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Feb
3
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
That we hate insects even more than we hate rodents? :-)   ⁠
Feb
3
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
I understand "nuke" in the computer context to mean erase very thoroughly — in a situation where very thorough eradication is called for. I believe that it does not carry the overkill connotation that this question is about.
Feb
3
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
By my count, this is the fourth answer to refer to killing insects with unnecessarily powerful means.
Jan
31
answered Is there any equivalent to this Persian proverb? “A bad or faulty item should inevitably be kept by its owner”
Jan
31
comment Is there any equivalent to this Persian proverb? “A bad or faulty item should inevitably be kept by its owner”
But this doesn't really relate to the scenario in which dissatisfied customers return purchased merchandise to the manufacturer, which can happen (and, in fact, may be especially likely) it the product is expensive.  (E.g., if I buy something for a low price, and it's no good, I might just throw it away; I would go to the bother of returning it [and asking for a refund] only if it cost a lot.)
Jan
30
comment Are there words that are spelled the same but pronounced differently depending on whether the initial letter is capital or lowercase?
@Pakk: Actually, the noun “close” and the verb “close” are pronounced exactly the same — with a ‘Z’ sound, rhyming with “hose”, “nose”, “pose”, “rose”, “foes”, “goes”, “toes”, “doze”, and others.  It’s the adjective “close” (the antonym of “distant”) that rhymes with “dose”, and features the ‘OS’ sound that occurs in “coast” and “host”.  As Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams points out, there are versions of “closer” associated with (and sounding like) both versions of “close”.
Jan
28
answered Is there a term for a free ride without consent?
Jan
19
comment “As I am wo/man” in Twelfth Night, II, 2 (Shakespeare): a case of indefinite article omission or no?
@GoDucks: IMHO, the tiger passage is meant to be light-hearted; maybe a little tongue-in-cheek. I base this on the observation that even a young, small tiger is “a pretty serious amount of tiger”. Sure, tigers eat people (plural) and people eat chickens; but also people eat chicken, beef and pork. Since the “tigers have no problem eating man” line comes right after a reference to eating chicken, I think it’s valid to say (in a light-hearted, tongue-in-cheek way) that tigers eat man for lunch (especially in the absence of a term for human flesh in the edible sense, akin to “beef” and “pork”).
Jan
16
comment What does the slang “in my arrogant opinion” convey?
In my experience, "in my not so humble opinion" is abbreviated "IMNSHO" (one letter for each word).
Dec
22
comment What does “She was young and blithe, 22 going on 16” mean?
Of course there are trivial, mundane, non-idiomatic usages: “I’m going to visit my Grandmother for the holidays.” / “Oh; how are you going?” / “I’m going on the train.”  … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …  But seriously, I’m surprised that nobody has mentioned the song “Sixteen Going On Seventeen”, from The Sound of Music, in which Liesl is approximately 16 years and 10 months old (16 going on 17), while her boyfriend Rolf is approximately a year older (17 going on 18).
Dec
8
answered A formal reply without any useful information
Nov
30
comment Why are nouns corresponding to verbs ending with “oke” written with “c”?
@Araucaria: Yes, I Am.  :-)  ⁠
Nov
30
comment Why are nouns corresponding to verbs ending with “oke” written with “c”?
@BrianDonovan, Araucaria: You can’t get much more common than her/here.  Other possibilities include met/mete and red/rede; while “mete” and “rede” aren’t very common, I question whether “gen” is even an actual word.  As for u, I found cub/cube, cur/cure, dud/dude, dun/dune, hug/huge, lug/luge, rub/rube, run/rune, tub/tube, and tun/tune.  BTW, Microsoft Word’s spell checker recognizes “gen” as a (correctly spelled) word, but not “rede” or “tun”.
Nov
21
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
Related: What is a word for annoying behavior that decreases enjoyment for the other players in a game?
Nov
12
comment A word that means: “to break someone's lie”? I want to aggressively point out that she or he is lying
But if the second speaker isn't disproving the first statement, all she's doing is contradicting or disputing it, or accusing the first speaker of being a liar.  The question seems to be asking for something stronger than those.
Nov
6
comment Is “best” still a superlative in “best friend”, as in can you have more than one “best friend”?
@JHCL: You’re twisting the issue.  We’re not talking about the correctness of applying a superlative collectively to two or more people or things (“The fastest three runners get medals.”)  The question concerns the validity of applying a superlative individually to two or more people (or things).  I doubt that anybody would say “The Return of the King is the best-selling book, and A Game of Thrones is the best-selling book, and Hunt for Red October is also the best-selling book.”
Nov
6
comment Is “best” still a superlative in “best friend”, as in can you have more than one “best friend”?
@justhalf: The above comment applies to you, too.  Your example uses a superlative to refer to multiple people collectively, and then refers to one of that group and others of that group.  But that’s not what the question is about.
Nov
6
comment Is “best” still a superlative in “best friend”, as in can you have more than one “best friend”?
@anemone: I guess your answer is valid.  If two (or more) people tied for first in a race, I would to refer to them collectively as the fastest runners.  I would hesitate to refer to each of them individually as the fastest runner, but I’m not sure it would be wrong.  However, your comment about grandmothers makes no sense to me.  Sure, a person can have two parents (or more, depending on how you define the term), two or more children, multiple cars, etc.  But so what?  The question concerns the validity of applying a superlative individually to two or more people (or things).
Nov
3
answered Is there English proverb equivalent to Japanese and Korean one, “The ground becomes solid after a heavy rain”?
Oct
27
comment Is there a word, phrase, or idiom for a person who stays too late at an event such as a dinner party?
I live in the US, and I was going to suggest this.  I believe that it would be recognized here as an answer to the question.