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seen Dec 24 at 3:08

Dec
24
comment Word to describe ideology of unfettered belief in rational self-interest
Is there any reason why "enlightened self-interest" doesn't work?
Dec
24
comment “How do you do”--what does it mean and when did most of society opt to no longer say it?
This doesn't seem to answer the question asked.
Dec
11
comment Removing offensiveness from swear word
Also - and just to address one small part of the question body - there is no consensus on how relatively offensive particular words might be.
Nov
13
comment What's an item called that was required to progress in a video game, but now isn't?
I'd describe them as jargon, rather than slang, myself.
Nov
12
comment In search of a word this is in either in English or Latin
@BlazeOfLight You shouldn't need a tag to indicate English at all - This is ELU; If you're getting answers in other languages, we're doing it wrong.
Oct
29
comment A word describes the person who tends to stereotype people
A stereotypist is someone who presses keys with both hands.
Oct
16
comment How would you say e.g. creativity isn't something that only belongs to graphic designers?
I want to suggest "Graphic designers don't have a monopoly on creativity" but without knowing why and how you want to use this phrase, it's impossible to know if that's a good suggestion or not. Could you provide more information?
Oct
14
comment Are there big difference in the degree of zeal among "fan, enthusiast, maniac, fiend, geek, zealot”? If Yes, what are they in order of the enthusiasm?
Related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/38284/…
Oct
14
comment Are there big difference in the degree of zeal among "fan, enthusiast, maniac, fiend, geek, zealot”? If Yes, what are they in order of the enthusiasm?
Ooh, this is going to be an interesting one - The terms you described differ not only in level of enthusiasm they connote, but also the ways in which that enthusiasm is typically expressed and the relationship implied to exist between the person and the interest. Plus, the meanings of all of those terms have drifted with time, so there'll need to be some analysis of that, too.
Oct
2
comment How to define someone who does not like/want to get a job or do anything in life?
Only if he's actually on the dole; Otherwise he's just a bludger.
Oct
1
comment Gender neutral term for “maiden name”?
This question kinda makes me wish that "bachelor name" was a thing.
Sep
23
comment Equivalent word for 'overseas' for a non-island country?
I agree with ChrisW: You'd use "foreign investors," never "abroad investors." Abroad is still a great answer, though.
Sep
18
comment What is a polite way of talking about a recently-deceased person?
@Doc cwallenpoole's comment introduces a new character, the late Mr. Smith's exasperated wife. It's a bit of off-topic humour, but no gender-bending is involved.
Sep
18
comment What does “root against something” mean? Isn’t it an idiom?
Note that this particular use of "root" is not well known in Australia (and will earn you some funny looks, because root has a rather vulgar meaning when used as a verb in that country.) The word used in place of root is "barrack," and it's a near-perfect synonym; If you ask an Australian which team he or she barracks for, you'll be immediately understood.
Sep
12
comment I need another way of saying 'does the talking'
What's wrong with "Where flavour does the talking?" We'd have an easier time coming up with a solution if we knew what the problem was.
Sep
2
accepted Is there an equivalent of 'onomatopoeia' for words inspired by the appearance of thing?
Aug
22
comment Is there a word for “a variety of breakfast foods”
@choster The context has a lot of impact on the meaning. If someone said "a breakfast spread" on its own, I'd assume the meaning you suggest - but if they instead said "The breakfast provided was a real spread" then I'd assume choster's meaning applied to every instance of "breakfast spread" in the remainder of the passage. That being said, I agree this answer could be substantially improved by examples of use and references.
Aug
22
comment Is there a more general word for velocitized?
Are you able to reword your sentence to use "acclimatised?"
Aug
21
comment Is asking “come again?” to a complete stranger over the phone rude?
@ÅStuart When you say "pardon" on its own, it might not be obvious to someone unfamiliar with the expression, but "beg your pardon" is explicitly begging the other person to grant the speaker a pardon. I find it difficult to imagine misconstruing that.
Aug
21
comment How do I politely say I have used my mouth while drinking water from a bottle?
@DavidSchwartz I suspect the emphasis varies regionally.