment Adjective for “terrified yet calm and capable”
Unflappable misses the mark. I don't think the injured or the injurers are bent on disrupting the EMT's composure, such as by making wise cracks or hurling personal invectives--albeit that people in agitated coma can get mighty rowdy with the tongue--however, comatose individuals generally don't inspire much in the way of commiserative feelings to begin with.
Nov
18
comment Adjective for “terrified yet calm and capable”
Sorry, but there is authority behind those examples. This has nothing to do... is syntactically incorrect: ...those have nothing to do... is correct, unless your are saying that your comment has nothing to do.... The OP question did not ask for terrified's definition. It asked for suggestions for expressing calm in the grips of fear and sympathy.
Nov
18
comment Why is “definitely” so frequently typoed?
never mind, thanks for the edit. disregard any flag that did not fail to upload.
Nov
18
comment Why is “definitely” so frequently typoed?
the original post along with much of its meaning has been obliterated...to that a discussion on meta has been foreclosed to all practical purposes. Please return the original answer for me to copy, and publish for discussion on meta. Then once I have recovered my essay, if you like, I will request deletion of my entire answer.
Nov
18
comment Why is “definitely” so frequently typoed?
The edits and commentary are too unfocused for a practical reply addressing the proofs and points made, and what seems an inappopriate, non constructive tone taken. So, no offense intended--it is the only recourse provided--I am compelled to return an unconstructive flag. I will look for a way, for you and other's edification, to make responses and suggestons related to fine art of proofing/editing on meta. If it doesn't appear soon, its just that time comes at a premium for me. Understanding is appreciated.
Nov
18
comment -ship vs. -hood
testing server.
Nov
18
comment “Give your best” vs. “give of your best”
In the latter usage, of and from are synonymous: to give of one's best is to give from one's best. Give one's best tend more to connote quantitativeness, whether literally or figuratively. Giving of one's best tends to take more of a qualitative connotation. It is certainly true that
Nov
17
comment Why is “definitely” so frequently typoed?
An ENT doc would probably find it interesting to compare such a misspelling distribution as in the OP, with a similar distribution of nasal and otic syndromes amoung an English speaking population sample
Oct
28
comment Is it poor style to use adverbs ending in “ly” in formal writing?
I think the concept your suggestion seems to miss is the one called "standards and practices" that guides all publishing. To write as if speaking conversationally (to the level of readers) as opposed to grammatically is a development long in the rhetorical making. And, for what it is worth, with quite obvious success.
Oct
21
comment “Had better” — what is the meaning of this grammatically?
PS I only found this Q & A because I was searching for something related, and yet unrelated (perhaps an idiom, perhaps not, I will let you know....)
Oct
21
comment “Had better” — what is the meaning of this grammatically?
...other than that original questioner, or someone trusted, (watch this)...had best...go back and remove the initial tags and, then, supersede them with the tag, idiom.
Oct
21
comment “Had better” — what is the meaning of this grammatically?
The question is a good one to demostrate what an idiomatic expresssion is (a concept that sometimes seems to run far afield on this site and elsewere). "Had better"...[something] is an idiom (essentally, short-hand, mostly oral or written-dialog means of expressing (in this case) a necessary propostion (in imperative mood); one of those ways of speaking that must be inculcated by rote; and which has no formal grammatical context or precedent...hence, is idomatic (remember that definition)...hence also, nothing more need be said...other than... [next comment]