Reputation
93,070
Next tag badge:
367/400 score
105/80 answers
Badges
20 163 305
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~8.7m people reached

10h
comment What is a blanket term for a legal system based on evangelical Christian law?
Most "Evangelicals" are American, and so far as I know it's enshrined in the US constitution that religious concerns must be kept separate from judicial and governmental systems.
10h
comment Spelling of somber or sombre
At least “Center” or “centre” in sports vocabulary? had the merit of suggesting the spelling might vary in a sports context. But even that was closed in favour of the more generic Similar words that change from “-ter” to “tre”. Either consult your dictionary/style guide of choice, or go for the straightforward -er = US, -re = UK distinction.
10h
comment Difference between “have” and “have been”?
I disagree. "I have worked here since two years ago" is not "continuous". That would be "I have been working here since two years ago". It's potentially misleading/confusing to introduce the semantic aspect of stretching/continuing into the present moment when that term has such a specific grammatical sense.
10h
comment Difference between “have” and “have been”?
Yes, but as @Margana correctly points out, it's far more natural to reference the timeframe of an "activity" lasting from some point in the past right up to the present moment by saying you've been doing/done it for [X amount of time] (you extrapolate the time when it started by going "back" X years from now). As opposed to saying I did it from when I was a child to/until [some later point in time, before now].
14h
comment Difference between “have” and “have been”?
I have been helping him implies both "continuing" action and that you're still helping at time of speaking. It's the continuous verb form that distinguished this from past perfect I have helped him (perhaps only once, briefly, long ago). You can in principle override the "not linked to the present moment" implications by saying I have helped him since we were children, but in reality most people would probably supplement the unavoidable implication of since by saying I have been helping him since [the year dot, or whatever.
14h
comment Is it common to use “perverted” (as in a pervert) as an adjective?
@DRF: Again - of course. That's why I've closevoted as "Primarily Opinion-based". I'm not sure you and I actually have different opinions about this one, but if we don't know exactly what OP himself wishes to imply (about the plan), we don't even know which of our (possibly multiple) opinions to promote.
14h
comment Is it common to use “perverted” (as in a pervert) as an adjective?
@DRF: Of course. But as an example, it does seem to stretch the meaning of perverted for most likely contexts - where I think it would be more natural for most people to say ...you had a game plan (that plan being to have "normal" sex with the speaker, probably nothing particularly kinky).
14h
comment What do you call someone who is favored by a higher authority?
I remember talking to a guy many years ago about the fact that he was one of half-a-dozen "acknowledged proteges" within a big multinational, all being "groomed" for a single senior position that only one of them would be likely to occupy (in 2-3 decades time, if ever). In his opinion, others within the organisation would inevitably refer to his status "disparagingly" anyway. But he considered it part of his job to both learn how to deal with that in his own mind and to reduce it (by becoming respected and/or liked), so that he'd be successful if he ever got that top slot.
14h
comment What is this type of idiom called: “I know he's not the smartest person in the world, but…”
Actually, it's only when your ping made me come back to this one that I've realized many/most (all?) euphemistic usages are effectively a type of understatement. So although I stand by my first comment, I'm cancelling my downvote.
15h
comment Is it common to use “perverted” (as in a pervert) as an adjective?
Your first example strikes me as slightly odd. Many people (particularly, women) might think that some other people (often men) are excessively "pushy" in trying to set up situations where they get to have sex. But whereas booking yourself and your holiday/travelling companion into a single hotel room might be described as overly presumptive (or optimistic! :), I'd hardly say that's perverted behaviour. To many people, in many situations, it's just par for the course. (Asking Room Service to bring you whips and chains is a different matter, obviously! )
15h
comment When to use indefinite article before “independence”?
Obviously. To be "independent" can cover a huge range of possibilities, even when restricted to the context of children growing up. An independent child might be one who makes up his own mind what he wants to eat, one who can tie his own shoelaces or use the toilet unaided, for example. Or maybe he still lives at home with his parents, but is financially independent in the sense that he has a job and can pay his own way in life. Why do you think there should only be one exact meaning for a word like that?
15h
comment When to use indefinite article before “independence”?
It largely depends on the exact context. If you refer to an independence, you might be implying there are other types of "independence" besides the specific one you're talking about. The independence that causes many two-year-olds to go through a "tantrum" phase isn't the same as the one that causes adolescents to challenge their parents as they make the transition from child to adult, for example.
15h
comment On the referent of 'during that time' / 'meanwhile'
There are plenty of written usages along the lines of {It only lasted} for a few seconds, but during that time {something else happened}. I think this question shows no evidence of prior research that might lead anyone to suppose such usages are remotely questionable. There are also plenty of billion years, during which time, going the other way.
15h
comment What is this type of idiom called: “I know he's not the smartest person in the world, but…”
I'd hardly call it "euphemistic" to tell someone they're not the sharpest tool in the box, or similar. Biting sarcasm, more like.
15h
comment What is this type of idiom called: “I know he's not the smartest person in the world, but…”
If you're into Lit Crit terminology, it's litotes. If you're an ordinary native speaker, it's understatement. I'm both, so my choice of term would depend on who I'm talking to.
16h
answered Origin of “If X, you are in the wrong place”
16h
answered Word/phrase that can be used to say that a particular word doesn't describe something
1d
comment a word for a person who never attains a desire or goal
Does it make any difference whether the goal isn't achieved because the "unsatisfied aspirant" simply doesn't have the ability to succeed (i.e. - is "unrealistic"), as opposed to because he doesn't make the necessary effort (i.e. - is "lazy")?
1d
comment so angry / as angry as he is
possible duplicate of “so long as” vs. “as long as”‌​. Also “as far as” vs. “so far as” vs. “in so far as” and “As did I” vs “So did I”
1d
comment A while ago and a few minutes ago
+1 - I think you're absolutely right. Unless explicitly qualified as a short while ago, the most common implication is some [contextually significant amount of] time before the present. As opposed to recent, which normally means some [contextually insignificant amount of] time before the present. My upvote is primarily for not falling into the trap of trying to specify any particular clock/calendar duration, since context is all.