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7h
reviewed Leave Open Using “a” or “the”?
7h
reviewed Leave Open Word or phrase for someone accepting a story completely & unquestioningly
7h
reviewed Close What does “why” mean in this sentence?
7h
comment “If you put in the work to sharpen the steel, it will eventually turn into needles”; Do you have a similar proverb in English?
Slow and steady wins the race, Many a mickle makes a muckle, and ( Ralph Waldo Emerson) Patience and fortitude conquer all things
8h
comment Is “whomnot” a valid word, and if not, what is a valid alternative?
@ewormuth: Or whomever. As in There's just you and my daughter, and whomever. Not whomever, just you and my daughter. Sounds fine to me. Personally, I understand whatnot as "short" for whatever not?, where the negation is optional anyway. But since no-one else does the same with who[m]not, I wouldn't feel comfortable being the only one.
11h
comment Grammatical process in which an actor is derived from a verb
@Janus: I did make a mistake on that first link about - it goes to the SO Linguistics question, but I intended to link to this specific answer by user fenceop, where he says it's not clear whether you are looking for an existing tool that returns actantial nouns or trying to build your own. Do the links in this comment not work either? Perhaps I need to use Google Chrome's "incognito" mode, to avoid the fact of my being a registered user affecting the form of link I get.
11h
comment Employee vs Employe Which Is More Correct/Common
...note that you really should have included those definitions in the original question, rather than saving them to be brandished "in defence" after the fully-expected WTF? reaction.
11h
comment Employee vs Employe Which Is More Correct/Common
OED make no mention of it being dated, obsolete, archaic, or whatever. And their two most recent citations are 1979 & 2006 - they don't normally include such recent usages for words which have declined significantly over time. My guess it was always "rare", but has stubbornly refused to curl up and die.
12h
comment Employee vs Employe Which Is More Correct/Common
@linuxdan: Yes, I think dictionary.reference is a perfectly credible source. So far as I can see, all its content is culled from "established" dictionaries (though they do claim to have their own team of experienced lexicographers. I was surprised to see that entry, but consulting the full OED I find it is indeed listed. As a North American usage, with the caveat that Employee is far more common in contemporary use, but employe is the preferred spelling in certain publications.
12h
comment Employee vs Employe Which Is More Correct/Common
Can you cite any evidence that Employe even has any currency (let alone credibility)?
12h
comment Can you contract the main verb in a sentence?
@Robusto: I have reservations. Firstly because in my understanding you're an AmE speaker - so according to what nohat says, you should have a problem with your contraction there. But secondly because (BrE or not), I've got serious objections to the idea of contracting the verb in my first sentence here.
12h
comment What is an “IT” person called who isn't a manager?
What is a "Healthcare" person called who isn't a manager? Or an "Education" or "Civil Defence" person? In such vast fields, I don't think there are ever likely to be single words covering all other workers apart from "managers".
12h
comment What does “even so” mean in the following passage?
Jacinto - Now you've supplied more context for the first one, it seems pretty clear @DJClayworth is right that essentially it could be replaced by That's true. Although I would add that I think the usage always implies something like Although what you said is true, I have something more to add which appears to be contradictory (i.e. - what some of us might call a "Yeah, but" type of response).
13h
comment Grammatical process in which an actor is derived from a verb
Ah, right! I never even thought to specifically search for that. But I hope you found something of interest in the Linguistics question. I'm not saying your question is "Off Topic" here, but I'd have thought it's at least as on topic there as here. So if you have more questions in a similar vein you might like to consider asking there (the site is in "beta", but it can't "graduate" unless more people use it).
13h
comment Weekly meetings vs weekly meeting
@ewormuth: Or change discussed to talked, which allows about to be retained. I don't really see any reason to favour in which over where in this exact context.
13h
comment Grammatical process in which an actor is derived from a verb
If this answer on SO Linguistics is anything to go by, they might be called actantial nouns. But actantial isn't in OED, and as that second link shows, it doesn't (yet?) have much currency. I don't know formal terminology, but I'd just call them verb-derived "agent" nouns.
13h
comment Need another way to say “as is”
Warts and all is common, if "colloquial".
13h
comment word for a person who achieves the impossible
Miracle-worker is pretty common in this context.
13h
comment Should've [came] vs [come]
The past participle of the (irregular) verb to come is come.
16h
comment What does “even so” mean in the following passage?
I'm not sure about the first one (haven't bothered to search for the full context), but the second one is akin to if someone agreed with my comment here, and posted a comment underneath it starting with the one-word "sentence" Indeed. That's to say, what Little Tobrah means to convey is an emphatic Even though you might not believe it, what you said is so true. It's a bit dated/archaic/poetic - today she's probably say Absolutely! or similar.