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  • 11 votes cast
Feb
1
comment Grammatical structure of the given sentence
Okay, so if they don't have different sources, then now we really need some evidence that they are to be pronounced differently from each other in dialects where the /W/ vs /w/ distinction is maintained. It would be surprising, given that they are of the same origin, if they came to be pronounced differently by such a trifling detail, a change unparalleled in the language.
Feb
1
comment Grammatical structure of the given sentence
Consider that we also use "what" in a similar manner: "what, you think I should keep arguing?"
Feb
1
comment Grammatical structure of the given sentence
Dude, you're the one proposing that they are pronounced differently and that they have different sources. I've seen no proposals elsewhere but here that they have anything but the same source (where's the upstream word, other than "why" that is the source of this interjection?), or that there's any reason to suspect that they are pronounced differently. Given that, the burden of proof is on you to provide evidence of this extraordinary claim.
Jan
31
comment Grammatical structure of the given sentence
They come from the same source and are spelled the same. Some similar examples: "I didn't like it that much", "Whatever" (as a dismissive answer), and all the semantic variants of "yes". Words can have a variety of meanings that can drift a lot over time. Sometimes, it does result in a phonetic split (like "of" vs. "off"). If that's the case, there should be some evidence. Do you really pronounce them differently? Have you measured it with, say, Praat?
Jan
31
comment Phrasal verb “be a thing”
Etymology is certainly incorrect.
Jan
31
comment Grammatical structure of the given sentence
I just don't see any reason why there would be a difference in pronunication in any dialect, given that the words are the same. Can you provide some sources to indicate that there really is such a distinction?
Jan
30
comment Grammatical structure of the given sentence
Uhh, you sure about that pronunciation difference?
Jan
30
awarded  Editor
Jan
30
revised Origin of -(e)s in present indicative third singular
wrong campbell
Jan
26
answered Origin of -(e)s in present indicative third singular
Jan
25
comment Is it possible that the word “suffix” has a Hebrew origin?
Same with "sofa". Latin already has a prefix "sub" and a verb root "fig" and the meaning of those two combined is very clear. You see "sub" prefixes all over the place in Latin. Now you want to propose that it's actually a root meaning "end" (with no explanation for the "fix" part at the end). You also want me to believe that the Romans, with so little contact with the Hebrew-speaking people, borrowed such an inconsequential word to make another inconsequential word. That just doesn't happen. Even Greek, which was spoken among the Roman elite and common people alike, left only a few traces.
Jan
25
comment Is it possible that the word “suffix” has a Hebrew origin?
@McGafter: Latin is just as old as Hebrew. Languages don't spring out of nowhere. In any case, your proposed word connections ignore a great deal. You say the "im" prefix looks like a Hebrew word meaning "with". Except, the Latin prefix is well-documented as meaning not that, and is already explained as coming from either the preposition "in" (for some words) or the negative particle "ne" (for others). This is also born out by other IE languages. How would a Hebrew explanation be better than that?
Jan
22
comment Is it possible that the word “suffix” has a Hebrew origin?
This is not scientifically valid using any method of historical linguistics that we have. You can find chance resemblances between any two languages on the planet, especially if you are as flexible with sound and semantic correspondences as you are being here.
Jan
16
comment Gender in “Sun won't show its/his/her face” nowadays
Note that in Tolkien's world, the sun is a ship steered by a goddess, which probably best explains the use of "her".
Jan
4
comment Is it correct to say peg location instead of peg's location?
You can use either in this case. "Peg's location" would be meaningful. In this context, the two are interchangeable.
Jan
4
comment What's difference between “I am usually doing something” and “I usually do something”?
I disagree with @GEdgar. I can say as well as understand sentences like "on Wednesdays, I'm usually doing something with friends". I can also say "on Wednesdays, I usually do something with friends". The latter seems to indicate that an event (or several) takes place, whereas the former focuses on the fact that the event has a duration and that this keeps me busy.
Dec
21
comment Should a different word be used when “what” is used as an object?
I don't. I also fail to see what that has to do with any of this.
Dec
21
comment Should a different word be used when “what” is used as an object?
Caring about speech doesn't mean adhering to silly, pointless rules. What is improved by moving the preposition to the beginning? What ambiguity is removed? What clarity is added? None. It's irrelevant. For that reason, nobody talks that way anymore.
Dec
21
comment Is the verb “be” needed in each phrase joined with “or” or “and”?
I would say no, but if the clauses that make up the "or" correlation are long, it's helpful to repeat it.
Dec
21
answered Should a different word be used when “what” is used as an object?