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Aug
7
comment Single word that combines the meaning of fascination and hate?
I believe that the more interesting/relevant meta-question is not "Is race the best word to describe the difference between pokemons and humans?" but "Is different race a key component of the question?"  Many answers that have been suggested here — fixation, obsession, morbid fascination, train wreck — apply equally to religious differences, physical deformity, or even personality.  How do we feel about Archie Bunker?  We are repulsed by his racism, but compelled to watch All in the Family in spite of (and/or because of) it.  Are they bad answers because they're not rooted in race?
Aug
7
comment Single word that combines the meaning of fascination and hate?
It seems to me that "ambivalence" and "mixed feelings" are too soft/benign to be good answers to the question.  I don't have a good answer, but I believe "conflicted" comes closer than either of the above.
Aug
7
comment Is there a word that combines the meanings of “not practical” and “not useful”?
@Oldcat: “practical and useless”?  How about eyeglasses with flat glass (non-prescription) “lenses”?  They’re every bit as practical as vision-correcting spectacles, but (aside from secondary effects; e.g., altering your appearance, as a fashion accessory) useless.  How about putting on sunscreen when you’re going out at night?  How about a voice-activated self-destruct mechanism anywhere other than a sensitive military facility?  Nothing personal, but how about a pet cat (in a household that doesn’t have a mouse problem)?
Aug
5
comment Phrase for a situation where a problem disappears when you are about to fix it, but reappears later
I call it the "car mechanic syndrome" or the "repairman syndrome" (which was posted as an answer yesterday).
Aug
2
comment Difference between “Putting in one's papers” and “Putting down one's papers”
Ditto: in the U.S., I hear "putting in one's papers" — perhaps mostly in the context of retiring from the military.
Jul
26
comment Is there any word for the person who often forgets?
“Absentminded” makes me think, at least 50%, of a person whose mind is elsewhere; who is focused on remote matters and not the situation at hand.   The sort of person who pours Corn Flakes into the cat’s dish and then eats Meow Mix for breakfast.  The phrase “absent-minded professor” is … commonly used … in English to describe people who are so engrossed in their “own world” that they fail to keep track of their surroundings.  I believe that this is a poor match for what the question is asking for.
Jul
26
comment Is there any word for the person who often forgets?
@curiousdannii: How do you know what the question is looking for?  It asks, "is there any word for ...?"  A comment asked, "Are you looking for a noun or an adjective?" and the OP never responded.
Jul
26
comment Is there any word for the person who often forgets?
Building on @Mari-LouA’s comment: it may depend on what you mean by “forgets”.  E.g., you tell two colleagues, “We’re having a fire alarm test this afternoon.”  When the bell rings, person A jumps, and then says, “Oh, yeah, the fire alarm test; you told us about that.”  Person B, with a look of panic in his eyes, asks, “What’s that noise?”  When you remind him, he says, “What fire alarm test?  Nobody ever told me about that.”
Apr
21
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
14
comment Is there a word that means cheating but legitimate?
Related: What is a word for annoying behavior which decreases enjoyment for the other players in a game?
Apr
14
answered Is there any word for the opposite of a “bug” in programming?
Apr
9
comment Is it okay to ignore putting periods between initials?
@MartinMcCallion (and Jander): Periods are used only very rarely with pure initialisms: UAE (United Arab Emirates), UAR (United Arab Republic), IBM, ICBM, CDC, NASA, TCP/IP, UN, YMCA, etc. I'm in the USA, and I think I see "BBC" at least as often as I see "B.B.C."
Apr
9
comment Is it okay to ignore putting periods between initials?
@Mazura: Anne Vyalitsyna also initializes her surname (as Anne V).  Louis Székely is known professionally as Louis C.K., which, I guess, is based on his last name (perhaps, specifically, the pronunciation thereof).  I don't know whether you would count Mike Krzyzewski, since "Coach K" is just a nickname, but I suspect that there are others.
Apr
7
comment Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination
I believe that "dilly dally", "dawdle", and "procrastinate" are very close in meaning, if not identical.  The OP is already familiar with the word "procrastination"; using it multiple times in the question, which is asking for a word or phrase that inherently denotes malice, without needing to be supplemented by context.
Apr
2
comment Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination
Well, you mentioned "try solutions which you know are bound to fail", which is not avoidance of action, either.  And requiring legal review is (arguably) not a negative action — it may protect the company against legal problems — and it would hinder progress without causing critical damage.
Apr
2
reviewed No Action Needed I need an adjective to precede the word “method”
Apr
2
reviewed No Action Needed A question asked in order to expose ignorance
Apr
2
reviewed No Action Needed Technical train terms
Apr
2
reviewed Reviewed Why are pot-holes called pot-holes?
Apr
2
reviewed No Action Needed Word for “suddenly stand up”?