1,063 reputation
1917
bio website jaerhard.com
location Karlsruhe, Germany
age 48
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Mar 28 at 12:32

Just some guy having too many accounts on too many sites (and most of those I can't even remember ;-)


Jan
14
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
1
awarded  Pundit
Dec
9
awarded  Yearling
Dec
2
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
17
comment Should it be “100% donations policy” or “100% donation policy”?
I think you're reading too much into this. ;-)
Jun
10
comment “My friends and I” vs. “My friends and me” vs. “Me and my friends”
"generations of schoolmarms" can't win against the natural evolution of language. That which flows better wins (of course, flow most often depends on what one hears more often, which sounds/feels more familiar)
May
2
comment Meaning and origin of “if you catch my drift”
The good old(!) roaring twenties!
Mar
4
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
9
awarded  Yearling
Dec
6
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
22
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
21
comment Election or Elections?
-1 because you're didn't really grasp the complete picture. I'd use "he's won the elections" for the POTUS. Because... it's a number of independent elections which culminate in chosing the President. Or any other form where there are multiple mostly independent elections (different electoral board and such) but the end result is, as you say, one position. Most parliamentary elections are, yes, elections. Even though they combine to "elect" the prime minister (or chancellor or whatever the head honcho's title is)
Jun
23
comment A better alternative for the word 'urine'
"number one" is most common? Any sources for that (apart from Google which is clearly useless here)? Never heard of it. Oh, I see it's used in schools a lot. US schools, I surmise. So... wouldn't know it. Do adults use it?
Jun
8
awarded  Constituent
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
May
15
revised What is the difference between “to thump” and “to punch”?
edge -> corner and "to thump" (not thumb)
May
15
suggested suggested edit on What is the difference between “to thump” and “to punch”?
Mar
1
comment “We've got you covered” on an umbrella
Could it be this umbrella is a promotion gift from an insurance company?
Mar
1
comment “We've got you covered” on an umbrella
So, what is the difference between a pun and a play on words? I thought it was one and the same? (And so does, from what I recall, Terry Pratchett in multiple Discworld novels)
Feb
18
comment What does “shooting trout in a demitasse cup” mean?
@Yoichi This -- taking an established idiom or saying and constructing variations -- is used quite often in English. I like to refer to "with a grain of salt" (the well-known phrase), and its malleability: depending on how doubtful a mention bit of data is, you can recommend "a spoonful of salt" all up to "a sixty-car freight train full of salt". Or any other imaginative measurement.