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2d
comment Is there a non-romantic phrase for missing someone?
"I miss you" has too strong a connotation of romance? What region are you in?
2d
comment Is there a better term for 'low-level?'
Personally, I think of "foundational" as having a connotation of being basic, but +1 for the other suggestions.
Apr
16
comment Good word for something physical that's inexplicable
@Jim A thing can be invisible but found by feel in the dark. Especially if it's a sharp-cornered coffee table and you're half-asleep.
Apr
9
comment What term describes workers that are not “knowledge workers”?
@shane the opposite of "man" could be "woman," "boy," "alien," "machine," or any number of other terms depending on context. A thing can have more than one opposite.
Apr
4
comment What would be a word for describing a tendency to take the literal meaning of words above the accepted meaning?
Links can break and die. Would it be possible to copy the relevant parts of the definition into this answer?
Apr
4
comment In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?
@Jim The lever and the wedge are both classified as machines... So I guess if you didn't mind explaining that every time someone asked, you could go with "machine."
Apr
3
comment What would be a word for describing a tendency to take the literal meaning of words above the accepted meaning?
I agree that it's a perfectly legitimate usage of the term. My point is not that the usage of the word is illegitimate, it is that this answer does not specify the contexts in which it is and isn't. Not all readers of this answer will be familiar with the word; If this answer is intended to help them, surely you should provide that level of detail?
Mar
31
comment What's a word for having your identity stolen?
"Help, I've been selfnapped!"
Mar
31
comment Laws I created that I must follow?
Some people call the rules they set for themselves "resolutions," since they're things they are resolved to do; Might that fit your purposes?
Mar
20
awarded  Good Question
Mar
19
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
19
comment Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
@WS2 'Senior' can be a title, but I've not heard of it being used as a term of address for someone of greater seniority than the speaker, so I wouldn't say it was an equivalent. Perhaps regionally, or in some subcultures?
Mar
19
comment Meaning and Correctness of “to have masses said for someone's soul”
From memory, "Mass" is one of the seven sacraments of Catholicism, and is found in some form in a number of other Christian sects; In practice, it's a particular kind of religious ritual: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_(liturgy)
Mar
19
comment Aren’t there English equivalents to Japanese word, Senpai (先輩) meaning a senior in school, career, or age?
English doesn't assume that relative seniority within a given social rank is any indication that they might be deserving of special courtesy. I'm not sure why this should be. Perhaps, historically, occupation-specific titles of seniority were common enough to make a senpai-equivalent redundant in most cases, or social hierarchies were usually based on some distinction other than relative seniority? I'm just speculating. In any case, the English language does not have a courtesy title for people of greater seniority than the speaker.
Mar
19
comment Word for a person who is overly profound?
I find it difficult to imagine a situation where profundity might cause a problem; Some context would definitely be useful.
Mar
19
comment Why do we say “Present Arms” instead of “Present Your Arms”?
Presumably it must happen occasionally, though. Who writes the manuals?
Mar
19
awarded  Scholar
Mar
19
accepted Why are knobs called “pots” by some sound designers?
Mar
18
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
18
awarded  Nice Question