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Apr
14
reviewed Delete Difference in “capable” and “able”
Apr
14
reviewed Delete Is it “anybody have plans” or “anybody has plans”?
Apr
14
reviewed Delete Is there a word that means cheating but legitimate?
Apr
14
reviewed No Action Needed Why there is no article before words like queen and king?
Apr
14
reviewed Reviewed What is the plural of “scenario”?
Apr
14
reviewed No Action Needed What does graphological deviation mean in stylistics analysis?
Apr
14
reviewed No Action Needed Is “switched” always used as a verb?
Apr
14
reviewed No Action Needed Hypernym for “for sale”, “for rent”, etc
Apr
14
reviewed Reviewed How and in which situation can the word “meditate” be used?
Apr
14
reviewed Reviewed “much too [something]” vs “too much [something]”
Apr
13
comment Transforming 'is based on' from passive to active voice
Hegel's dialectics are/form the base/basis of Marxism.
Apr
13
comment What is the difference between “at least as surprising as” and “more surprising than”?
I've always ignored those Nigerian emails promising me at least £50,000 if I pay a £100 processing fee, on the grounds that the risk/reward ratio is just a little bit too high. But I might be tempted by one that offered me more than £50,000 for the same "investment". Maybe I'll only get £50,000.01, but it would be quite exciting to see exactly how much more (twice as much, maybe?).
Apr
13
comment The origin of “break of day”
You're completely mistaken in supposing break "sounds much more like the end of the day". A snooker player starts a new game by breaking off, and disease epidemics, for example, start by breaking out. Granted, when a fever breaks, that means it's ended, but the word break itself simply implies a significant change in such contexts, not particularly a beginning or an end.
Apr
13
comment “When did you go there?” vs “When you went there?”
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it should be asked on English Language Learners
Apr
13
comment meaning of “Better Thanksgiving than never”?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it should be asked on English Language Learners
Apr
13
comment How and in which situation can the word “meditate” be used?
@adityasrivastav: Although I haven't actually closevoted, I see questions like this on ELU as essentially off-topic writing advice. To me, ELU is primarily a site where competent speakers analyse/discuss the whys and wherefores of how English works - the needs of learners are better addressed on English Language Learners.
Apr
13
comment Rules for spelling double consonants in roots of words
@sumelic: You're quite right. I was misled by "roots of words" in the question title. I only studied Latin for a few months (when I was 12!) and no Greek at all, so I don't even think in terms of words like suppose and necessary as having "roots". All my comments are tangential to the issue - unless it's credible to say the reason I'm such a lousy speller is because I know so little about ancient dead languages.
Apr
12
comment Rules for spelling double consonants in roots of words
...apropos which, I've only just discovered from OED that there is (or perhaps, was, since they say it's obsolete apart from US dialect) a verb to flam = deceive by a sham story or trick, or by flattery. I know without really thinking that the continuous participle for that will double up the m, because flamming must be pronounced with a short a (unlike the long a in flaming, implied by the single m). I've no idea of the etymology of either, and sometimes I just think "Life's too short to stuff mushrooms or learn every word's etymology".
Apr
12
comment Rules for spelling double consonants in roots of words
@sumelic: Granted, and I don't disagree with a single word of your answer. But I'm acutely aware that tchrist's (and your) knowledge of Latin (and etymology in general) far exceed my own. And I've been a crap speller for even longer than I've been a crap typist - but I wouldn't misspell many if any of OP's examples. Partly because I've obviously seen them a lot of times, but imho mainly for the "principles" I originally outlined. Not that they're infallible rules, but if you assume they hold good, you only have to remember those cases were they don't apply.
Apr
12
comment Words that sound grammatically incorrect
@JLee: I'm with John on this one. Grammar is a feature of sentences, not words. I don't really understand your question, but I suspect you might be asking for examples of words which could be divided so as to generate two or more different words which can't occur consecutively in a "grammatical" context. If so, I'd have thought you could contrive a context for any pair of words to be "valid". For example, there are Type A men and type B men