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bio website english.stackexchange.com/…
location United Kingdom
age 60
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 2 hours ago

I did my degree in English/French Language/Linguistics back in the '70s, but I only got a middling grade, and I've worked in software development ever since, so I'm really only an expert on English language in the same way any articulate native speaker is.

To save the trouble of repeatedly doing it on individual posts, I'll just say here that I don't come to EL&U looking for arguments. If I come across as contentious that will nearly always be inadvertent carelessness on my part.

Anyway - if you have been, thanks for reading.


Nov
19
comment Is “Helper Verb” Old School?
@curiousdannii: That seems likely to me. Though I must admit, without access to a spellchecker I might well choose to use "helper" purely because I'm confident I can at least spell that one right! :)
Nov
19
comment “He will come back in two hours” vs. “He will come back after two hours”
@curiousdannii: That just creates an ambiguity that's not relevant to OP's context. Will he return two hours after the time of speaking, or two hours after he leaves? (i.e. - three hours after time of speaking).
Nov
19
comment Is “Helper Verb” Old School?
@Jim: I don't have the relevant specialised knowledge regarding who used/uses what terminology in this area. All that graph shows is that one form has always been much more common than the other, but for all I know some (or even many) grammarians may distinguish different meanings for those terms. Or there might be a third term that's actually preferred by the professionals.
Nov
19
comment What does 'stat' mean in this sentence?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about a domain-specific specialised usage based on the name of a Linux command (or parameter thereto).
Nov
19
comment “He will come back in two hours” vs. “He will come back after two hours”
There isn't any "diff". If the intended sense is that he may return at any time during the next two hours (but not later), that would be phrased as "He will come back within two hours".
Nov
19
comment rise in prices such <as> occurred [relative pronoun?]
I think this question might be better asked on English Language Learners - but as it stands, I'm not sure exactly what's being asked anyway.
Nov
19
comment Is “Helper Verb” Old School?
If we're to believe Google Books, "helper verb" had some currency in the 40s. But relatively speaking, "auxiliary verb" has always been way more common.
Nov
19
answered For the first time - the first time
Nov
19
revised Book: There Are Two Errors in the the Title of This Book
added 215 characters in body
Nov
19
comment Book: There Are Two Errors in the the Title of This Book
@mplungjan: That's a rather bold statement to make, given there's no universal standard for title capitalisation! (Though I concede few style guides would be likely to endorse capitalising This but not the). But I find it interesting that the book cover doesn't match OP's transcription, so despite my CV I will point that out in an answer...
Nov
19
answered Book: There Are Two Errors in the the Title of This Book
Nov
19
comment Book: There Are Two Errors in the the Title of This Book
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about logic and lateral thinking, not English usage.
Nov
18
comment “A nounfull” of something
I can remember being a kid with either leaky Wellington boots, or boots that weren't high enough for the water I was standing in. It was certainly possible back then to get a wellyful. Or welliful - obviously I never saw it written down.
Nov
18
reviewed Leave Open How do I list related phrases?
Nov
18
reviewed Leave Open What's the oral address of “fellow student”?
Nov
18
reviewed Leave Open Ambiguious anaphora in a speech
Nov
18
reviewed Leave Open The use of congratulations
Nov
18
reviewed Leave Open The use “habit ” as an alternative to “used to”
Nov
18
reviewed Leave Open Distress vs anguish
Nov
18
comment What is a possible equivalent for *not worth the paper it's written on*
@ChrisW: Noting OP's recent comment, I imagine we seek a term applied to inferences made using Google Books.