88,618 reputation
16148296
bio website english.stackexchange.com/…
location United Kingdom
age 61
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen 11 hours ago

I did my degree in English/French Language/Linguistics back in the '70s, but I only got a middling grade, and I've worked in software development ever since, so I'm really only an expert on English language in the same way any articulate native speaker is.

To save the trouble of repeatedly doing it on individual posts, I'll just say here that I don't come to EL&U looking for arguments. If I come across as contentious that will nearly always be inadvertent carelessness on my part.

Anyway - if you have been, thanks for reading.


11h
comment Phrase “In my spare time”
...having said that, "I will work on your project as time permits" is probably one of the least "dismissive" ways to put it.
11h
comment Phrase “In my spare time”
What @Jim said. Besides which, in my experience some customers think you can't be working hard enough if you even admit to having any "spare time". In any event, it's not really "professional" to offer to do any work outside your normal paid activities.
12h
comment “predicted at” vs “predicted for”
Predicted simply isn't the right word in this context. You could use expected at or scheduled for.
13h
comment For statements using the following words/phrases
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's "homework". (And as @Peter says, bad homework at that.)
13h
comment How to ask a question to interviewer
@Prithviraj: The reason I posted that comment was to give you a chance to edit the question. If you don't, this question is certain to be closed (but someone will probably suggest a better phrasing in a comment anyway).
13h
comment Plural Noun--Its vs Their
possible duplicate of Company names, use of "have" and "has"
13h
comment When do words like “Rewirable” keep the 'e' from “Rewire”?
Related: Is 'useable' preferred in certain regions, or just an alternate spelling of 'usable'? I don't see much difference between AmE and BrE here
13h
comment How to ask a question to interviewer
As our FAQ says please, don’t ask any questions about Proofreading ("are there any mistakes?"), unless the source of concern is clearly specified
15h
comment Is it correct to use the phrase - “he / she fights on”?
I assume this "fighting" is effectively metaphoric (he/she isn't literally engaging in combat). Sometimes if you want to add a stronger nuance that the struggle is arduous and/or protracted and/or may never end successfully, you might be better using (also figurative) soldier, battle, etc. as the verb.
15h
comment what's the difference between “important to” and “important for”?
"It's important for him to like me" would usually be taken as meaning it matters to me that he should like me. But "It's important to him to like me" can only ever mean he cares a lot or has a lot to gain by liking me.
15h
comment Is there a concise word or phrase for making something dynamic?
@Kevin: That's probably not a "programming-specific" usage. The clients probably just mean "Make it more interesting (including eye-catching moving graphics, etc.)"
15h
comment Is there a concise word or phrase for making something dynamic?
@Kevin: I'd hardly say that. In programming/UI contexts, dynamic almost always has the specific sense of being created at time of use, often incorporating specific pre-existing contextual information and/or capable of interactively responding to changed context (such as user input).
16h
comment Is there a concise word or phrase for making something dynamic?
@Matt: No - animate doesn't work for your context either. You can have a non-interactive non-context-sensitive web page that happens to include animated graphics, for example. I'm not convinced there is an English verb for the action you're trying to describe. If I were you I'd just stick with standard compound expressions such as "I want to make [these web pages] dynamic", or make them interactive, or make them context-sensitive, etc.
16h
comment Is there a concise word or phrase for making something dynamic?
@Matt: No - dynamize isn't at all appropriate for your context. As Hellion says, it means to endow with energy/force/dynamism, whereas what you want is a word meaning make interactive/context-sensitive.
17h
comment Mars orbits Sun
@Christian: I'm not sure we currently have any definitive way of establishing that any given star doesn't have planets. The more closely we look, the more exoplanets we discover, and it seems to me quite possible that [almost] all stars have planets. Certainly not everyone would reserve "sun" for stars with known planets.
20h
comment Does this make sense “Santa just isn't”
@Hot Licks: Maybe "obscure" wasn't the best choice there. I meant syntactically "unusual", in that although there are a few oft-quoted examples, we rarely extend the usage into other contexts. And as for contractions, I suggest most people wouldn't even recognise the utterance "Santa's" as an attempt to assert "Santa exists"
20h
comment Should directories be named in singular or plural?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about a filing system naming convention, not "use of English" as such.
20h
comment Does this make sense “Santa just isn't”
What Gorgias has done is to consider what is and what is not as "it"'s, as things that are on a par with the particular things we say exist. Apart from obscure contexts like that, native speakers rarely use to be to mean to exist. And if we do, we wouldn't normally use a negating contraction like isn't.
20h
comment What do you call this “Rain rains”
But does Google google?
20h
comment What do you call this “Rain rains”
Cooks cook [food], pens pen [livestock], fingers finger [private parts], lights light [dark areas], clothes clothe [people], etc.