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Apr
15
comment Comparing different (but related) qualities in English
For those not familiar with U.S. political jargon, Wikipedia says In the weeks following the 2000 election, however, there arose the terminology of red states and blue states, in which the conservative Republican Party was associated with red and the liberal Democratic Party with blue. That's to say this is for the most part a very new usage. Personally I doubt it'll persist long, given how consistently the rest of the world applies the opposite distinction (red symbolises left-wing ideologies, Red Flag, Red Army, Reds under the beds).
Apr
15
comment What's another way of saying “to hell with it”?
@John Clifford: According to Google Books, only 258 people are are unsatisfied with it (whatever "it" might be), but about 11,600 are are dissatisfied with it.
Apr
15
comment What's another way of saying “to hell with it”?
Nuts! I'm closevoting as POB
Apr
15
comment Variety of English used by the Romantic poets| -eth/-s for the third person singular in particular
... (citing the same passage as OP), Crystal goes on to say that [hates is] a more colloquial tone (it is the normal form in prose), whereas hateth was more formal (it is often used in the 'official' language of stage directions). Then points out that in this specific case, it's much more a simple matter of prosody/metre/rhythm. So I think this question is essentially "Lit Crit".
Apr
15
comment Variety of English used by the Romantic poets| -eth/-s for the third person singular in particular
David Crystal says In the sixteenth century, there were two endings in the present tense of verbs where today we have only one: -th and -s, as in readeth and reads. The -th form was dying out, though it was still routine in doth and hath; but with most verbs there was still a choice.
Apr
15
comment What is the correct answer - “Opening” or “Open”?
Per @agc's answer, Neither sentence is good English, both lack coherence. It looks to me like a typical ESL "multi-choice test" put together by an examiner who's not a native Anglophone in the first place. Voting to migrate to ELL.
Apr
15
comment How can you say when a student receives “a note”?
Does the student necessarily know that the record has been made? I suspect practices like this are gradually reducing over time, but perhaps what you're talking about is what in some educational/supervision environments (particularly, schools) might be called a demerit (North American) A mark awarded against someone for a fault or offence.
Apr
15
comment “opposite” used as a noncount noun?
Your "the opposite of" means "completely different from something" is a somewhat loose definition. If I say cats are the opposite of dogs, for example, I'm completely ignoring the fact that cats and dogs are in most respects very similar (both are quadruped mammals often kept as pets, etc., so they're nowhere near as different as, say, cats and toasters). Things that are opposite are (figuratively) on orthogonally opposite sides of some contextually-relevant distinction*.
Apr
14
comment Joining a semicolon-delimited complex list to a multiple-clause sentence
I don't think there's any scope for using semicolons in your example. If you think the text is unwieldy with so many disparate commas, rephrase it - don't just invent a non-standard orthography.
Apr
14
comment How to say “a man who has a good reputation”
Gene Stewart is well-respected.
Apr
14
comment “opposite” used as a noncount noun?
In principle you could omit the article and say "Wet" is opposite to "dry", but note that you'd have to change the preposition. The sequence evil is opposite to good, for example, gets 182 hits in Google Books, but there are no instances at all of evil is opposite of good.
Apr
14
comment “the best two” vs “the two best”
What @Qaz said. From the runaway top answer on the original: Numbers usually go before adjectives.
Apr
14
accepted “Environmentally-friendly” vs. “Environment-friendly”
Apr
13
reviewed Close Is it better to say Aye instead of Yes when committing to something?
Apr
13
reviewed Leave Open Is term “Cruise” correct when you sail on sailboat?
Apr
13
reviewed Leave Open Can commensurate be used as a transitive verb?
Apr
13
comment Can commensurate be used as a transitive verb?
commensurate - corresponding in size or degree; in proportion. synonyms: equivalent, equal, corresponding, correspondent, comparable, proportionate, proportional. You might consider equalize (or perhaps normalize if you're using commensurate more loosely to mean "easily compared, having similar values in the same units of measure"). But OED has as definition 2 for the verb commensurate: (trans.) To make commensurate; to proportion; to make to correspond in nature.
Apr
13
awarded  Great Answer
Apr
13
reviewed Leave Open Meaning of “Busted” as an adjective
Apr
13
reviewed Leave Open Difference in “Adequate” and “Enough/sufficient”