430 reputation
310
bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimp
location Australia
age 51
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Jan 23 at 11:56
nothing worth telling

Dec
16
awarded  Scholar
Dec
16
accepted Australian regional shibboleths
Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Nov
7
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Mar
19
answered How do you pronounce “what did you” in “So what did you dream about?” and other similar questions?
Mar
19
comment How do you pronounce “what did you” in “So what did you dream about?” and other similar questions?
A native of where? Not England, I'd guess ;)
Mar
5
answered Meaning of the expression “2.1 kids”
Feb
25
awarded  Student
Feb
25
asked Australian regional shibboleths
Feb
16
comment What are some products that are now words?
Scotch tape is US usage; in UK it would usually be called Sellotape.
Feb
4
comment Is there a difference between “cheers” and “thanks” in colloquial British English?
@IainMH, you have an unusual way of showing respect.
Feb
4
awarded  Critic
Feb
2
answered “Take your ball and go home” - meaning of this odd phrase?
Feb
2
comment Difference between “ability” and “capability”
There are some interesting answers to this question. My understanding of the two words is that "capability" implies having the tools or physical attributes to perform a task while "ability" implies having the skills or training to perform a task. I think this means that my usage coincides with Sarhanis' description and not Alan Hogue's. It also means that you are correct: software has capabilities, not abilities.
Feb
1
comment Is there a difference between “cheers” and “thanks” in colloquial British English?
I think Joost is on the right path: it seems to me to have more to do with geography than demography, common in SE England, less common elsewhere.
Feb
1
comment Is there a difference between “cheers” and “thanks” in colloquial British English?
@Hamid: as an Englishman in Victoria, I have been pulled up for my use of Cheers - it makes me stand out as foreign, apparently :)
Jan
28
comment “Y'all” or “ya'll”?
And in Australia, it's "youse"