621 reputation
36
bio website
location Seattle, WA
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Mar 21 at 5:23

Feb
15
comment Which is better, “on” or “in” + place?
@FumbleFinger: Thanks, I didn't know ELL existed! That makes more sense then.
Feb
15
comment Which is better, “on” or “in” + place?
Okay, is there some better way of welcoming a new user than by downvoting?
Jan
17
comment Is “if you're not familiar with X, it is…” or “if you're not aware, X is…” correct English?
I'd appreciate a comment explaining the downvote so I can learn to give answers more in line with community expectations.
Jan
16
answered Is “if you're not familiar with X, it is…” or “if you're not aware, X is…” correct English?
Jan
16
comment Is it appropriate to say “ I used to be more frightened of spiders that he is now”
@Geekasaur, maybe the term "vocal register" is not appropriate in addressing this OP?
Jan
16
answered Is it appropriate to say “ I used to be more frightened of spiders that he is now”
Dec
13
awarded  Yearling
Jan
15
comment How to describe students who don't study hard
I really think that in the context of OP who seems to be a foreign speaker, this is the best kind of answer. "Those who don't" provides a good reusable construction, instead of a fancy vocabulary word with limited capacity for reuse.
Jan
11
comment Meter in Clare's “I am”
I hear the same stress pattern, FWIW.
Jan
11
comment Are both “see you at the lesson” and “see you in the lesson” correct?
@Kris, I read this question as pertaining to the combination of "in/at" and "lesson". Where did you read anything that indicates otherwise? I understand you're trying to be helpful but I'm not sure you're entirely right on this one.
Jan
11
comment 'Do you know where I'm coming from?'
Jim, I think you and I are feeling basically the same thing and just disagreeing on which side is the "side of caution". I was erring on safer being less restrictive of a speaker's choice of expression but upon further consideration, you may be right here. Thanks for the further insight! :)
Jan
11
awarded  Commentator
Jan
11
comment Can you use “procure” to mean “think of”?
@Blue, I would agree with Mike that although you might be able to convince us that it is correct in some legalistic sense, a modern educated American would probably read the sentence and think it was written at least 150 years ago. I think that's not the your goal. :)
Jan
11
comment Is the usage of word, “Deck” as a package of paper limited to cards?
Legitimate, but the usage is not very common. It is liable to cause significant confusion without abundant context!
Jan
11
comment Are both “see you at the lesson” and “see you in the lesson” correct?
I want to back up Andrew completely here. In American usage, a lesson is not considered a place, but rather an event. It has no "in" and so only the first one is correct. However, I also have the sense that both would be acceptable in Britain.
Jan
11
answered 'Do you know where I'm coming from?'
Jan
11
awarded  Critic
Dec
28
comment Usage of “even if”
Are you asking only about punctuation or do you have some doubts about a sentence should be structured if it involves "even if"?
Dec
28
answered Usage of “even if”
Dec
28
answered Phrase help for do's and don'ts