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I have worked in commercial IT, academia, the voluntary sector and the performing arts. All of this informs my attitude to language.


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comment Etymology of legal meaning of 'dispositive'
If dispositive is simply an adjective derived from dispose, for which you list the etymology above, I do not understand your problem. You have the etymology right there. And "put in order" is perfect meaning. Remember, this is an old legal term (Merriam-Webster has the first known use in 1618), created and used by people familiar with both Latin and French, not least because "Law French" was used in English courts well into the 17th century.
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comment Word meaning “to walk/run around something”?
What kind of house design would force somebody to go completely around a house to see the yard? Is it built on a Mobius strip?
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comment Word meaning “to walk/run around something”?
Do you mean all the way around or just part of the way around? "to see what was happening in the yard" implies only partially, which really rules out circle or circumnavigate
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reviewed Reviewed High and Tight Meaning
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comment Word for “someone who warns”
Wrong. They don't just watch, they maintain order by enforcing rules and telling people how to behave or what they are doing to break the rules. Is part of the definition. Read again. You seem to be ignoring part of the definition to justify a preconception.
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comment Word for “someone who warns”
It is old fashioned and not widely used, @ermanen, but not yet obsolete. "a person who admonishes, especially with reference to conduct." That is what hall monitors (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hall_monitor) do and why they have that name.
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reviewed Reviewed What is the explanation of this error
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reviewed No Action Needed What is the best term in (global) copywriting: “sticky tape”, “tape”, “scotch tape” or “sellotape”?
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reviewed No Action Needed Do military titles get capitalized?
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comment A question about using an apostrophe with “is”
So your problem is with my comment, not my answer, since my comment is where I mentioned a film dialogue (as a joke). This is not productive. It seems like ridiculous quibbling.
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comment A question about using an apostrophe with “is”
Your point is, in any case, invalid. I never said that particular example was in common use, I simply offered it as an example of unnecessary ambiguity. Can you cite any reference to say it is ungrammatical English, as opposed to simply unwise (which how I see it)?
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comment A question about using an apostrophe with “is”
You aren't watching the wrong crap British gangster films. I recommend a crash course in the complete works of Guy Ritchie and Jason Statham.
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reviewed No Action Needed Why “hoist” in “Hoist with one's own petard”?
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answered A question about using an apostrophe with “is”
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comment President “Obamar”
And a Scots/English one as well.
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reviewed No Action Needed A question about using an apostrophe with “is”
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reviewed Reviewed What do you call two words that contradict each other in a sentence?
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comment Is there a word for a fake radar reading?
Do you mean accidental false readings, caused by technical failure or poor signal quality (interference, weather conditions etc)? Or do you mean deliberate deception causing false readings (chaff and other technologies)? Or both?
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comment Is there a word for a fake radar reading?
A decoy is also an object (ask any duck hunter) but I agree it's not what you are looking for.
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comment Is there a word for a fake radar reading?
"9/11 conspiracy theory"