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2d
accepted At least two or more: Not always redundant?
Jan
25
comment Usage of “On” in titles
Maybe transliteration from Latin, or Latin syntax, given the history of Latin as the language used previously by European scholars.
Jan
22
comment Is it proper to say, “This is my Uncle Archie's current wife.”
Sure. If you want to say that your uncle changes wives like the direction of the wind changes.
Jan
20
answered Informal of “Fixing problem is in progress”
Jan
20
comment I'm the same age as you are. Then…am I age?
@Bling. Yes, correct. Like, "This pencil is the same length as that pen." "This room is the same temperature as that room." etc.
Jan
20
revised I'm the same age as you are. Then…am I age?
added 11 characters in body
Jan
20
answered I'm the same age as you are. Then…am I age?
Jan
15
comment What is the Japanese equivalent for francophile?
I have never heard either "Nipponophile" or "weeaboo" in my three decades as a Japan resident and Japanophile.
Jan
15
answered What is the Japanese equivalent for francophile?
Dec
16
awarded  Promoter
Dec
9
comment What is the opposite of “simultaneously”?
Thanks. That's a helpful list. I wonder, though, if things could be added at the same time but separately. For example, two things that are often united, such as a nut an a bolt, are added, say, to a lubricant can, uncoupled, and so separately, but at the same time.
Dec
9
revised “Each” in potential subject position in compound sentence always pronoun?
further clarification
Dec
9
asked What is the opposite of “simultaneously”?
Dec
4
asked “Each” in potential subject position in compound sentence always pronoun?
Dec
2
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
1
revised “IoT”: How well understood is this abbreviation, especially when heard, not read?
added 1 character in body
Dec
1
comment “IoT”: How well understood is this abbreviation, especially when heard, not read?
And would people in tech easily understand it if spoken, such as in "Here are the great things that eye-oh-tea will provide in the near future"?
Dec
1
asked “IoT”: How well understood is this abbreviation, especially when heard, not read?
Nov
30
comment Single-word term for “Number of employees”
Sure. Except that "headcount" is kind of ugly, isn't it.
Nov
30
comment When can a celebrity be referred to by their surname only?
I think Faulkner belongs in the Einstein list. And maybe Vonnegut.