1,383 reputation
721
bio website
location Japan
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 2 hours ago

Jan
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
20
comment What's wrong with 'Bananas are unable to grow in cold countries'?
I asked a related question before: english.stackexchange.com/questions/208102/… Some Japanese teach the grammar "rule" that "is able" cannot be used with inanimate objects.
Jan
20
awarded  Custodian
Jan
20
reviewed Approve She, as well as I (am/is/are?) tired of the work
Jan
16
answered More common/informal way of saying “as is the case with…”?
Jan
13
comment She, as well as I (am/is/are?) tired of the work
JoelAZ, it does sound a bit stilted or unnatural, but would you say that for any sentence with the same structure? How about "Frank, as well as Bob, works on Saturday."
Jan
13
answered Is “two-Perrier” lunch a businessmen’s buzz word?
Jan
13
answered She, as well as I (am/is/are?) tired of the work
Jan
7
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
16
asked Respective: Lines connect a circle and two respective squares
Dec
15
asked Administer the patient the drug? Administer the patient with the drug?
Dec
9
comment What happened to “You're welcome?”
I find the explanation by user3182445 that "You're welcome" can sound arrogant absolutely baffling! Is this an age issue? These days I hear young people respond to "Thank you" by saying "Uh huh," which sounds totally arrogant to my old-man ears. How is it that our impressions are completely the opposite?
Dec
9
comment What happened to “You're welcome?”
I find this explanation odd. If someone says "Thank you" to me, I reply with "You're welcome." What I find arrogant-sounding is people who reply to "Thank you" with "Uh huh". To me that sounds like the person being thanked is saying, "Yes, you do (of course) thank me."
Dec
9
comment What happened to “You're welcome?”
And when the reply isn't "Thank you," it's "Uh huh."
Nov
27
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
17
asked “Has changed since March 1” vs “Changed on March 1”
Nov
14
asked “Can” vs “Able to”: People/Animals vs. Inanimate Objects
Oct
31
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Oct
10
comment What is the one word to describe something that has no beginning nor an end?
eternal: 1. Being without beginning or end (thefreedictionary.com/eternal)