569 reputation
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location Norway
age 32
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Jun 24 at 7:46
Funny how you'll often get more upvotes for not answering their question, but by answering the question they should've asked... ;)

Jun
22
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Nov
7
comment Antonym of “phobia”
The concept of antonyms assumes there is only two options, Which in reality it's often not (even if humans tend to think that way). For most stuff people has phobias about, you can be indifferent, like it, obsess about it etc. What is the antonym for "red"?
Nov
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
22
comment Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?
In Norwegian "De" is polite second person singular (not really used much anymore, we use the informal "du" usually), while "de" is third person plural. I though the polite form were capitalized in Danish too?
Mar
22
awarded  Editor
Mar
22
revised Objects with no name, like “the Sun”
added 133 characters in body
Mar
22
comment Objects with no name, like “the Sun”
@dave: "Allah" actually is "Al-lah" meaning literally "The god"; thus implicitly the only one, just like "The sun" implies (even if we now know it's jus one of many stars), that's why a Muslim would not say "The Allah", that would be just as silly as saying "the The Beatles"..
Mar
22
answered Objects with no name, like “the Sun”
Mar
22
comment Is there a single term for “nieces and nephews”?
In Norwegian we also have both gendered and a neutral word for cousins: "fetter" for male cousin, "kusine" for female cousin and "søskenbarn" (lit. sibling-children, somewhat illogical I think) for cousins of any gender.
Mar
22
comment Is there a single term for “nieces and nephews”?
In some Norwegian dialects you could use "tantebarn" (lit. aunt-children) if you're female. Logically the male equivalent should be "onkelbarn" (uncle-children) but I've never heard it. (Maybe men don't speak that much about children? I've never had the need for a short word for it anyway)
Mar
22
comment Which term correctly identifies those who enjoy programming/technology: “geek” or “nerd”?
In Norwegian "nerd" is a loan word with two pronunciations: As English: /nørd/ (sometimes spelled "nørd" too) or read as a Norwegian word /nærd/. Some people use the two versions slightly differently one corresponding to English "geek" and the other to English "nerd", but no real consensus on which means which.
Mar
22
comment Which term correctly identifies those who enjoy programming/technology: “geek” or “nerd”?
What's the slang term for those that are not in the overlapping areas, i.e. only intelligent ("smart" I guess), only socially inept, or only obsessed?
Mar
22
comment Do most languages need more space than English?
Compound words even if they're shorter than the English equivalent may "break" the layout if width is restricted and automatic hyphenation is impossible or unreliable (such as on web); which is another reason to reserve extra space in fixed layouts for translations.
Mar
22
comment Do most languages need more space than English?
Point is you have to reserve enough space for a doubling in length when translating a text, and also have to make it look good if the translated text becomes half the length.
Mar
22
comment Do most languages need more space than English?
But you also have some shorter Norwegian ones like: "requirement"="krav".
Mar
21
comment Is there a word or phrase for the feeling you get after looking at a word for too long?
I'd think that for the brain, repeating and intense scrutiny of a word triggers the same responses (probably causes the same stream of repeated stimuli of the same word/phrase, to the language center). Most of our senses work this way, repeated or constant stimuli causes the signal to decrease, if you stare at a fixed point long enough your field of vision starts to fade to gray, and if you sit in a room with a constant noise, it eventually disappears from your conciousness. This is probably true for higher level concepts too.
Mar
21
comment How are “i.e.” and “e.g.” pronounced?
Why do English use Latin abbreviations anyway? In norwegian we use "dvs." as short for "det vil si" ("that is"), and "f.eks." as short for "for eksempel" ("for example"), and we would never pronounce it as an abbrevation (unless you're trying to sound geeky).