659 reputation
45
bio website onestop.co.uk
location United Kingdom
age
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Nov 1 '13 at 18:46

Medical statistician currently based in the UK. Active mainly on stats.stackexchange.com, also known as CrossValidated, but with occasional forays onto other stackexchange sites.


Dec
8
awarded  Yearling
Dec
8
awarded  Yearling
May
3
answered 'I got a dream' vs. 'I dreamt'
Dec
8
awarded  Yearling
Nov
30
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
22
answered Can “thanks in advance” be considered rude?
Apr
9
comment Is there a single word for “one who speaks/boasts a lot about everything”?
+1 for 'braggart', which is the word that came to my mind too. 'know-it-all' seems more specific to knowledge rather than skills. I think 'blow-hard' should be marked "mainly US" - I've never heard of it in the UK, and i think it could easily be completely misunderstood...
Apr
4
comment Use of the term “maths”
Duplicate of english.stackexchange.com/questions/990/math-or-maths
Mar
13
answered Heavy usage of synonyms in English or not?
Mar
12
comment What's the most appropriate name for non-italicized text: “roman” or “upright”?
No, but in some typefaces the italic face is upright i.e. they are cursive but not slanted, so 'italic' and 'upright' can't be antonyms, else 'upright italic' would be an oxymoron, which it isn't.
Mar
12
comment “It would not do to confuse the nurses with the patients”
(+1) I'd add that this phrase does sound rather dated now in spoken English. It sounds like the vocabulary of a character in an Agatha Christie or PG Wodehouse country house novel, rather than contemporary British English. "Come come, old chap, it simply would not do!"
Mar
12
answered Is “below par” good or bad?
Mar
12
awarded  Editor
Mar
12
revised What's the most appropriate name for non-italicized text: “roman” or “upright”?
typography
Mar
12
answered What's the most appropriate name for non-italicized text: “roman” or “upright”?
Mar
10
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Feb
26
comment “on the train” or “in the train”?
That appears to make it more logical. However, I've got off the train and now I'm on the bus.
Feb
26
awarded  Teacher
Feb
26
answered “on the train” or “in the train”?