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1d
comment Is the use of investigating in the sentence grammatically correct?
You might want to edit that into your answer, since comments don't last forever.
1d
comment Is there an English equivalent to the Chinese saying, 君子之交淡如水 …?
@JoeBlow It's true that a fast answer doesn't use ink, but a wrong answer causes confusion and misunderstandings, and a fast wrong answer causes confusion and misunderstandings faster. Efficiency is only as virtuous as the action to which it is applied.
1d
comment Is the use of investigating in the sentence grammatically correct?
Which is to say, the use called out in the OP is incorrect.
2d
comment Is the adjective “abject” ever found with any word other than “poverty”? Does it mean something other than “very” or “utterly”?
@Chellspecker I imagine it's the same school of thought that gave rise to "Show me a man who is content, and I will show you a man who has given up."
May
20
comment What is the equivalent of “Jack o'lantern” in British English?
@Em1 In this modern age of electronic keyboards, typewriters and their carriages have largely fallen out of use. Many people know the key you speak of as "Enter" or "Return." It really is useful.
May
15
comment Captain America said “if you get killed, walk it off!” How to understand “walk it off”?
It's considered good form to provide a reference or other basis for any claim you make in an answer.
May
15
comment Please kill me or just shoot me now
@PapaPoule Make that an answer!
May
5
comment Can I Switch from “it” to “he” or “she” when referring to an animal in a story?
Why do you suspect this wouldn't be OK?
Apr
27
comment What is the origin of “analogue” as a term meaning “non-digital?”
@javaNoobs Ah, I now see that I misread this answer as saying that this use of "analogue" arose because digital signals were an analogue of analogue signals. (You can see why I found this confusing.) Re-reading it now, I see what was actually intended, and it makes much more sense.
Apr
27
comment What is the origin of “analogue” as a term meaning “non-digital?”
It seems like there's a lot of debate about this question. I'll therefore hold off accepting any of these answers until the debate has cooled down (and hopefully reached a mutually-satisfying conclusion).
Apr
27
comment What is the origin of “analogue” as a term meaning “non-digital?”
Given this origin, I'd have expected 'analogue' to become a synonym of digital, rather than taking on the opposed meaning it now has. Then again, it wouldn't be the first time English has done something that doesn't make sense even when explained.
Apr
24
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
24
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
24
asked What is the origin of “analogue” as a term meaning “non-digital?”
Apr
13
comment Is “incomplex” a legitimate word?
Can you provide a reference of some sort for that, I mean.
Apr
13
comment Is “incomplex” a legitimate word?
Oh? In which canon?
Apr
1
comment How did 'drone' come to mean both 'one who does no work' and 'one who spends most of the time doing menial work'?
@HotLicks Don't we usually try and answer in answers, rather than comments?
Mar
31
comment How to pronounce (OS X) Yosemite in Australian English
I suspect most Aussies are familiar enough with the word "Yosemite" that "jɵˈsεmɨti" is the normal pronunciation pattern.
Mar
30
comment Are there English figurative expressions equivalent to Japanese idiom 馬耳東風 meaning a person who doesn’t listen to other’s advice?
Or a loose cannon.
Mar
26
comment Why can you not “improve your English ability”?
@WS2 I reckon you should make that an answer.