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Apr
9
comment An adjective to describe a person who has come back from failure
This is a good one!
Apr
9
comment An adjective to describe a person who has come back from failure
Not sure this quite captures it. Defeat not quite failure. And the indomitable one wouldn't have failed/be beaten to begin with... just my thoughts though. This might work better in a different context.
Feb
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
23
comment Should it be “there is a total of 378 vehicles” or “there are a total of 378 vehicles”?
A related question here: english.stackexchange.com/q/8545/2705
Jan
23
comment A word for a poor student striving to attend his expensive dream college free of debt
I didn't vote to close but I'd have to agree with ab2 that this is beyond the scope of EL&U. By the way, I was also like your brother -- got into my dream college, no aid (meanwhile aid at other schools). Thanks to the extreme sacrifices of my parents, and others, I made it thru college debt-free. Looking back, I may have been more reasonable but dreams do come true, and I'm an optimist just like he :)
Jan
14
comment Is it ok to start a sentence with “also”?
I like this answer too!
Jan
13
comment Is it recommended to use “we” in research papers?
@GEdgar Haha - taking it too far!!
Jan
12
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
11
comment Is there an English word to describe a group of refrain words composed of two syllables e.g. pera-pera, meaning fluently, iki-iki meaning vividly?
@Mitch: As Yoichi clarified, these reduplications are adverbial, and as others have shown, this does occur in English, to a degree (although the onomatopoeic variety might be the most familiar, e.g. helter-skelter and the like). Some of the recent informal constructions in English (e.g. now-now, chop-chop) can be traced to other cultures that adopted the language during Imperial times...
Jan
11
comment Is there an English word to describe a group of refrain words composed of two syllables e.g. pera-pera, meaning fluently, iki-iki meaning vividly?
@Yoichi: Yes this is certainly a universal phenomenon (albeit more pronounced in some more than others)!
Dec
10
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
9
awarded  Yearling
Nov
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
29
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
28
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
25
awarded  Guru