Reputation
100,486
Next tag badge:
394/400 score
107/80 answers
Badges
23 178 332
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~11.9m people reached

12h
comment since I did something vs since I have done something
I think this belongs on English Language Learners. Anabel - have a look at “My wife and I have been living here since we have been married.” is the tense correct? over there.
12h
comment Is “technical possible (to do something)” the same as “technically possible”?
I see two people have voted to migrate this to English Language Learners. But I would closevote it there for the same reason I have here - no evidence of prior research by the OP.
14h
comment Would the cell theory be capitalized?
It's never capitalized in the relevant Wikipedia article (except where those are the first two words in a sentence, in which case only Cell is capitalized anyway). So I think this could easily have been established with minimal research.
15h
comment How to say “libro parlato” in English
@Jack: I suspect anything like that would be quite labour-intensive (software wouldn't reliably identify the exact position in the text, and unavoidably sometimes the human reader would say something that didn't exactly match the text anyway). Bear in mind the primary / original purpose of audiobooks is / was to give blind people independent access to texts, (which naturally gets funded by charities and the State). But you're presumably thinking in terms of a study aid for people trying to learn English, which is far less likely to be funded like that.
15h
comment What does 'their' refer to here?
I don't think tinkering with additional features like because, had and a comma have any real bearing on the ambiguity.
15h
answered How to say “libro parlato” in English
16h
comment English Grammar
I suppose technically speaking, We're having a party tonight is the same as I'm going to London tonight. But somehow the precise syntactic relationships seem not to be the same if I compare We have a party tonight with I go to London tonight (the former seems like a perfectly ordinary way of reminding your partner to pick up some beer on the way home from work; the latter just sounds klunky, formal, and dated).
16h
revised Origin of the exclamation “Jeannie (Genie?) Martins”
edited tags
16h
comment Origin of the exclamation “Jeannie (Genie?) Martins”
It's just a "minced oath" (euphemistically avoiding the potentially sacrilegious exclamatory Jesus!). This particular one certainly isn't as common as, say Cheese and biscuits! (or Gordon Bennet! for God!).
18h
comment Up in Annie's room behind the wall paper
There's more discussion about the etymology here, but I don't think it really adds anything to what you fished out from Word Detective. The important thing seems to be that behind the clock is a later embellishment, and OP's behind the wallpaper is just a really whimsical "final flourish".
18h
comment A single word to describe a young, successful team or organization
I'm not too sure how well they'd fit with something like a football team, but a well-established pairing for commercial products is traditional / innovative.
18h
comment Word choice for a comparison of different amounts
You probably need to write a much longer explanation of exactly what you're counting, and why. On the face of it, any output from your counting process is going to be dominated by cases where the count is zero for either or both articles (which are unlikely to be of any interest in any context I can think of).
18h
comment Word choice for a comparison of different amounts
That's implicit in your original text, but you haven't answered my question. Do you have an exhaustive list of all possible animals, some of which may not appear in either article - and will therefore be reported as having equal occurrence counts (total "zero" for each article). Or are you going through each article looking for animals, and only then comparing the occurrence counts for that animal in each article? That dictates whether in my suggested rephrasing you say that occurs in both articles, or that occurs in either article.
18h
comment Word choice for a comparison of different amounts
Do you actually count animals that only occur in one article but not the other? What about the (almost infinite number of) animals that don't occur in either article? Perhaps you'd be better saying For each animal that occurs in both articles, we count how often it occurs more in one than the other.
18h
comment Up in Annie's room behind the wall paper
(My gut feel is it's originally Irish.)
19h
comment Up in Annie's room behind the wall paper
...fifty years ago in my family we used to say something of unknown location might be in a matchbox in God's handbag. I've no idea whether one of us made that one up, or we got it from some outside source.
19h
comment Up in Annie's room behind the wall paper
The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English has up in Nelly's room behind the wallpaper, but this source seems to be saying Partridge originally listed it as Annie's room. Not that it makes much difference.
19h
comment What is the plural of the name Jess?
Your last example Both Jesses's cats are playing with the Jesses's dogs is simply wrong. As this NGram shows, if the relevant noun already ends with two separate s sounds, and you need to add another for the Saxon genitive (which wouldn't normally be pronounced anyway), you only write the apostrophe, not the extra s.
19h
comment “To come undone”
@deadrat: If it hadn't been Duran Duran, I'd have taken it for granted that crime deliberately alluded to doing something "naughty, wicked" (in the erotic sense), so what comes undone would suggest buttons and zips being unfastened while getting down and dirty. But I think that's perhaps unlikely from Princess Di's favourite boy band.
19h
revised The use of “that of” and an apostrophe
edited tags