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6
awarded  Nice Answer
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Dec
5
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Sep
29
comment Which one is better: “wipe out” or “wipe away”?
@user51369: web.cn.edu/kwheeler/documents/Cliches_Trite_phrasing.pdf
Sep
28
awarded  word-choice
Sep
27
revised Which one is better: “wipe out” or “wipe away”?
added 464 characters in body
Sep
27
answered Which one is better: “wipe out” or “wipe away”?
Sep
27
comment Case of Pronoun
@Lumberjack: Possibly, or maybe shifting fashions and/or a desire to avoid sounding stuffy and old fashioned. See Whom do you trust? Wikipedia says "According to Mair, the decline of whom has been speeded by the fact that it is one of relatively few synthetic (inflected) remnants in the principally analytical grammar of Modern English."
Sep
27
comment Case of Pronoun
Use of whom is infrequent and declining
Sep
27
revised 'Ask' and its objects
added 288 characters in body
Sep
27
answered 'Ask' and its objects
Sep
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
31
comment “Liquid refuse” or “Liquid waste”?
@TrevorD: Perhaps there is regional variation in British English usage - In the south of England I believe the word "rubbish" is used much more often than "refuse" in connection with household waste that is solid. E.g. rubbish bin not refuse bin. Hereabouts we no longer have tidy tips we now have household waste recycling centres. When I was a child we had rubbish dumps, we've never had refuse tips.
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18
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Jun
29
answered Adjective relating to Great Britain and Ireland
May
19
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Apr
19
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Apr
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
12
comment Is there a difference between “disc” and “disk” for naming digital storage media?
@kbelder: I don't recall it ever being used in conversation. It did appear in writing in IBM manuals and similar places but in my IT career, In the era of 5 1/4" discs people mostly said "a floppy disc" or just "a floppy". As 3.5" discs became popular, people tended to say the whole phrase "a three and half inch disc" until they became predominant. Nowadays nobody I know really uses them, so the terms are rarely heard.