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visits member for 1 year, 7 months
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Apr
12
comment All the scary, … - meaning
Think of it this way: "All the details are also here..." + adjective before details.
Apr
12
answered What if + would
Apr
12
comment Signature enquiries
@WS2 Well, you'll have to pass a law about that somewhere then, because even in these globalizing times, Google ngrams has 'last name' about to overtake 'surname', with 'first name' way more popular than 'given name.' I'll also note that simply using a different word doesn't automatically make anyone more culturally literate, and that using 'first name'/'last name' is not chauvinistic if the people that use it take it to be context- and culture-relative.
Apr
11
answered Is there a word for the 'pitter patter' of speech?
Apr
11
comment What's a “brace” in the expression “brace yourself”?
People are overcomplicating this. Look up pictures of "tree brace" which is probably the visual image that kept this expression popular.
Apr
11
answered Reciprocal of “conformant”
Apr
11
answered Don' t ask a policeman what time it is!
Apr
11
comment Fixing a series of loose sentences: Strunk & White
Let's update this to contemporary English: "#Appleton rocked it at #BSO last night. Full house. Committee will continue series next year. See you May 10 for no 4!" ;)
Apr
11
revised Signature enquiries
added 15 characters in body
Apr
11
comment Signature enquiries
@WS2 Surname is as ethnocentric as last name. Its traditional opposite is 'Christian name', not first name. Icelanders don't even have 'surnames', they have patronymics; and Spaniards have two surnames from both sides of the family. Basically if a foreign language speaker doesn't learn the English concept of first name and last name they will be in trouble even if they don't use it themselves.
Apr
11
comment Mixing verb tenses involving a Past-Belief/Thought/Attitude about timeless facts
The two and two is four example is a bit of a red herring, since "two and two is four" is an example of a timeless fact, not an account of an identification like "Bob is an engineer", or a state like "The dog is sleeping", or an event like "The box is being opened", or a description like "The rose is white." I don't think timeless facts follow the same semantics. There is nothing strange in using the present tense with other timeless facts: "X believed that roses are red" or "X thought that love conquers all" or "X knew that the opposite of up is down"
Apr
11
answered Signature enquiries
Feb
6
comment “Was it a girl?” or “Was that a girl?”
@MichaelOwnSartin it would be 'Were they a girl?', not was
Nov
2
comment What is a word for someone who likes bossing people around?
@YPCrumble See edits above.
Nov
2
revised What is a word for someone who likes bossing people around?
added 663 characters in body
Oct
31
answered He nodded his head yes; she shook her head no
Oct
31
comment Meaning of “limbic system on two legs with waterfalls”
Note that this sentence also has "mixed metaphors", often considered a fault of style if not syntax, but here it seems to work successfully (and probably intentionally) to evoke humor and vividness.
Oct
31
answered What is a word for someone who likes bossing people around?
Oct
31
comment Usage of 'in in' in a sentence
The suggestion is a natural one but equivocal over additional senses meaning "users who are still active yet haven't remained logged in for more than x days" or even "users who are still active yet haven't logged in for a cumulative total of of more than x days". I would prefer "...users who are still active (or active users) and who have gone x consecutive days without logging in..."
Oct
31
comment How does one mention “first class honors” and GPA correctly on a résumé?
I'm just throwing this out as a reality check...there is likely not a single correct answer nor an informed enough audience to know what that is. There's an interesting article in the NYTimes (nytimes.com/2009/05/15/opinion/15Francese.html?_r=0) discussing among other things how a Harvard diploma was rejected in a job application because Harvard's diplomas are in Latin calligraphy and it was "returned as foreign and illegible" by the prospective employer.