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reviewed Close How can I say this in other words?
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comment “Everyone, put your dice in the middle”
Note that many (possibly even most) native speakers just use dice for the singular as well as the plural - as shown by the number of written instances of a loaded dice, a weighted dice, a crooked dice, etc. Personally I think die is a little "precious" (sense 4).
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awarded  Nice Answer
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comment Can I use ellipsis this way?
@usage: I'm sure there are contexts where repeated elements can't (or shouldn't be) deleted, but yours certainly isn't one of them. And off-hand I don't know if it would be meaningful to identify "rules" regarding the contexts where you should avoid it. In my example I "deleted" quite a lot of words. But although I could have retained some, it would be idiomatically a bit odd to reduce it to "I'm going to quit smoking, but I'm not going to yet", for instance.
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comment Can I use ellipsis this way?
Why do you think there might be a problem? It's no different to, say, "I'm going to quit smoking, but not yet"
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comment What is the possessive form of blocked?
This answer doesn't actually address OP's question. It's just (related) writing advice, which would have been better posted as a comment.
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comment 'The picture hung crooked on the wall'
@Edwin: I don't know what the "adverbial" form of still might be (perhaps I should say I still don't know! :) but a more clear-cut illustration might be to contrast She stood naked with ?She stood nakedly.
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comment Antonym of anthropomorphic
Or dehumanization to treat (someone) as though he or she is not a human being. That's also as defined by M-W, Unfortunately, the related derivative objectivism has a significantly different meaning, and I'm not convinced there even are derived -ic forms for either, or an -ism relating to dehumanization.
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comment How can I make this sentence unambiguous?
@jxh: oic. Obviously it's true that the attributive compound adjective discussion-provoking is nowhere near as common as thought-provoking, but I did specifically address that point when explaining why I would not reverse the two components in a repetitive construction involving "deletion". Anyway, this is ELU, not ELL. I assume OP is well aware of the massive difference in "idiomatic prevalence" for the two terms, and that that's why he chose to put them that way round in the first place (though he may not have been consciously aware of the exact principle guiding his choice).
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comment How can I make this sentence unambiguous?
@jxh: But I didn't "invent" that either! Grammatically, I'd say the hyphen is actually required in OP's context (given that he's explained exactly what he wants the text to mean). All I did there was correct the punctuation for that two-word term so it complies with standard orthographic principles in written English.
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comment How can I make this sentence unambiguous?
@alephzero: That's a very good point. Changing thought to thoughtful provides a completely unambiguous way of conveying what I assume is OP's intended meaning, that easily works in speech as well. But on the downside, OP did want a "punctuation-only" solution if possible, and even a "non-pedant" such as myself would normally expect to see discussion-provoking hyphenated when used adjectivally before a noun.
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comment How can I make this sentence unambiguous?
Fair enough. I hadn't really registered OP's point before the sample text (or if necessary, reword). I was just noting the stuff after the example.
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revised How can I make this sentence unambiguous?
added 1 character in body
Aug
24
revised How can I make this sentence unambiguous?
added 459 characters in body
Aug
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comment Reporting a questions in past tense where the wh- clause replaces the subject
Arguably, He asked who had done that, since the "doing" obviously predates the "asking".
Aug
24
comment does the word PERSONS exist? Should I only use it for singular? PERSON
Have you never encountered the legal usage ...by a person or persons unknown? This is a dup of Person, Persons, People, Peoples, but I've run out of closevotes today.
Aug
24
reviewed Close Why should I use “I have” instead of “I has”?
Aug
24
comment How can I make this sentence unambiguous?
-1 because OP specifically says he would like to leave it as is, and just punctuate it if possible. By implication, he doesn't want to rearrange the order (so for effectively the same reason I think @jxh has addressed a question that wasn't actually asked).
Aug
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comment How can I make this sentence unambiguous?
@John: Point taken, ty! I'm afraid I was just trying things on for size using the "voice in my head" - which apparently is better at exaggerated pauses and stress. It's only when you "spell it out" with the assistance of capitalization forcing the stress to be elsewhere AND wordsrunningtogether that I see (hear? :) how you do it!
Aug
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comment But other things being equal, it is better for society that the girl is educated than that she remain/remains ignorant
In the Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (1994), Chalker and Weiner note that the mandative subjunctive "has made a considerable comeback in British English in recent years, probably under American influence." I'd have thought this is fairly basic grammar, more appropriate on English Language Learners.