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2d
comment What is this type of idiom called: “I know he's not the smartest person in the world, but…”
If you're into Lit Crit terminology, it's litotes. If you're an ordinary native speaker, it's understatement. I'm both, so my choice of term would depend on who I'm talking to.
2d
answered Origin of “If X, you are in the wrong place”
2d
answered Word/phrase that can be used to say that a particular word doesn't describe something
Jun
30
comment a word for a person who never attains a desire or goal
Does it make any difference whether the goal isn't achieved because the "unsatisfied aspirant" simply doesn't have the ability to succeed (i.e. - is "unrealistic"), as opposed to because he doesn't make the necessary effort (i.e. - is "lazy")?
Jun
30
comment so angry / as angry as he is
possible duplicate of “so long as” vs. “as long as”‌​. Also “as far as” vs. “so far as” vs. “in so far as” and “As did I” vs “So did I”
Jun
30
comment A while ago and a few minutes ago
+1 - I think you're absolutely right. Unless explicitly qualified as a short while ago, the most common implication is some [contextually significant amount of] time before the present. As opposed to recent, which normally means some [contextually insignificant amount of] time before the present. My upvote is primarily for not falling into the trap of trying to specify any particular clock/calendar duration, since context is all.
Jun
30
comment are there any compiled lists of modern equivalents of historical proverbs?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is a request for resources
Jun
30
comment What's an adjective for “pertaining to donkeys”?
I don't think anyone uses assine. Is that a typo for asinine?
Jun
29
comment What do you call a unit of information?
I think whatever word you settle on, your about isn't likely to sit well with it. But you're inherently in a "technical jargon" context, since you're talking about computers and encoding information within programs. Ordinary non-computer-literate people don't normally think in terms of encoding discrete "items" of "information" like that.
Jun
29
comment What do you call a unit of information?
The fundamental unit is a bit, but in your context datum (or perhaps metric) is more suitable.
Jun
29
comment Repeated usage of “can”
@Christoph: Although I haven't actually voted to close (or migrate), I think questions like this should be answered on English Language Learners, not here on ELU. As to up- or downgraded, I think it looks and sounds a bit awkward, but that's entirely a matter of opinion.
Jun
29
comment What is the meaning of “ Milk doesn't sit with me well”?
Idiomatically it's almost always sit well with me (1130 hits in Google Books), not sit with me well (36 hits). A very common alternative for food/drink your body reacts against is doesn't agree with me.
Jun
29
comment Repeated usage of “can”
Arrrrgh! That it be, young Barmar-me-lad! :)
Jun
29
comment Using to + gerund and to + invinitive
It's not enough that school and watching the movie are both nouns. The "locative" preposition to requires that it be followed by a referent that you can treat as a (literal or figurative) location (or "final state", as in idiomatic got to pot, go to seed, go to pieces).
Jun
29
comment “when it's snowing and when it isn't” vs “when it's snowing and when it isn't snowing”
@DesAdams: Lordy lord! That must be another previously-unrecognised US/UK distinction. We Brits tend to avoid discussing seasonal variation in our puppy-eating predilections. :)
Jun
29
comment What english dictionary google translate use?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about online resources and TEFL strategies, not English language and usage as covered by ELU.
Jun
29
comment Repeated usage of “can”
If you're going to delete [can] before changed, you should also delete be, otherwise it just sounds like some weird subjunctive usage (which it ain't :).
Jun
29
comment Although >>> In spite of + Subject + present participle
Your in spite of examples are credible, but in practice native speakers would normally say despite trying hard. Or to avoid the slightly awkward gerund, despite his efforts or similar.
Jun
28
comment When quoting, what's the difference between “someone says” and “as someone says”?
Of course. Context is everything. (And let's face it - with a bit of contrivance, context can also be almost anything! :)
Jun
28
comment I noticed vs I have noticed
That's often true, but it's probably just an inevitable corollary of the fact that present perfect implies a connection to the present (so the time-frame during which the noticing takes/took place extends from the past to the present). So you quite reasonably could say During my ten years working for X, I noticed that mistakes were often covered up, just as you could say Since I got up this morning I have noticed that my eyesight seems a bit blurry. It's really a matter of relevance to the present moment.