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seen Jul 26 at 17:32

Jul
25
reviewed Edit suggested edit on Does the expression, “As sound as a pound” still holds its currency?
Jul
25
revised Does the expression, “As sound as a pound” still holds its currency?
added citation, fixed broken link.
Jul
19
answered Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
Jul
19
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
Boo! This analysis would seem to imply that gay men are inhuman. Even stripped of its evolutionary/gender direction claims, asexual people would be left inhuman.
Jul
19
comment What is the correct verb to imply the move of a moveable bridge?
Or, "when will the bridge (next) be in (or out) of road service/maritime service?"
Jul
19
comment “help someone convince” vs “help someone to be convinced”?
Yes. Also, the 'to' here is optional.
Jul
19
comment Ideally, how old would the company you work for be?
Sorry, "for which you work" sounds unnatural. As Winston Churchill mockingly said, "this is the kind of arrant pedantry up with which I will not put!"
Jul
19
answered Do two sentences below have the same meaning?
Jul
10
comment Is there an American English dialect that sounds as “distingushed” as British English?
Mentioning politicians in discussions like may be a little counterproductive since politicians have a constant populist incentive to not adopt a prestige accent but to keep or adopt the speech of the social classes they are trying to identify with.
Jul
10
answered Is there an American English dialect that sounds as “distingushed” as British English?
Jul
10
comment What do you call it when the video is not smooth?
Jitter would seem to be used predominantly in stochastic variation about an ideal mean value. Here we're talking about degradation in one direction, since the 'normal' value is some ceiling level of smoothness (depending on compression scheme used, etc.)
Jul
10
comment Are the phrases “both in water and land” and “for the loss and damage to” grammatical?
@Peter Shor - any idea how many of the ngrams for the letter involve constructions like "in water and land use studies" etc.? I suspect most of those involve water/land used as noun adjuncts (adjectivally).
Jul
10
comment Does the verb “unpublish” exist?
The problem with retract is the connotation of "correcting an error in content"
Jul
7
revised How can I politely express that “I have understood”?
edited body
Jul
7
comment How can I politely express that “I have understood”?
"I see" is medium formality. But you have to be careful because sometimes it can be sarcastic (="oh, you really think that?!" or "that's not the answer I was expecting"). It depends on what you say next. It is probably better used in speech.
Jul
2
comment Form of government (-archy/-cracy) where the strongest rules
Two observations: 1. strength is not always physical, so strongest <> best fighter. 2. one libertarian/anarchist argument is that the word you are looking for is state, since all state power is ultimately backed up by force in the face of challenge (don't pay taxes, we'll take your money and/or lock you up).
Jul
2
comment Form of government (-archy/-cracy) where the strongest rules
Hunter gatherers can but do not need to organize into tribes. Hunter gatherer communities can have fluid membership, especially when they are nomadic, and in this situation there are typically no chiefs, either. I would read "Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman". The wikipedia article en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunter-gatherer makes many good points too.
Jul
2
comment English word forms not having cognates in any other language
Fair enough -- but loan words do share a common etymology by extension, which is what the OP sought to avoid.
Jul
2
answered What is the opposite of compulsion?
Jul
2
comment Why doesn't English have a separate word for “head hair”? (head hair vs. body hair)
It's funny the adjectives we restrict to/copy from animal vocabulary. I'd personally like to use words like 'palomino' or 'flea-bitten gray' on people once in a while.