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Feb
3
comment Kidspeak for animals
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's a "list-type" question
Feb
3
comment usage of “nasty”
Bear in mind that nasty is increasingly used as a sexually loaded term these days with the same connotations as wicked, filthy, dirty, kinky (often seen as desirable uninhibited sexual deviancy).
Feb
3
comment Is it right to use the word “quotation” in this case?
haha - you obviously don't need programming advice from me then! Personally I'd use quotation throughout (both as the contents of a passed parameter for formatted display, and the name of any class or object handling such transaction types). That would probably result in less "false positive" unwanted hits when you do global searches within your project files for the stuff you're interested in. Btw - it's usually for your perusal, not review.
Feb
3
comment Can Looney Chess Game be used as a title?
...I dunno if it's significant... NGrams shows BrE usage falling from its peak in recent decades, but no such drop-off in AmE
Feb
3
comment Can Looney Chess Game be used as a title?
@Dan: Well, OP here clearly has little knowledge of either of our "immediate associations" (Disney? comics?!). Interestingly, when I searched for loony offensive Google took it upon itself to assume the American spelling and show me hundreds of results for specific episodes of Looney Tunes that were either considered too offensive for public screening at the time, or have since become so due to changing standards (some are appallingly racist, for example). Still, I bet any money if Warner started such a series today, they'd avoid using the word looney (or they'd be taken to task).
Feb
3
comment Is it right to use the word “quotation” in this case?
...apart from any other considerations, you might want to use standard "templates" such as The %s was created successfully! (where %s is a "placeholder" replaced at runtime by some passed variable containing order, quote, refund, etc.). Software should definitely stick to using the same name every time for any given referent. But this is all "writing advice" - note that I have voted to close your question as "Primarily Opinion-based".
Feb
3
comment Is it right to use the word “quotation” in this case?
As those dictionary definitions make clear, they can be considered synonyms for this specific sense. In certain contexts it might be acceptable / desirable to actually use both synonymous words in the same text, but for your specific context I think it would be poor style. Choose one (it doesn't really matter which) and stick to it consistently.
Feb
3
comment Is it right to use the word “quotation” in this case?
From oxforddictionaries... quotation - A formal statement setting out the estimated cost for a particular job or service; quote - A quotation giving the estimated cost for a particular job or service.
Feb
3
comment Can Looney Chess Game be used as a title?
@Dan: Your profile (still?!) doesn't say, but I seem to recall you're US-based. I think loony as in loony bin = psychiatric hospital or Keith "Moon the Loon" Richards is primarily a BrE usage (that's definitely non-PC today), but in AmE I mostly only see it in the old Warner Bros Looney Tunes context. So perspectives probably differ across the pond.
Feb
3
comment Can Looney Chess Game be used as a title?
It's all a matter of opinion. Bear in mind that many people today would consider loony to be at the very least "non-PC", if not actually offensive.
Feb
3
comment Comma or semicolon after an independent clause ending in 'though'
Even using a semicolon looks a bit "literary". In practice I'm sure most people would just use a full stop. But it's just a stylistic choice, making the question itself POB.
Feb
3
comment Prefix for three-way logic
I'd say it's a tri-state variable. I've often used the three values +1, 0, -1 in theoretically "binary" configuration flags to mean set to ON, set to OFF, not (yet) explicitly set to anything (where I invariably #define'd the values as TRUE, FALSE, NOTFOUND, or later on used names like that in enum definitions).
Feb
3
comment What is the difference, if any, between these two sentences?
The biggest difference is that you'd probably only encounter #2 from a speaker of Indian English.
Feb
3
comment Is there a terminology for verbs describing the subject?
Stative verbs are verbs that express a state rather than an action. Is that what you're getting at?
Feb
3
comment What made the “worst case scenario” a popular expression?
I think it's worth noting that 2 out of 3 of the earliest (pre-1970) instances of worst-case projections have the "noun adjunct" usage worst-case in scare quotes, showing it was an emerging syntactic usage then (when simulations, say, were emerging semantically).
Feb
3
comment Is this text grammatically correct?
This is off topic proofreading. Yasu - it's ungrammatical because the subject of (singular) survives is the plural NP existing confidentiality obligations. Also because in respect of needs to be followed by a contextually meaningful noun phrase, and information the subject of such obligation isn't a valid NP (minimal change: information which is the subject of such obligation).
Feb
3
comment What made the “worst case scenario” a popular expression?
Josh61: That's the core of our disagreement. You're convinced that worst-case scenario is some kind of "coinage", implying it's meaningful to try and establish who first used it. I think it's just a natural collocation which only differs from future projection insofar as that one could have been used much earlier (which yours couldn't, until scenario itself became established). So the "origin" aspect of this Q seems misguided to me, and the question of why expressions like this have gained traction is more about social / technological trends than the English language as such.
Feb
3
comment How to find a single word for a long description?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's a request for resources
Feb
3
comment What made the “worst case scenario” a popular expression?
@Mari-Lou: It's much the same with, say, future projections. Obviously, after the Bomb, the missile crisis, and increasing concerns about overpopulation and planetary resource depletion (also reflected in the rise of Sci-Fi), people were much more likely to refer to "possible future outcomes for humanity".
Feb
3
comment What made the “worst case scenario” a popular expression?
Josh61: I see no justification for claiming that adjectival best-case [outcome, scenario, etc.] "clearly derives" from worst-case. Google Books suggests they both started to gain traction in the 70s, when presumably more and more people started to talk about a best/worst case possibility rather than simply the best/worst possibility (I'm guessing this was also when it became idiomatic to refer to a case-scenario analysis, for example).