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16h
comment “Thought of” vs. “thought about”. What's the difference?
@Edwin: I didn't. But basic questions like this are always turning up on ELU - and since I think they should be on ELL anyway, I usually do a "site-specific" Google search when I see something so trivial here. The search site:english.stackexchange.com "think of" "think about" finds three such questions, and "thought of" "thought about" finds another one. But they'd be hard to find using the built-in SE search facility, since it ignores little words like of.
16h
comment word for a person who has shared similar experiences?
possible duplicate of Synonym for "Fellow Sufferers"?
17h
comment Prepositions before and after percentages
@Denis: I don't think you can flag up there as "optional" in this context. It would never be acceptable to write while only 26.16% of cases is a child.
17h
comment Prepositions before and after percentages
Note that Anglophones almost always use a period (not comma) to indicate a decimal point.
17h
revised Prepositions before and after percentages
added 36 characters in body
17h
comment “Thought of” vs. “thought about”. What's the difference?
possible duplicate of Difference between "think of" and "think about" But more appropriately, it's also been covered on English Language Learners by “Think of” versus “think about”
1d
comment “Would have been given, I shall”; is it a valid construction?
No, I don't think there's any "future" equivalent to participle clauses like Being a learner, I needed to ask. You'd need to use something like Once [If/When] I am given it, I will be ready to [blah blah]. But I think this question belongs on English Language Learners
1d
awarded  Notable Question
1d
revised Do we need a comma to separate these two sentences?
added 3 characters in body
1d
comment Past Perfect And Present Perfect In One Sentence
possible duplicate of How do the tenses and aspects in English correspond temporally to one another?
1d
comment Use of Present Perfect
possible duplicate of How do the tenses and aspects in English correspond temporally to one another?
1d
comment How to form possessive from “belongs to X (preposition) Y”
The possessive apostrophe comes after the noun (or noun phrase), but because it's an awkward construction we'd normally avoid a long noun phrase's and use of a long noun phrase. Also, we rarely use of us - it's our.
1d
comment Is the following ungrammatical expression common in speech?
@Edwin: Usually, but not always. (For example, I would of voted "ungrammatical" if we were talking about this current sentence! :)
1d
comment Is the following ungrammatical expression common in speech?
Yes, it's common. So common, in fact, that it would be excessive to call it "ungrammatical", or a "mistake".
1d
comment “I, (any name), am here to… ” is this correct?
+1 for "sounds quite formal". But I think it's totally inappropriate in OP's context, no matter how formal the occasion. To me, even if it's not actually a sworn oath, whatever follows I, [my name], has to be some kind of "momentous declaration", in the context of which the identity of the speaker must be significant. Either because "I" am already known to be important to the speech topic, or because it's some kind of "performative" speech act (such as I, Fumbles, do hereby solemnly swear [blah blah]).
1d
comment Is this sentence correct in the aspect of grammar?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's proofreading and it's a duplicate. Vipin - the idiomatically standard form is ... at an all-time high.
2d
comment legal contract meaning
What @Dan said. Not to mention which what we've got here looks like just a verbose and clumsily-worded dependent clause without even the context of a full sentence. But I expect what it means is that if the Stock File is used "internally" (but can't be directly accessed by users), the work that uses it will be classed as "derivative" for the purposes of surrounding text in the agreement.
2d
comment Position of interrogative auxiliary verbs as replies to statements
Syntactically, the inverted verb+subject word order invariably denotes a question. But probably any statement (using standard subject+verb order) can be presented as a question simply by intonation. I think any difference in nuance (which I don't see at all in OP's context) is purely a matter of opinion, and would not be generally or consistently recognised.
2d
comment Is the lowercase pronoun “i” a feature of Indian English?
@Mari-Lou: From your own link, The most vocal demands for English teaching now come from India's most disadvantaged communities. Given the nature of Indian culture, I expect those "disadvantaged" communities will continue to be looked down on for at least another couple of generations by "better-educated" sectors of the population, who will probably continue to ascribe high status to "Standard English". I can't honestly see "Indian pidgin English" playing a prominent role in what's heading to be the global standard lingua franca.
2d
comment Can “abscond” be used as a transitive verb?
OED says the two transitive usages are "rare". My guess would be your last two examples are at the very least influenced by abducted. Particularly the second, where arguably it's a simple mistake, but I suspect that semantically there may be sound reasons for the choice in the context of the Child Agency (you wouldn't normally abduct your own children, but it seems fine to abscond [with] them).