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8h
comment Sound from vibrating cell phone
@aparente001: OED's first citation is GB Shaw (Irish). The second is from Punch (quintessentially British, I'd say), and the third is E Bowen Death of Hearts (Anglo-Irish). They're all before my time, but buzz = [telephone] call has been familiar to me since the 70s in BrE.
8h
comment “However” or “Though”?
@jo99blackops: But but would work perfectly well in the initial position in your example, a somewhat "daisy-chained" syntactic structure that while potentially interesting might be improved by a little refactoring, which is not that difficult to do.
8h
comment Is “He is being here” ever acceptable?
He's a great mimic - he can take off anyone! I usually recognise who, if it's a famous person, but I don't know who he is being here.
9h
comment Meaning of smileys
@fabrice: Nobody says SE have to provide a home for every question anyone could ask. Admittedly, smileys are symbols, so they have some connection to language. But they don't have any grammar (usually! :) so they're not really that different to a dab of perfume on a love-letter. And a question asking which perfume would best convey some particular message would also be Off Topic.
10h
comment What tense do you use to refer to an adult's childhood as a child prodigy?
@Dan: Not my finest hour, I admit. But all the other famous ones that came to mind were dead long before the Internet, so it wouldn't mean much. All these typos - are you staking a claim to my handle when I shuffle off this mortal coil? (Or just saving up for a full-size bluetooth keyboard for your handheld? :)
10h
comment What tense do you use to refer to an adult's childhood as a child prodigy?
@Dan: Shirley Temple is prodigy??
10h
comment What tense do you use to refer to an adult's childhood as a child prodigy?
Shirley Temple was a child prodigy gets 8 hits on Google, but the same quoted string with is gets no hits at all. Okay, at least 2 of the 8 are after she died last year, but it's still strong evidence of what form is used.
11h
comment “abundant” and “copious” are synonyms - undisputed?
It's also abundantly clear there are many context where these two words and their derivatives are not interchangeable. Everything else is just based on Yeah, well they're the same when they mean the same.
11h
comment “abundant” and “copious” are synonyms - undisputed?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's just an invitation to discussion - mainly, of the loosely- and variously-defined term "synonym".
13h
comment Do proper adverbs fall out of usage in current spoken American English?
You've got it wrong. Or you've wrongly understood the way adverbs and adjectives can be used.
15h
comment What “degrees” of consideration are there?
Offhand, the only "weakening" modifiers I can think of are the colloquial/slangy vaguely considering and perhaps kinda considering. Stretching a point, maybe idly considering.
15h
reviewed Leave Open The difference between 'I love him' and 'I am in love with him'
15h
reviewed Leave Open “Listen to music” vs. “listen to the music”
15h
comment Two flights delay? or two flight delays?
It's the same as if you wanted one bread roll for yourself, and another for your friend. You'd ask for two bread rolls, not two breads roll. But as @Dan says, this is at best an ELL question.
15h
comment Which phrase is grammatically correct?
Neither. You're much more likely to work to a tight schedule
15h
comment care for minors / care of minors / guardianship of minors
Possibly guardianship of might not seem so bad in a formal legal context, but in general you should stick to care of (or caring for, depending on the exact context/stylistic choice).
16h
comment Countable nouns in the list of ingredients
@Edwin: It's not exactly a "personal preference". For example, Google Books has 16 instances of grams of pumpkin, but none at all of the pluralised grams of pumpkins
16h
comment Countable nouns in the list of ingredients
Because your quantities are all much smaller than a typical individual vegetable of each type, it would be probably be better to use the "mass noun" singular forms.
16h
comment What does “nimble-witted” mean?
Nimble-witted, sharp-witted, quick-witted. This is General Reference.
18h
comment Some or more of something
You've misunderstood this use of some. It means about, and tacking on or more doesn't alter the fact that 48 yards, for example, could still be referred to as some 50 or more yards.