Reputation
3,104
Next privilege 5,000 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
2 6 25
Newest
 Populist
Impact
~84k people reached

Jul
21
comment English word for camel's walk
Run is not the word for a horse's walk. Walk is the word.
Jul
9
answered Verb for doing something unknowingly
Mar
6
revised synonym for “worth finding”
added 564 characters in body
Mar
6
comment synonym for “worth finding”
@HotLicks I don't think we actually have enough context to say that. Depending on the larger context, they may be "about the same" or significantly different. Insufficient data. Certainly I would not assume they are the same without more information.
Mar
6
answered synonym for “worth finding”
Mar
3
comment A fraction of something
This has become beyond pointlesscontinue this discussion in chat.
Mar
3
comment A fraction of something
The OP has given no context. You have made an assumption. I have not. Given the use of "always" in the question, I will not make that assumption in an answer.
Mar
3
comment A fraction of something
For proper/improper en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… and montereyinstitute.org/courses/DevelopmentalMath/… For a clear general definition of fractions encyclopediaofmath.org/index.php/Fraction Would either of you care to cite evidence for this "default" claim? How can it even matter, if only common usage is relevant, as both of you have said? Either the technical meaning is irrelevant or you should accept it and stop cherry-picking arbitrary portions of it.
Mar
2
comment A fraction of something
Always. The question is "Does it always imply". I do not choose to take arbitrary Google percentages as an excuse for sloppiness.
Mar
2
answered What is it called when you use something in a sentence that will be replaced?
Mar
2
revised A fraction of something
added 27 characters in body
Mar
2
comment A fraction of something
As I said to Kris, English is also used by mathematicians (and scientists and software engineers). And what they class as casual conversation is rather more pedantic and accurate than the norm. So I included that context, although emphasising its niche. Next you'll be trying to tell me there's no place for pedantry on ELU (which would require the deletion of a very proper fraction of the content).
Mar
2
comment A fraction of something
OK, now that's an argument. Fine. But I'm saying that in a technical context, dealing with the kind of pedants I work with every day, you could not assume that "a fraction of" implies a ratio less than one. In the same way that physicists and engineers know that acceleration can be negative and would never assume that somebody would only ever say "deceleration" when a negative acceleration was involved. So in my answer, I mentioned that special case. And then said "in any other case, it will (almost certainly) mean less than one".
Mar
2
comment A fraction of something
Your statement about not considering improper fractions is simply wrong and not relevant. If general English usage is the only relevant context, then the difference between improper, proper and common fractions is completely irrelevant (because those mathematical terms are not in common use) and unnecessary. If you do insist on using the technical definitions as justification, then their actual meaning is pertinent. Taking "improper function" and choosing the non-technical meaning of "improper" is confusing maths and general English usage. You're doing that, not me.
Mar
2
revised A fraction of something
added 85 characters in body
Mar
2
comment A fraction of something
@EdwinAshworth I'm having difficulty parsing what you wrote but it seems to be an argument with something I haven't actually said.
Mar
2
comment A fraction of something
@anemone Amended as you requested for clarity.
Mar
2
comment A fraction of something
@EdwinAshworth If the default sense is "common fraction" then you are indeed incorrect. The opposite of an improper fraction is a proper one, not a common one, and both of those are subsets of the set of common fractions. 4/3 and 1/1 are both common fractions.
Mar
2
comment A fraction of something
@EdwinAshworth the simple mathematical definition of a fraction is that it is a rational number expressed as the ratio of a and b where a and b are both integers. That they are different integers is not part of the definition. In category theory, labelling one variable a and another b gives the option that they be different, not the requirement.
Mar
2
comment A fraction of something
@FumbleFingers Precisely. If the context is one where accuracy is expected. In casual use, that would be pedantry, of course.