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Oct
14
comment How do I use possessive when talking about a book written by two authors?
Hmm. You're probably correct, but I think it [the double-possessive] sounds too fussy in everyday speech. I prefer my quote above, as I think it sounds more natural. DeMarco-and-Lister is an easier entity to process than Tom-DeMarco-and-Timothy-Lister.
Oct
14
comment How do I use possessive when talking about a book written by two authors?
Probably just brevity, and to show that the speaker is very familiar with a work. It's very common when discussing literature - "have you read much Tolstoy?"
Oct
14
comment How do I use possessive when talking about a book written by two authors?
Probably the first form, and consider dropping the first names. "Have you read DeMarco and Lister's Peopleware?"
Oct
14
awarded  Autobiographer
May
29
comment Is the word “palaver” in common use anywhere in the English-speaking world?
Wow, there was a really big palaver in the 1660s! Must have been the Great Fire of London.
Nov
28
answered Meaning of “fearless to a fault”
Oct
5
awarded  Yearling
Oct
2
answered General history of the English language – book / website recommendation?
Sep
29
awarded  Supporter
Sep
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
20
answered A word that means beneficial for the individual or few but bad for everyone if everyone is doing it?
Sep
19
comment What do you call hypothetical inhabitants living on the Moon?
I think it depends on the context. Is it the 'official name' of the people (Lunarians might fit this), a derogatory nickname given by the people (Moonies perhaps), or a nickname given by the Moon-dwellers to describe themselves, which will make them sound good (so perhaps Moonwalkers)?
Sep
18
answered what does “flip the bird” mean?
Nov
16
answered Word for: 'Because of war'
Oct
30
awarded  Teacher
Oct
30
answered Whimsical: “Lost the rag”. Origins and just what is “the rag” anyway?
Oct
5
comment What is the difference between “apart”, “except”, “other than” and “besides”?
Just "except" doesn't sound right to me (in British English). I'm willing to admit I'm wrong :)
Oct
5
answered What is the difference between “apart”, “except”, “other than” and “besides”?