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1d
comment What is the origin of “analogue” as a term meaning “non-digital?”
@javaNoobs Ah, I now see that I misread this answer as saying that this use of "analogue" arose because digital signals were an analogue of analogue signals. (You can see why I found this confusing.) Re-reading it now, I see what was actually intended, and it makes much more sense.
1d
comment What is the origin of “analogue” as a term meaning “non-digital?”
It seems like there's a lot of debate about this question. I'll therefore hold off accepting any of these answers until the debate has cooled down (and hopefully reached a mutually-satisfying conclusion).
1d
comment What is the origin of “analogue” as a term meaning “non-digital?”
Given this origin, I'd have expected 'analogue' to become a synonym of digital, rather than taking on the opposed meaning it now has. Then again, it wouldn't be the first time English has done something that doesn't make sense even when explained.
Apr
24
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
24
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
24
asked What is the origin of “analogue” as a term meaning “non-digital?”
Apr
13
comment Is “incomplex” a legitimate word?
Can you provide a reference of some sort for that, I mean.
Apr
13
comment Is “incomplex” a legitimate word?
Oh? In which canon?
Apr
1
comment How did 'drone' come to mean both 'one who does no work' and 'one who spends most of the time doing menial work'?
@HotLicks Don't we usually try and answer in answers, rather than comments?
Mar
31
comment How to pronounce (OS X) Yosemite in Australian English
I suspect most Aussies are familiar enough with the word "Yosemite" that "jɵˈsεmɨti" is the normal pronunciation pattern.
Mar
30
comment Are there English figurative expressions equivalent to Japanese idiom 馬耳東風 meaning a person who doesn’t listen to other’s advice?
Or a loose cannon.
Mar
26
comment Why can you not “improve your English ability”?
@WS2 I reckon you should make that an answer.
Mar
24
comment Is “women men girls love meet die” a valid sentence?
Gah, I accidentally flagged this answer. Mods, please ignore the flag.
Mar
16
comment What are some alternative words for an item that casts magic spells?
@Bretsky You should edit that into your question, then; As written, you're asking for any tools that could be used for magic, not just synonyms for wand. Dreamcatchers, for instance. Or throwing bones, or beads, or wax tablets, or books, or... Well, there's thousands of tools that could be used for magic, really.
Mar
16
comment What are some alternative words for an item that casts magic spells?
As far as I can tell, this is a question about what objects are symbolically associated with expressing magic in pop culture, not with English Language and Usage. I'll flag it.
Mar
10
comment Is “America” an example of markedness?
WS2 is right about "dollars." I live in Australia, and if a local fruit vendor claimed his prices were in American dollars, I'd assume he was either crazy or trying to scam me.
Mar
4
comment How come the Latin word “Vulgaris” acquired such negative meaning in English?
@PrahladYeri I'd say that almost everyone has been one of the common people since the dawn of time. If the common were ever a minority - well, they wouldn't be so common, would they?
Mar
2
comment Is “glass cannon” a generally recognized phrase?
This answer seems to have gone off on a bit of a tangent. Do you think you could tighten it up, and put more emphasis on how it answers the question?
Feb
18
comment Can the word “capsize” be used for cars?
To be fair, I wouldn't be surprised to see a car capsize, provided it was already floating downriver.
Feb
12
comment Meaning of “Bump” on forums
@user3109672 You're right, but comments aren't forever; You should put that answer in an answer.